Event Schedule

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Wednesday

Strengthening Identity

Topic: Health & Wellness

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28160 Strengthening Identity 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Lorraine Vandall (Cree,Canada) Culture and Psychotherapy
28161 Strengthening Identity 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Lorraine Vandall (Cree,Canada) Decolonization, Sovereignty, and Reconciliation Through Langauage

Leap of faith: reconciling the modern and ancient worlds as an indigenous educator

Topic: Indigenous Pedagogy

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27585 Leap of faith: reconciling the modern and ancient worlds as an indigenous educator 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Aroha Gilling (Te Whānau a Apanui) Every day I talk to my students about indigenous values and beliefs and in particular how important and ever present our ancestors are. Now and again the ancestors decide to talk back. This presentation is based on unexpected events, which intrude into the mundane world and present the opportunity to bridge the gap between a sceptical, largely secular society and an ancient world steeped in generations of knowledge and custom. It is framed within the principles of a kaupapa Māori paradigm to support my students and myself to develop a willingness to navigate contested landscapes with humility and a sense of wonder in an effort to test and ultimately expand our conceptual limits.

Woppaburra traditional calendars & cultural mapping- a counter-narrartive.

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27622 Woppaburra traditional calendars & cultural mapping- a counter-narrartive. 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Hendrick Van Issum (Aboriginal Australian) During Inti Raymi, an ancient Incan tradition marking the winter solstice and honoring the sun, Bolivias President Morales referred to the Gregorian calendar as 'untidy'. "We must reclaim our ancestral calendar as part of the rebuilding of our identity,” President Morales stated. Similarly, this project was part of a wider PhD thesis, where Elders' knowledge was represented visually. The culture of the Woppaburra people has been exhumed through the data collected as described in Yins (2009) case study method. I have used Yin’s (2009) multiple data sources to interpret the Woppaburra seasonal calender as a cultural map. This has then been used to inform environmental educational practice.

Ecological economic development: planning community wellbeing for the next 7 generations

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27611 Ecological economic development: planning community wellbeing for the next 7 generations 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Eric Alex (Cheam First Nation,Stolo Nation) We are currently operating at 1.5 times earths capacity to sustain us. >From time immemorial up until the 1800’s people could expect to have a relatively similar standard of living as their great grandparents. Our ancestors safeguarded our land, resources, and culture for the generations to follow. On August 8th 2016 our utilization and consumption of resources exceeded what could renew in a year. We are spending the resources that belong to the 7 generations to come by sustaining the consumption and economic growth today. Our resilience and indigenous ways of being depend on a relationship with the world around us, lets discuss what is possible today for a sustained tomorrow.

What is the impact of learning te reo Māori/the Māori language on Māori well-being?

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27691 What is the impact of learning te reo Māori/the Māori language on Māori well-being? 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Sophie Nock (Ngati Kuri, New Zealand Māori) Whilst it is clear that significant disparities exist between Māori and Non-Māori around health and well-being outcomes, and the broader picture of the Māori and Indigenous health landscape demonstrates an assumption that cultural loss as an outcome of colonization has led to poor health outcomes for Māori and Indigenous peoples. Logically, Indigenous cultural revitalization and in particular Indigenous language revitalization is assumed to increase well-being. This research will report directly on the investigation of the association between learning te reo Māori and the effects on Māori health and well-being.

Finding Evidence of Ancestral Learning Within Contemporary PreK-12 School Contexts

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27352 Finding Evidence of Ancestral Learning Within Contemporary PreK-12 School Contexts 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Dr. Meahilahila Kelling (Hawai'i,Hawai'i)
Mahina Paishon Duarte (Native Hawaiian,Hawai'i)
Dr. Denise Espania (Hawai'i,Hawai'i)
Allyson Tamura (Native Hawaiian,Hawai'i)
Dr. Chelsea Keehne (Native Hawaiian,Hawai'i)
Seventeen Hawaiian-focused Charter Schools (HFCS) participate in the Culturally Relevant Assessment (CRA) project that cascades from the HFCS Vision of the Graduate. Project objectives include cultural competency, readiness for the next level, and academic growth. Three working groups developed tools that explore the research question, What is the evidence of the Hawaiian-focused Charter School Vision of the Graduate? Presenters will gather feedback about 3 instruments and mixed method data; 1) HFCS ceremony performance assessment results (inclusive of genealogy, leadership, land connections, and reciprocal relationship dimensions), 2) HFCS Hōʻike Capstone Project Continuum summative data, and 3) HFCS Assessment Validation summary.

The unfinished process of decolonization of indigenous education in Taiwan

Topic: Indigenous Pedagogy

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27354 The unfinished process of decolonization of indigenous education in Taiwan 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Ciwas Pawan (Seejiq tribe of Taiwan,Taiwan)
Sifo Lakaw (Pangcah tribe of Taiwan,Taiwan)
Li Tsung-Wen Kuo (Paiwan tribe of Taiwan,Taiwan)
Gincu Kuvangasan (Paiwan tribe of Taiwan,Taiwan)
Shu-Mei Hu (Bunun tribe of Taiwan,Taiwan)
Hsiu-Ying You (Seejiq tribe of Taiwan,Taiwan)
Sung-En Lin (She's not an indigenous person.,Taiwan)
Jolan Hsieh (Siraya Nation of Taiwan,Taiwan)
Ifuk Saliyud (Pangcah tribe of Taiwan,Taiwan)
Komod Adop (Pangcah tribe of Taiwan,Taiwan)
This panel covers diverse indigenous issues in Taiwan on: 1) language revitalization at home, 2) ethnic identity and language use, 3) the project effectiveness of the Indigenous Language as Family Heirloom, 4) Paiwan language immersion preschool's experiences, 5) a case study of indigenous outdoor experiential teaching, 6) A study of Sediq culture curriculum and instruction in a kindergarten, 7) the contemporary action of Katratripulr meeting house's education, and 8) Indigenous research ethics: Practice and reflection.

Chalan Hinanao-ta (The Path of Our Journeys): Sharing Stories of Chamorro Ways of Knowing at an American University

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27456 Chalan Hinanao-ta (The Path of Our Journeys): Sharing Stories of Chamorro Ways of Knowing at an American University 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Teresita Lourdes Perez (Chamorro,Guam)
James Perez Viernes (Chamorro,Guam)
Sharleen Santos-Bamba (Chamorro,Guam)
In Guam, one of the few colonies left in the 21st century, the indigenous Chamorro persist in sustaining their worldviews. Chamorro faculty of the University of Guam will share their narratives of working with indigenous students within the constraints of an American university – one that has engendered distance between various ways of knowing. Participants will be invited to share similar narratives that interrogate the ways that educators and students work to narrow distance between western pedagogy and indigenous ways of knowing in post-secondary education. This sharing will open dialog that will address the struggles of indigenous peoples at large who negotiate similar relationships.

Blak Women in Business - Australia's first Global Indigenous franchise

Topic: Business & Economics

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27451 Blak Women in Business - Australia's first Global Indigenous franchise 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Madison Prince (Nyikina,Nyikina)
Samantha Cook (Nyikina,Nyikina)

Meet the driving force behind Australia's first Indigenous global franchise - The Real Aussie Company. Now based in Australia, Canada and the United States, this Aboriginal women led initiative takes the universal model of franchising and delivers it within constructs of Indigenous ideation. In doing so it creates an unique business model that provides economic advancement within de-colonised approaches to business. Presentation will coincide with the Turtle Island launch of The Real Aussie Company.

Sum of Our Ancestors

Topic: Arts

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27481 Sum of Our Ancestors 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Jo Clancy (Australia/Wiradjuri)
Becky Chatfield (Wagana Aboriginal Dancers,Australia/Kamilaroi)
"Sum of Our Ancestors" explores and confronts issues related to Aboriginal culture and identity through contemporary Aboriginal dance and storytelling. The Wagana Dancers will share who they are, where they come from, their nation and clan groups and the issues that go with identifying as an Aboriginal person in Australia with mixed racial heritage, fair skin and freckles. We will share the beautiful stories of cultural strength, pride and affirmation that have come with reclaiming, developing and sharing our dances in our community, nationally and internationally. Wagana means to dance. We will dance for you and with you and we will sit down and yarn about our way of learning.

The NSW ATSI Council of Catholic School Parents. Our Past, Our Present, Our Future!

Topic: Partnerships in Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27394 The NSW ATSI Council of Catholic School Parents. Our Past, Our Present, Our Future! 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Merindah Wilson (Kamilaroi,Australia)
Sharon Cooke (Ngemba,Ngemba Australia)
Mary Atkinson ()
Linda McNeil (Australia)
The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Parent Committee (ATSI) formed in 2006, is a state-level committee that discusses issues of importance for ATSI parents/carers with children in Catholic schools. It seeks to give a voice in State and National decision-making affecting Catholic education. The Committee provides support to schools, parents, and diocesan Catholic education offices through professional learning, advice, and resources to build and sustain home, school, and community partnerships. You will hear from Committee members as they share our success from conception to the present and our vision and challenges for the future of ATSI Catholic parent and community partnerships.

Transformative education in Vancouver, British Columbia: Using cultural humility to put truth & reconciliation to work, Indigenize your institution and humanize your educational practice – Some considerations to help liberate your learners.

Topic: Partnerships in Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27384 Transformative education in Vancouver, British Columbia: Using cultural humility to put truth & reconciliation to work, Indigenize your institution and humanize your educational practice – Some considerations to help liberate your learners. 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Justin Wilson (Heiltsuk)
Lindsay Heller-Weaver (Cree,Canada)
Lane Trotter (Non-Indigenous,Canada)
Gail Sparrow (Musqueam,Canada)
A community-based Reconciliation case study that shares how Langara aligned Indigenization with Truth and Reconciliation using a ‘Transformative Learning Equation’ as told by a non-Aboriginal President, a Musqueam Elder, a Heiltsuk Professor and a Cree Student Project Leader. Strategy, Indigenous community-service learning and intercultural student outcomes will be discussed in addition to some how to's and lessons learned for consideration in your practice/institution.

WINHEC- Reaching for Our Highest Education

Topic: Partnerships in Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27505 WINHEC- Reaching for Our Highest Education 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Laura Horton (Dene,Canada)
Hohaia Collier (Maori,Aotearoa, New Zealand)
The World Indigenous Nations Higher Education Consortium is aligned with UNDRIP Articles 12-15 and was established at WIPCE 2002. We gather annually as Indigenous and like minded people. We have created and implemented a culturally appropriate P-20 accreditation process, published journals, held research conferences, supported language initiatives and advocated for Indigenous peoples as we "resume our original form". We have the mind, spirit and ability to reshape ourselves as originally intended, reaching our highest goals that restore and retain Indigenous ways of knowing and being, with determination and action of members. Learn more about WINHEC, join us. www.winhec.org

The Listening Stone Project: Learning From the Indigenous Education Focused Collaborative Inquiry 2013-2016

Topic: Public Education for Reconciliation

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27492 The Listening Stone Project: Learning From the Indigenous Education Focused Collaborative Inquiry 2013-2016 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Susan Dion (Lenape and Potawatomi)
Debra Cormier ()
Constagno and Brayboy (2008) argue that although the writing on Culturally Responsive Schooling is insightful, “it has had little impact on what teachers do because it is too easily reduced to essentializations, meaningless generalizations, or trivial anecdotes – none of which result in systemic, institutional, or lasting changes to schools serving Indigenous youth” (p.942). Informed by the voices of community members and educators our paper investigates how the First Nation, Métis and Inuit Focused Collaborative Inquiry is transforming Indigenous Education across the province. It offers new insights and a deeper understanding of what it takes to create systemic and institutional change.

Te Aho Matua - Maori Philosophical Theory - Applied in an ITE Programme, Te Aho Tatairangi

Topic: Teaching Indigenous Histories

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27580 Te Aho Matua - Maori Philosophical Theory - Applied in an ITE Programme, Te Aho Tatairangi 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday (Beatrice)Mari Ropata-Te Hei (New Zealand Maori,New Zealand) Te Aho Matua In 1999 the philosophy of education, initiated by Dame Katerina Mataira Te Aho Matua was legislated under the Education Act S155, as the philosophy of the Kura Kaupapa Māori education system in Aotearoa New Zealand. This paper explores the nature of Te Aho Matua and how it is applied to a kaupapa Māori immersion initial teacher education programme in the preparation of teachers for kura kaupapa Māori. A case study is presented from the Te Aho Matua based ITE programme called Te Aho Tātairangi.

He Waka eke noa (Moving forward together)

Topic: Business & Economics

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27581 He Waka eke noa (Moving forward together) 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Adele Barsdell (New Zealand)
Dwayne Strickland ()
Felicity Nepia ()
Te Hauora Hepi-Te Huia ()
We are an 100% Maori (indigenous) owned registered New Zealand charity. Our primary role is to assist whanau (owners and their direct descendants) in all areas of their lives including Health, Education, Youth Development, Whanau Support (Family), Employment, Housing. Over the years we have experienced a high level of success in many of our initiatives, particularly in the area of Education, Youth Development and Grant administration. Our results show us that our programmes are; -increasing knowledge of cultural identity; -raising the achievement of Maori students; -improving personal skills of Maori teenagers and -increasing whanau (family engagement) with our services.

Preventing Student Bullying: A Return to Resilience

Topic:

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27556 Preventing Student Bullying: A Return to Resilience 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Joann Sebastian Morris (Cayuga, Six Nations, Canada; Sault Ste. Marie Chippewa, Michigan,United States)
Robin Butterfield (Ho Chunk, Wisconsin; White Earth Chippewa, Minnesota,United States)
Native students performance in school is directly related to how they feel about themselves, their sense of safety, and whether their school climate is inclusive or not. Bullying prevention research informs us that those students most frequently bullied are ethnic minority, two-spirit, and disabled. We also know that most parents and educators don't know what to do to prevent bullying or how to intervene in a bullying incident. Join us in this interactive workshop to gain knowledge about bullying and how to prevent it, and to practice easy intervention strategies. These proven practices can help end bullying of indigenous youth and ensure their return to resilience.

Challenges and Successes of a First Nations High School

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27459 Challenges and Successes of a First Nations High School 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Sylvia Davis (Ojibwe,Ojibwe, Canada)
Glen Whiskeychan (Pelican Falls First Nations High School,Cree, Canada)
Solomon Kakagamic (Pelican Falls First Nations High School,Oji-Cree, Canada)
Pelican Falls First Nations High School is located outside of Sioux Lookout, Ontario. PFFNHS serves secondary students from 24 First Nations communities. We face challenges of homesickness, loneliness, mental health issues, drug and alcohol addictions, and unhealthy relationships which could be attributed to the intergenerational effects of Residential Schools. Despite this, we have seen a high retention rate as well as a high percentage of students getting their credit accumulation. In this workshop you will hear some of our struggles, but more importantly I hope we are able to convey how we are resilient and strong in how we strive to achieve our motto “To Become What We Can Be."

Indigenous Mobilization Team (IMT)

Topic: Partnerships in Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27465 Indigenous Mobilization Team (IMT) 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Crystal Sinclair (Cree Nation,Canada)
Russ Jock (Mohawk nation,Canada)
Theresa O'Connor (Metis Nation of Ontario,Canada)
Darlene Kaboni ()
On November 22, 2016, the Ontario Public Service Employees Union (OPSEU) President Warren (Smokey) Thomas addressed First Nations Leaders from across Ontario and introduced the Indigenous Mobilizing Team (IMT), the latest OPSEU initiative to partner with First Nations communities. This initiative aims to build an effective and respectful partnership that will implement the 94 recommendations contained within the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada: Calls to Action report and will hold the three levels of government and the people of Canada accountable. This presentation will review some of the Truth and Reconciliation recommendations and present practical ways that labour unions can implement them into their collective bargaining agreements and lobbying efforts.  Special attention will be given on methods used to mobilize Indigenous union members and help them to find their own voice, both within the union and the broader society. “The key to reconciliation is through education. It was education that created this mess through the schools, it’s education that will get us out of this in the long run,” stated Senator Murray Sinclair at the First Biennial OPSEU Indigenous Conference held in Cornwall, Ontario on September, 2016. Through education there can be healing and true reconciliation. Learn how our public service union members, the frontline workers that service Indigenous people, is spearheading reconciliation by ensuring recommendations are embedded within collective agreements.  They are not waiting for the three levels of governments to act, they  are proactively advancing the cause of justice for Indigenous people.

Ignite Session 1: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing - Wednesday, July 26th - 10:00-10:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27761 Ignite Session 1: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing 10:00 AM 10:22 AM Wednesday Why We're Beading in Your Meeting
27762 Ignite Session 1: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing 10:22 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Designing a Learning Space to Bridge Indigenous and Western Cultures Weaving Community, Team, and Student Voice in a 21st Century Indigenous Learning Space

Ignite Session 37: Culturally Responsive Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 10:00-10:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27866 Ignite Session 37: Culturally Responsive Education 10:00 AM 10:15 AM Wednesday Reddening the Ivory Tower': The Indigenization of the University
27867 Ignite Session 37: Culturally Responsive Education 10:15 AM 10:30 AM Wednesday Indigenizing our teaching: Teaching resilience
27868 Ignite Session 37: Culturally Responsive Education 10:30 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Indigeneity in the Borderlands: The reclaiming of educational praxis in the struggle for Native people’s identity, liberation, and rights

Ignite Session 38: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing - Wednesday, July 26th - 10:00-10:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27869 Ignite Session 38: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing 10:00 AM 10:15 AM Wednesday It Sometimes Speaks to Us: Decolonizing Education
27870 Ignite Session 38: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing 10:15 AM 10:30 AM Wednesday "He Taonga, He koha, He Kura Pounamu" Supporting academic success and resilience in Maori students at the University of Otago.

Ignite Session 72: Health & Wellness - Wednesday, July 26th - 10:00-10:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27971 Ignite Session 72: Health & Wellness 10:00 AM 10:15 AM Wednesday Teaching Healing Through an Indigenous Language by Balancing Knowledge and Identity
27972 Ignite Session 72: Health & Wellness 10:15 AM 10:30 AM Wednesday Towards the Integration of Indigenous Health into Public Health Education
27973 Ignite Session 72: Health & Wellness 10:30 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Painting the Path of Indigenous Resilience

Ignite Session 48: Innovations in Indigenous Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 10:00-10:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27899 Ignite Session 48: Innovations in Indigenous Education 10:00 AM 10:15 AM Wednesday 'Ruralisation - Taking learning back to rural communities.
27900 Ignite Session 48: Innovations in Indigenous Education 10:15 AM 10:30 AM Wednesday Waru (Fire) - Keep the Campfire Burning
27901 Ignite Session 48: Innovations in Indigenous Education 10:30 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Aboriginal Australian and Torres Strait Islander students’ experiences with embedding Indigenous knowledges in Primary schools

Ignite Session 62: Innovations in Indigenous Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 10:00-10:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27941 Ignite Session 62: Innovations in Indigenous Education 10:00 AM 10:15 AM Wednesday Strategies for Early and Family Literacy
27942 Ignite Session 62: Innovations in Indigenous Education 10:15 AM 10:30 AM Wednesday First Nations Provincial Spelling Bee (FNPSB)
27943 Ignite Session 62: Innovations in Indigenous Education 10:30 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Expand library services for indigenous communities

Ignite Session 32: Culturally Responsive Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 10:00-10:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27851 Ignite Session 32: Culturally Responsive Education 10:00 AM 10:15 AM Wednesday Mura Gadi Indigenous Student Needs Project
27852 Ignite Session 32: Culturally Responsive Education 10:15 AM 10:30 AM Wednesday Maori Strategic Framework, A Plan for Institutional Transformation
27853 Ignite Session 32: Culturally Responsive Education 10:30 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Native American Studies at the University of New Mexico: A Story on Indigenous Leadership and Community Building

SALTWATER ~ Monuk Gapu a Journey through Sea Country

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27503 SALTWATER ~ Monuk Gapu a Journey through Sea Country 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Donna Carstens (Australian Aboriginal,Mununjali Clan group QLD)
Helen Anu (Torres Strait Islander Australia,Torres Strait Islands QLD)
This workshop will focus on the 80 bark paintings held in our collection, the first works of art used as evidence in court that saw the Yolnu people win back the rites to their sea country in Arnhem Land. These works are significant as they where created to inform outsiders of cultural customs and laws after the desecration of a significant cultural site. The Bark Paintings mean a transgression of rules, as the paintings show secrets of their tribal spiritual language, signs and symbols and shows three generations of family members passing down knowledge highlighting Yolnu's ongoing resilience and maintenance of culture.

FEATURE PRESENTATION: "Kiingitanga: The Untold Story"

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27712 FEATURE PRESENTATION: "Kiingitanga: The Untold Story" 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Mamae Takerei (WAIKATO - TAINUI,Aotearoa New Zealand WAIKATO IWI - MAORI)
Te Kahautu Maxwell ()

Kiingitanga, the untold story is about colonial greed for land, the betrayal of a friendship and the branding of a people as rebels to qualify the taking of land by force. This presentation unfolds the anguish, pain and suffering of the Kiingitanga to that of our kinsfolk across the world. 

Waiata Mai!

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28227 Waiata Mai! 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Haani Huata (Aotearoa/Waikato-Maniapoto,Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Porou, Te Arawa)

This kauwhau (presentation) will examine the learning of waiata and haka (Māori song and dance), within the researcher’s community, ie a kapa haka (Māori Performance Group), as an enduring vehicle for the revitalisation of our language, te reo Māori.  It is through waiata and haka (Māori song and dance) that the language, and cultural knowledge can be transmitted, retained and maintained!  Whakarongo-TÄ«tiro-Kōrero (WTK-Listen-Look-Speak), in essence Oral transmission, was the main vehicle for inter-generational transmission of knowledge for Māori.It is through the unbending resilience of those in this Te Reo Māori speaking community that the language has flourished.

Whangai - second class treatment in 2017

Topic: Health & Wellness

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28355 Whangai - second class treatment in 2017 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Payne Matiu (Aotearoa/New Zealand Maori) Whangai children face discrimination in health, education, and social services which others Maori children who are brought into a kin-adoption process that is a natural part of our culture. Whangai children are treated differently in Aotearoa society because of legislation that embraces mono-cultural (western European) ideas of adoption to the detriment of whangai practice. This has led to discriminating social impacts for whangai and incentivized approaches which conform to mono-cultural norms. Whangai however, is a fluid, open and mana enhancing practice that was meant to nurture and support kin-adoptions, not foster a lesser-class of children within our own culture.

Transforming Relationships for Transformative Education

Topic: Public Education for Reconciliation

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28462 Transforming Relationships for Transformative Education 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Wednesday Graeme Mundine (Bundjalung,Australia) In this workshop I draw on my experience of delivering professional education programs to teachers in the Catholic Education system in Australia. The programs highlight ways of connecting non-Indigenous people to increased understanding of their own worldviews in order to create a better understanding of, and relationship with, Aboriginal peoples. The programs focus on those things that connect us as human beings and nurture understanding in order to create change. They also connect participants with a deep spirituality which gives us greater insight into our relationship with the Creator as well as with each other.

Resilience & Resistance: Control of Telling Our Own Stories

Topic: Arts

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28153 Resilience & Resistance: Control of Telling Our Own Stories 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Tanaya Winder (Duckwater Shoshone,United States) KEEPING THE FIRE: THE RESISTANCE AND RESILIENCE OF HEARTWORK
28154 Resilience & Resistance: Control of Telling Our Own Stories 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Samantha Faulkner (Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Australian,Australia) Literature as a form of Resilience: a self-reflection

How Can We Create Pathways to Higher Education

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28097 How Can We Create Pathways to Higher Education 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Lauren Williams (Kanienkehaka/Haudenosaunee,Canada)
Laura Kooji (Nipissing FN,Canada)
NYA:WEH Programs- Native Youth Advancement with Education in Hamilton at the Elementary and Secondary School levels
28098 How Can We Create Pathways to Higher Education 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Maree Graham (Australian Aboriginal,Australia / Wiradjuri nation / Aboriginal Australian)
Angela Phillips (Australian Aboriginal,Australia / Wiradjuri nation / Aboriginal Australian)
‘Creating Positive Pathways to higher education for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’

Māori pedagogical approaches to build resilience within Māori prisoners.

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27595 Māori pedagogical approaches to build resilience within Māori prisoners. 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Conny Huaki (Waikato, Ngati Mahuta, Ngati Porou,Aotearoa New Zealand) Within New Zealand (Aotearoa) corrections Māori learners are over represented by 51%. To reduce reoffending by 25% by 2017’ an educational delivery framework was developed underpinned by ‘Māori pedagogical’ practices. The framework was developed by Conny Huaki in collaboration with her sister Melaina Huaki which was inspired by their mother Aroha Huaki based on a combined ‘learned’ experiences over many years within the education sector. The framework offers kaiako a flexible delivery approach, and offers tailored learning based on the learner goals, aspirations and strengths. The delivery methodology assists prisoners to build resilience and encourages their ability to cope and manage

Children's Savings Accounts: An Asset Building Tool to Promote Reconciliation and Level the Asset Building Playing Field

Topic: Business & Economics

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27591 Children's Savings Accounts: An Asset Building Tool to Promote Reconciliation and Level the Asset Building Playing Field 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Christina (Christy) Finsel (United States of America)

Christy Finsel (Osage), the Director of the Oklahoma Native Assets Coalition, Inc. (ONAC), will present about Native Children's Savings Account (CSAs) projects that are being implemented by ONAC and the coalition's tribal and Native nonprofit partners in the State of Oklahoma, in the U.S. The coalition is opening 570 CSAs for Native youth to support their educational and other asset building endeavors. ONAC will share the state of the field of Native CSAs, offer compelling research for CSAs in any community, provide printed information about Native CSA projects, facilitate conversation about similar savings programs, and explore ways in which you could offer similar programs at home.

Design Thinking for Innovation in Education

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27678 Design Thinking for Innovation in Education 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Rachel Franks (Iroquois - Kanien'keha:ka (Mohawk),Canada) Everyone is talking about innovation, but what does innovation look like in the classroom? How might we empower Indigenous youth to be creative, optimistic and resilient in the face of challenge? In this workshop, participants will learn to use design thinking as a framework for engaging students in project-based learning. This allows the control to be put into the hands of the students, thus enabling and inspiring them to succeed both in the classroom and beyond. This process complements any curriculum and provides teachers an opportunity to make innovation meaningful inside their classroom while drawing on topics that are culturally relevant.

The Mana Model - A Culturally Centred Tool for Positive Behaviour Change

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27537 The Mana Model - A Culturally Centred Tool for Positive Behaviour Change 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Susan Ngawati Osborne (Ngati Hine, Ngapuhi,Aotearoa/New Zealand)
Marcus Matawhero Lloyd (Nga Ariki Kaiputahi,Aotearoa/New Zealand)
Based on the MÄori concept of enhancing Mana (spiritual authority, inherent potential) this exciting tool highlights the MÄori Creation Story as the source of wise messages, examples and instructions for living harmoniously with all things on the earth. Like many creation stories, PapatuÄnuku (Earth Mother), Ranginui (Sky Father) and the Atua (Gods, Totems, Guardians and Deities) provide ancient and eternal values that focus on placing a story in people's minds to allow a perspective on what is happening in their own life. This presentation demonstrates how the Mana Model works in New Zealand Schools and the transformative impact it has had not only with Maori students and their families but with whole of school staff and students, curriculum and ethos.

Aboriginal Education Officers: Working at the cultural interface in an Australian school context.

Topic: Partnerships in Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27600 Aboriginal Education Officers: Working at the cultural interface in an Australian school context. 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Danielle Armour (Australian Aboriginal) The role of an Aboriginal Education Officer (AEO) is complex and is undertaken by Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the school context. AEOs work at the cultural interface of both Indigenous and Western Knowledges. AEOs in this study suggested that they position themselves so they are able to create a safe space at the cultural interface of both Indigenous and Western knowledges. By creating a safe space to transport Indigenous knowledge AEOs strengthen the working relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous staff. By teaching Indigenous knowledges to non-Indigenous teachers AEOs found it easier to work with non-Indigenous teachers.

Collaboration and Connections: Online support and resources for Indigenous teachers

Topic: Arts

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27586 Collaboration and Connections: Online support and resources for Indigenous teachers 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Artie Martin () Design | Media Arts is a media-based program where hands-on and online learning experiences collide with ideas and the creative process. Led by teachers who are supported by specially trained teaching artists/elders in the design of learning, students experience classroom instruction in new and powerful ways– where they are at the center of learning. Thought replaces memory regurgitation and emotional response and personal experience of students replaces a worksheet. In this workshop we will provide access to culturally appropriate online tools and resources to collaborate to build knowledge and understanding with peers from other parts of the world who are experiencing similar challenges while, incorporating their traditional languages. This platform connects with Indigenous Elders and artists through interactions in a virtual learning environment to explore relevant educational issues, curriculum and traditional indigenous values in a contemporary world."

Sharing the story of the Indian Residential Schools

Topic: Teaching Indigenous Histories

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27594 Sharing the story of the Indian Residential Schools 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Claudine Louis (Maskwacis Cree,Canada, Samson Cree First Nation) Sharing the story of the Indian Residential Schools experience in Canada has been a huge focus of the presenters' educational journey over the past decade. During this time, there has been a wide reaction to the topic as expressed from various segments of the Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities. The purpose of the workshop is to share some major insights into the issues brought forward from these different segments about how to address, manage, and move the information in hopes of seeking reconciliation amongst Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada.

First Cultures and School Cultures: The Interface of Partnerships

Topic: Partnerships in Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27617 First Cultures and School Cultures: The Interface of Partnerships 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Gina Milgate (Wiradjuri and Kamilaroi/Aboriginal Australian,Australia/Wiradjuri and Kamilaroi/Aboriginal Australian) This workshop will focus on core features of empowering school and community partnerships in relation to First Nations education and include a case study from Australia. The main topics will cover include school and community values, reconciliation, engagement and empowerment, cultural resource places, leadership, Eldership and relationships. Participants will work in small groups to apply the principles and actions from a partnership model to apply in their own schools, contexts and communities. The aim of the workshop is for participants to reflect and share knowledge and perspectives about partnerships and then enhance these by learning from others for implementation in their contexts.

RE-BUILDING OUR CHILDREN USING TRADITIONAL BLACKFOOT METHODOLOGIES

Topic: Child Welfare

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27564 RE-BUILDING OUR CHILDREN USING TRADITIONAL BLACKFOOT METHODOLOGIES 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Kathy Iitoomawawka Yellowhorne-Breaker (Siksika/Piikanii First Nation,Canada)
Stewart Apasoyis Breaker (Siksika First Nation,Canada)
Kathy,BEd.MA and Stewart Breaker,BA are co-owners of "Weasel Tail Inc.", We have worked for Siksika Child Protection for 3 summers. We provide a program that is geared at helping children to re-connect with their Siksikaitsitapii ways of knowing. Children from 5 to 12 years of age come to our Farm for 6 weeks during the summer. The children are provided with Living skills, Cultural knowledge, Animal Therapy, Cooking, Farm work and Traditional practices. We give follow-up programs at Christmas and Spring Break. We merge mainstream and traditional healing practices to help build self awareness, self care and self esteem to the children in our program.

Building adult capacity in Central Australian Aboriginal early childhood education

Topic: Partnerships in Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27389 Building adult capacity in Central Australian Aboriginal early childhood education 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Derissa Rawson (Aboriginal)
Sasha Dinnie (Aboriginal,Australia)
Teischa Coughlan (N/A,Australia)
Kara Blair (N/A,Australia)
This workshop is a celebration of the Families as First Teachers program in two remote Aboriginal communities of Central Australia. Through the sharing of stories, photos and videos we hope to provide a representation of the positive outcomes that are being achieved for local families and their children. The presenters are Indigenous and non-Indigenous people who work collaboratively to provide a culturally responsive program. Our programs are successful due to the deep consultation and collaboration with families, elders and community leaders. We believe that all of these elements demonstrate A Celebration of Resilience and we are honoured to share this with you at this unique event.

Te Whatu Kete Mātauranga: Weaving Māori and Pasifika infant and toddler theory and practice in early childhood education.

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27473 Te Whatu Kete Mātauranga: Weaving Māori and Pasifika infant and toddler theory and practice in early childhood education. 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Lesley Rameka (Maori,New Zealand)
Ali Glasgow (Tahitian/ Cook Island,New Zealand)
This presentation will report on findings from a study aimed to support contextually located, culturally embedded infant and toddler provision in Māori and Pacific peoples early childhood services in Aotearoa, New Zealand. The first phase (2015) involved each of the six services, holding meetings with elders, families leaders in their community to collect stories about caregiving practices. The second phase (Dec 2015-March 2016) involved each service examining their stories to identify their research focus, questions and strategies, The third phase (2016) involves each service teams working to develop culturally responsive practices in their services.

Gurukul & Varna Vyavastha - Indigenous System of Personalisation and Socialisation of Education

Topic: Indigenous Pedagogy

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27474 Gurukul & Varna Vyavastha - Indigenous System of Personalisation and Socialisation of Education 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Vikash Chandra (India)
Alka Vikash (Adivasi Hindu,India)
Gurukul as an indigenous educational system was prevalent across the Indian sub-continent before British colonialism. It is personalised education according to guna (merit), karma and swabhav (character) that determine varna and corresponding ambit of roles and responsibilities in the society from small (kshudra) to big (brihad). Varna could change or remain the same over a lifetime. The social organisation based on varna called Varnashram Vyavastha is designed for the individual soul or atma to progress to higher level over one or several lifetimes. Ashram relates to stages of life. Together, it leads to high quality of life marked with good Health, Happiness, Harmony and rich Heritage.

World Indigenous Research Alliance (WIRA): The Collective Potential of Global Indigenous Networks to Mediate and Moblilize Indigenous Educational Research and Development

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27356 World Indigenous Research Alliance (WIRA): The Collective Potential of Global Indigenous Networks to Mediate and Moblilize Indigenous Educational Research and Development 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Paul Whitinui (Maori,New Zealand)
Onowa McIvor (Cree,Canada)
Boni Robinson (Kabi Kabi,Australia)
Lindsay Morcom (Asnishinaabe,Canada)
Kimo Cashman Kimo (University of Hawaii,Hawaiian)
VerlieAnn Malina -Wright (Hawaiian,USA)
Veroncia Arbon (Arabana,Australia)
Frances Wyld (Martu,Australia)
Line Kalak (Sami,Norway)
Turoa Royal (Maori,New Zealand)
The purpose of this workshop is threefold: 1) To highlight the key goals underpinning the work of the World Indigenous Research Alliance (WIRA; 2) To share the various research collaborations and accomplishments that have taken place over the past three-four years, and; 3) To engage with workshop participants about their experiences, challenges,and/or successes working internationally with Indigenous peoples.

Examining the past, learning from the present, and reconceptualising the future: Resiliency and Reconciliation in Teacher Education

Topic: Teaching Indigenous Histories

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27385 Examining the past, learning from the present, and reconceptualising the future: Resiliency and Reconciliation in Teacher Education 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Christine Martineau (Cree-Metis)
Evelyn Steinhauer (Cree,Canada)
Angela Wolfe (Cree,Canada)
Gol Van Someren (Cree,Canada)
The Aboriginal Teacher Education Program (ATEP) seeks to increase the number of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal teachers with an understanding of Aboriginal histories and perspectives. ATEP’s programming is embedded with an Indigenous worldview, utilizes land-based learning, is community based and relies on the wisdom of Elders to guide students to a place of understanding and resilience. We contend that the relationships that develop between students through the cohort are sites of reconciliation as, together, Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people examine the past, learn from the present, and reconceptualise the future of education for Aboriginal peoples.

Aboriginal Knowledges, Cultural Objects and Universities

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27494 Aboriginal Knowledges, Cultural Objects and Universities 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Caroline Spotswood (Tasmanian pakana Community,Tasmania/Australia)
Delia Summers (Tasmanian pakana Community,Tasmania/Austrlia)
The conversation is about Aboriginal cultural property or Aboriginal art within universities. They are found in the nation’s universities, in their galleries and museums, hallways, and meeting rooms. The knowledges residing in the objects are not always in the control of the Aboriginal staff and students, but are alienated from them by reframing them as “art” and placing them in art collections that Aboriginal people have no authority over or engagement with. What is the role of Aboriginal custodians and best way for them to express cultural meaning within a university setting?

Enduring confiscation of native lands in the new millenium

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27603 Enduring confiscation of native lands in the new millenium 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Dione Payne (New Zealand Maori) Confiscating unproductive native land has been a stalwart of colonial policies, particularly in New Zealand. The idea of what constitutes productivity is imbued with western ideology that negates indigenous land utilisation to nourish and sustain our people. In New Zealand confiscating Māori land has been confined to the 19th century and reparations through a Tribunal to reconcile those wrongs continue to be undertaken. In reality however, government policy continues to harass the remaining land held by Māori. The notion of unproductive Māori land is now used as a means to access $8 billion of export earnings and promotes legislative confiscation that requires a new period of activism.

The leadership potential of Maori women graduates in advancing whanau (family)

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27607 The leadership potential of Maori women graduates in advancing whanau (family) 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Dorothy Hayes (Maori,New Zealand) Discussed will be a study that sought to identify the extent to which Wānanga education (Indigenous tertiary institution) at tertiary level has contributed to transforming the lives of seven Māori women graduates and their whānau (extended family). Also covered will be a consideration of the leadership potential of Māori women and the impacts of government and Wānanga policies on the ability of Māori women to contribute to whānau advancement. The largest demographic of students across all three wānanga are Māori women over the age of 40, and an in-depth study that includes this demographic provided specific insight into the impact of wānanga education for Māori.

Growing Resilience and Learning - Dharug women's way

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27546 Growing Resilience and Learning - Dharug women's way 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Jo Anne Rey (Australia) This workshop presents a research project underway in Australia involving the cultural and storying practices of seven Dharug women, custodial owners of the majority of Sydney basin. When 'Country' is predominantly a large globalised, cosmopolitan city and suburban space, it examines how relationships with Country (as place and storied space) can regenerate knowledge, culture and communal identity, provide opportunities for healing colonization-induced harm, and proposes such engagement can refocus mainstream educational curriculum in ways that also act as cultural practice opportunities that foster sustainability, de-centre human dominance, and re-centre non-human agencies.

Ignite Session 2: Health & Wellness - Wednesday, July 26th - 11:00-11:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27763 Ignite Session 2: Health & Wellness 11:00 AM 11:22 AM Wednesday Live Lokahi: Infusing Native Hawaiian cultural perspectives into teaching and counseling of students through the utilization of Lokahi
27764 Ignite Session 2: Health & Wellness 11:22 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Experiences of Running: One Dakelh Woman’s Message of Transformation and Resilience

Ignite Session 35: Culturally Responsive Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 11:00-11:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27860 Ignite Session 35: Culturally Responsive Education 11:00 AM 11:15 AM Wednesday Contested Spaces: Student experiences and Indigeneity within academia
27861 Ignite Session 35: Culturally Responsive Education 11:15 AM 11:30 AM Wednesday Kalahu: A Faculty Professional Development Seminar for Integrating Aina-based Curriculum
27862 Ignite Session 35: Culturally Responsive Education 11:30 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Okea Ururoatia Reslience in a Kura Kaupapa setting

Ignite Session 39: Culturally Responsive Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 11:00-11:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27872 Ignite Session 39: Culturally Responsive Education 11:00 AM 11:15 AM Wednesday Mainstreaming, "whitestreaming", insecure work and impacts on Indigenous staff and knowledges in universities
27873 Ignite Session 39: Culturally Responsive Education 11:15 AM 11:30 AM Wednesday Relating with Indigenous Knowledge
27874 Ignite Session 39: Culturally Responsive Education 11:30 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday World Indigenous Nations University -Celebrating Ancestral Wisdom & Resilience in the 21st Century

Ignite Session 107: Information & Communications Technology - Wednesday, July 26th - 11:00-11:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
28076 Ignite Session 107: Information & Communications Technology 11:00 AM 11:15 AM Wednesday Indigenous Youth Protectors Website Workshop
28077 Ignite Session 107: Information & Communications Technology 11:15 AM 11:30 AM Wednesday Partnering with First Nations and incorporating pedagogical innovations in technology-enabled graduate programming
28078 Ignite Session 107: Information & Communications Technology 11:30 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Indigenous Makerspaces - Bridging Traditions and Technology

Ignite Session 40: Indigenous Pedagogy - Wednesday, July 26th - 11:00-11:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27875 Ignite Session 40: Indigenous Pedagogy 11:00 AM 11:15 AM Wednesday Takapau Whāriki: An Indigenous Pedagogy
27876 Ignite Session 40: Indigenous Pedagogy 11:15 AM 11:30 AM Wednesday "We Have Always Been Researchers": Indigenous Land Pedagogies
27877 Ignite Session 40: Indigenous Pedagogy 11:30 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Two-way learning and teaching: creating "Landscapes of places; landscapes of the mind"

Ignite Session 24: Culturally Responsive Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 11:00-11:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27827 Ignite Session 24: Culturally Responsive Education 11:00 AM 11:15 AM Wednesday Australian Indigenous perspectives in school curriculum and workforce quality
27828 Ignite Session 24: Culturally Responsive Education 11:15 AM 11:30 AM Wednesday Martu Storytellers: Aboriginal Narratives within the Academy
27829 Ignite Session 24: Culturally Responsive Education 11:30 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Promoting Indigenous Social Work practice & research across the Pacific

Ignite Session 56: Innovations in Indigenous Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 11:00-11:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27923 Ignite Session 56: Innovations in Indigenous Education 11:00 AM 11:15 AM Wednesday Indigenous voices in a K-12 archive
27924 Ignite Session 56: Innovations in Indigenous Education 11:15 AM 11:30 AM Wednesday Indspire's K-12 Institute - creating positive change in Indigenous education
27925 Ignite Session 56: Innovations in Indigenous Education 11:30 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Peer Support: Educator Mentorship, a professional development e-mentoring opportunity for K-12 educators of Indigenous students.

Hawaiian Identity: Navigating Indigenous Education

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28371 Hawaiian Identity: Navigating Indigenous Education 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Dr. Randie Kamuela Fong (Native Hawaiian,Hawaii, United States of America)
Melehina Groves (Native Hawaiian,Hawai'i)
Keʻala Kwan (Native Hawaiian,Hawai'i)
Jamie Mililani Fong (Native Hawaiian,Hawai'i)
Manu Boyd (Native Hawaiian,Hawai'i)
Miala Leong (Native Hawaiian,Hawai'i)
Lāiana Kānoa-Wong (Native Hawaiian,Hawai'i)
Makaʻala Rawlins (Native Hawaiian,Hawai'i)
Keoni Kelekolio (Native Hawaiian,Hawai'i)
Kamehameha Schools, a Native Hawaiian educational charitable trust founded in 1884, has made Hawaiian Identity a strategic catalyst for cultural and educational advancement and social change. The Hoʻokahua Cultural Vibrancy Group will present on two transformative strategies: 1) ʻŌlelo Kahua: Mandatory Hawaiian language/culture program required for over 2,000 teachers and staff, and 2) Worldwide Sail of Hōkūleʻa Canoe: Unifying Hawaiians and First Nations of Turtle Island. Attendees will learn how to develop a staff indigenous language program and will discuss dynamic video of student engagement in traditional welcome ceremonies from along the Eastern Seaboard and around the world.

FEATURE PRESENTATION: "Riegádeapmi"

Topic: Arts

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28414 FEATURE PRESENTATION: "Riegádeapmi" 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Stina Therese Lorås Hessaa (Sami-Norwegian ) Riegádeapmi is the Northern Sami word for «birth». The name is inspired by the experience of being born all over again, after discovering that you are not who you thought you were. Stina was born in a Norwegian family, not aware of her sami inheritance. The Sami people of norway, especially the Coastal Sami´s, have been continuously oppressed during the last 1000 years. And after all of the Costal Sami homes and villages was burned during the second world war, and the people were transferred to southern parts of Norway, most Coastal Sami people denied their culture, their language and background, and became Norwegians. Stinas grandmother was one of these people. First time she admitted to her children that she were a sami woman she was almost 80 years of age. Riegadeapmi is a short performance about rediscovering who you are, trying to find and reclaim a lost culture and about trying to find a long lost pride in being an indigenous woman. Riegadeapmi had its premiere at the New Delhi International Arts Festival in october 2016. Stina Therese Lorås Hessaa is a Sami-Norwegian artist exploring a physical and visual expression between performance art, dance and acting. Over the last years she’s been genuinely occupied by indigenous peoples rights and her own Coastal Sami background. Stina is educated as a dancer from the Ballet Academy of Gothenburgh, as an actress from NTNU (Norwegian University of science and Technology) and has an MA from the University of Agder.

A Report Card of Progress: Indian Control of Indian Education 1972 to the Present

Topic: Governance

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28426 A Report Card of Progress: Indian Control of Indian Education 1972 to the Present 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Lewis Debassige (Anishinaabe) "Indian Control of Indian Education" was issued to the Government of Canada and the public on December 1972. This First Nations manifesto failed to secure required monies, thus condemning it to Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau's prophetic promise of "We'll keep them in the ghetto as long as they want." I will give this presentation in a storytelling fashion and touch on the challenges, failures and successes I have observed over the past forty-five years in my effort to secure commitment from Canada for the principles of "Indian Control of Indian Education." Perhaps Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will be more accommodating to realize those principles outlined therein.

Reconciliation through Truth-telling: Decolonizing education through resilient, authentic relationships.

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28430 Reconciliation through Truth-telling: Decolonizing education through resilient, authentic relationships. 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Jonathan Lindsay-Tjapaltjarri Hermawan (Pintupi-Luritja ,Australia)
Roma Aloisi (Australia)
The presentation interrogates discursive compositions of Australian Indigenous peoples through socio-historical truth-telling. Modelling authentic partnerships between Indigenous & non-Indigenous peoples, we investigate representations of the so-called Aboriginal ‘problem’ in Australian policy contexts. Transformative leadership is positioned as critical to attending to 21st Century Australian Reconciliation agendas. The discussion examines: constructions of cultural identities & associated impacts upon well-being & resilience; the role of educators as cultural & spiritual custodians; the development of culturally safe schooling environments & models of radical equity.

Narratives of building an Indigenous education activist identity

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28455 Narratives of building an Indigenous education activist identity 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Wednesday Katrina Thorpe (Australia) Using narrative inquiry, my research investigated how preservice teacher life experience and engagement in Indigenous Studies influenced their emerging professional identity. Nine preservice teachers were interviewed during the final year of their teaching degree. Each pre-service teacher shared stories of learning experiences that created tensions alongside thoughts of hope and opportunity to ‘make a difference’ in Indigenous education. Their diverse stories have challenged me to consider how to support preservice teachers who are developing an Indigenous education activist identity. This presentation considers ways to nurture this developing identity during and beyond the teaching degree.

Resilience of Youth in Hawaii

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28156 Resilience of Youth in Hawaii 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday W. Naauao Vivas (Hawaii,Hawaii)
Jennifer De Costa (Native Hawaiian,Hawaii)
Hulihia i Ke Ao o Nā Kama Lei Wahine i Hawaiʻi (Resilience of female youth in Hawaii)
28157 Resilience of Youth in Hawaii 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday W. Naauao Vivas (Hawaii,Hawaii)
Jennifer De Costa (Native Hawaiian,Hawaii)
Ka Huliau o na Koa Kane ʻŌpio i Hawaiʻi (Resilience of our male youth in Hawaii)

Resilience & Reconciliation in Education Institutions

Topic: Public Education for Reconciliation

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28150 Resilience & Reconciliation in Education Institutions 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Kelly Humphrey (Australia)
Jeremy Budda-Deen (Kamilaroi,Australia)
Two cousins, two roads, one destination.
28151 Resilience & Reconciliation in Education Institutions 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Leonie Ngahuia Mansbridge (New Zealand /Aotearoa) Kia O ( belong)
28152 Resilience & Reconciliation in Education Institutions 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Tosh Southwick (Canada) Reconciliation in Post Secondary

Indigenous Art & Culture

Topic: Arts

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28106 Indigenous Art & Culture 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Joy Keeper (Cree,Canadian) The Renaissance of Indigenous Art and Culture
28107 Indigenous Art & Culture 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Vicki Kelly (Anishinaabe/Metis,Canadian) Evoking Indigenous Artistic Practices and Pedagogies

Tuakana/Teina a theory of praxis: The leadership of mentoring indigenous beginning teachers

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27534 Tuakana/Teina a theory of praxis: The leadership of mentoring indigenous beginning teachers 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Fiona McGrath (New Zealand, Te Rarawa, Ngati Kuri, Ngati Hine (tribes),Maikio RW)
Maikio Riiwhi-Witehira (Maori, indigenous to NZ,New Zealand, Ngapuhi)
This paper is about the power and ability to return to indigenous ways of knowing and practicing the leadership of mentoring. In Aotearoa New Zealand, there is an expectation that 70% of our beginning teachers will leave Maori medium within the first two years of entering the teaching profession. This requires traditional Maori ways and attitudes of mentoring beginning teachers. Tuakana/teina is a theory of practice that is one way of mentoring Maori beginning teachers to move them from provisional to achieve their teaching certificate. Tuakana/teina is in opposition to whitestream mentoring programmes for beginning teachers. In this workshop a Maori beginning teacher shares her journey.

A Celebration of Resilience - "The Raroera Way @ The Paa" - The Ultimate Indigenous Tertiary Student Support One-Stop Shop!

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27711 A Celebration of Resilience - "The Raroera Way @ The Paa" - The Ultimate Indigenous Tertiary Student Support One-Stop Shop! 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Kameta Elaine Mamaeroa (Maaori,Aotearoa - Te Arawa, Ngati Ranginui, Te Whaanau a Apanui)
Taiepa Te Arohanui Travis (Maaori,Aotearoa - Waikato, Tamakaimoana, Ngaati Whare, Ngaati Tuuwharetoa, Te Arawa, Ngaati Ruanui, Ngaat)
In June 2016, the Waenga Takiwa Educational Support Department of Te Wānanga o Aotearoa initiated a conscientious move to enhance student support services across its territory. The institute itself experienced nation-wide reform and in an institute-first for WIPCE, two dynamic student advisors present insight-filled journeys and perspectives to distinctive service to a phenomenon termed Manaakitanga - that which is effulgently coherent in our understanding to give support and passage to all students, at every opportunity, to successfully achieve their journey of educational transformation. "If knowledge is power, then understanding is liberation." Napua McShane / Dr Manulani Meyer

Racial Battle Fatigue as it Relates to Native Americans in Predominately White Institutions of Higher Education

Topic:

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27601 Racial Battle Fatigue as it Relates to Native Americans in Predominately White Institutions of Higher Education 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Deirdre Almeida (Lenni Lenape/Shawnee,United States/Lenni Lenape/Shawnee/Native American) Presentation will focus on the newly defined issue within higher education referred to as Racial Battle Fatigue, from a Native American perspective. Racial Battle Fatigue (RBF) has developed as a mechanism to better understand the exacerbation felt by racially underrepresented groups as well as those engaged in race work. RFB is described as the physical and psychological toll taken due to constant and unceasing discrimination, microagressions and stereotype threats. This presentation will discuss the concept and examine how the “academy”, or higher education operates, with respect to RBF, with emphasis on the experiences of Native American faculty, staff and administrators in the U.S.

Intergenerational success and kōhanga reo

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27623 Intergenerational success and kōhanga reo 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Hoana McMillan (New Zealand) Kōhanga reo emerged in New Zealand to help turn around the near loss of the Māori language arising out of colonially-imposed English only schooling. Some graduates of the first kōhanga reo have now returned with their own children. However, there has been little documentation tracking kōhanga reo graduates including the intergenerational transmission of the Māori language. This workshop is based on a doctoral research which examined the role of kōhanga reo in providing a Māori education to successive generations of children and included the interviews of five families across three generations. The pūrākau (a Māori narrative approach) of one of the families is presented in this workshop.

Transitioning Indigenous Youth from High School to University – A Māori perspective.

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27614 Transitioning Indigenous Youth from High School to University – A Māori perspective. 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Frank Edwards (Maori,New Zealand. Ngati Kahungunu, Tuhoe and Kai Tahu) Te Huka Mātauraka is the heart of Māori student pastoral support at the University of Otago. Increasingly, Te Huka Mātauraka staff noticed that while there were pastoral, transitional and support service programmes that existed for students upon their arrival at University, there were very few programmes specifically for “local” students; those students who lived in the University region. The locals programme aims to recruit and retain Māori students by practicing Kaupapa Māori (Māori worldview) principles to ensure their success at University. An important concept of this is whakawhanaungatanga (relationship building)so this workshop is desgined to share some of these practices.

Revitalizing Ainu language in Japan: making language learning fun

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27388 Revitalizing Ainu language in Japan: making language learning fun 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Sayo Kudo (Ainu,Japan)
Kazumi Katayama (Ainu,Japan)
Takayuki Okazaki (Japan)
Jennifer Louise Teeter (US/Japan)
With Japan's unilateral annexation of Ainu land, fundamental aspects of Ainu culture were banned. By establishing "Former Aboriginal schools", the government planned to Japanize Ainu, and instructed Ainu to speak Japanese, leading to the degeneration of Ainu language and culture, and also discrimination. However, Ainu are working to reverse this, though there are many barriers, both practical and personal. Through audience participation, we will share how we are working to pass on Ainu by making learning Ainu funwith illustrated card games, an Maori's Te Ataarangi with Ainu language, calendar and a kids' newspaper. We will also discuss how we aim to improve these materials and methods.

Organizing the Stars: Creating a Hawaiian Perspective in Stellarium

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27511 Organizing the Stars: Creating a Hawaiian Perspective in Stellarium 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Darren Kamalu (Hawaiian)
Jessica Kamalu (Hawaiian)
Inspired by the World Wide Voyage of the canoe Hokule`a, a celestial navigation course was introduced at Kamehameha Schools. As part of the curriculum, students were tasked with contributing to the open source program, Stellarium. They spent a semester inputting Hawaiian star names, drawing constellations and star lines, and providing a Hawaiian star compass landscape for reference. They also wrote their own `oli, or chants to help remember the stars in the star lines. Their contribution to Hawaiian navigation is significant in that it provides another means for students of navigation to learn about the Hawaiian sky. They will be presenting their work, and demonstrating it's use.

Indigenous Australian Science and Infrastructure Development (SID) Winter School

Topic: Partnerships in Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27432 Indigenous Australian Science and Infrastructure Development (SID) Winter School 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Professor Anita Lee Hong ()
Hyland Jacob ()
Jade Hourigan-Scammell (Senior Indigenous Student Ambassador - SID Winter School,Aboriginal Australian)
The Indigenous Australian Science and Infrastructure Development (SID) Winter School is a joint initiative between the Oodgeroo Unit, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), WSP | Parsons Brinckerhoff (Australia/New Zealand) – led by the Brisbane Regional Office and other sponsors. The SID Winter School aims to increase access and participation in higher education for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. The five-day residential camp includes both on-campus and off-campus activities with a combination of team building and individual tasks. Students work closely with current Indigenous Student Ambassadors to develop a better understanding of life at university.

Overcoming marginalization in Australian schools

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27434 Overcoming marginalization in Australian schools 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Erin Dougherty (Mamu/Australian,Australia/Mamu/Australian)
Naomi Huxley (saltwater woman, Yanyuwa, Born in Australia. ,Australia/Australian)

ACU Equity Pathways is a federal government funded program. Our aim is to increase participation in higher education of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. We work with schools & communities to build capacity & provide access to educational opportunities which may lead to consideration of higher education. Indigenous students face many difficulties however often the biggest challenge they face is marginalization in education. Indigenous students regularly do not see their own culture valued in schools and the curriculum. This lack of value leads to high absenteeism and lack of engagement. It is often difficult to convince them that school is worthwhile.

Pedagogy of Indigenous Health

Topic:

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27427 Pedagogy of Indigenous Health 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Angelina Pratt (Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation, Treaty 8,Canada)
Betty Jean Bastien (Pikani Nation, Treaty 7,Canada)
Geraldine Potts (Stony, treaty 6, Canada)
Nechi Institute’s principles for indigenizing curriculum for community wellness is internationally recognised. This workshop is a response to the TRC Call to Action on affirming indigenous holistic health, and will focus on our interaction with the environment. Our understanding of who we are is interconnected with consciousness, space/land and health. We will apply the ancient knowledge of Indigenous holistic health for creating and restoring balance. It will demonstrate these relationships through the languages of Cree, Blackfoot and Denesuline. The workshop will share the practices for a community wellness curriculum and the process to revitalize indigenous education.

Kūkulu Kānāwai i Ho‘oulu Lāhui: Reframing Existing Laws to Restore the People and Resources of the Hawaiian Nation

Topic: Nationhood & Sustainability

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27417 Kūkulu Kānāwai i Ho‘oulu Lāhui: Reframing Existing Laws to Restore the People and Resources of the Hawaiian Nation 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Melody Kapilialoha MacKenzie (Native Hawaiian,Hawaiʻi/Kanaka Maoli)
Dana Kapua‘ala Sproat (Native Hawaiian,Hawaiʻi/Kanaka Maoli)
David Forman (Filipino,USA)
This panel highlights emerging issues in Native Hawaiian law, focusing on the paths toward reestablishing self-governance, preserving traditional and customary access and gathering rights, and protecting Hawai‘i’s natural and cultural resources. It features the Kānaka Maoli (Native Hawaiians) role in confronting the truth, reconciling the past, and reframing existing laws to restore the Hawaiian nation’s people and resources. It will share our ongoing struggle for restorative justice through efforts to reestablish self-governance, preserve traditional and customary Native Hawaiian rights and practices, and advocate for Hawai'i’s precious water resources.

Wajalkunba tjukurrba: Talking about our Dreamtime stories

Topic: Partnerships in Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27416 Wajalkunba tjukurrba: Talking about our Dreamtime stories 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Lena Long (Martu,Australia)
Rita Cutter (Martu,Australia)
David Broun (Australia)
“We teach walybala (whitefellas) what gone on before. We like to share our wangka (language) to anyone who wants to listen. How we teach our tjapukatja (young people) is how we bin learn. They learn from us. They are martukatja (Martu people). We teach them in Martu and English as we want them to learn both ways.”The Science Pathways program in Wiluna Remote Community School is a partnership between elders, school, rangers and scientists to develop an integrated two-way science teaching and learning program. The program uses on-country projects to facilitate experiential learning and integrate traditional ecological knowledge, language and science in the curriculum.

ʻIke ʻĀina: Integrating ancestral knowledge with western academics

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27407 ʻIke ʻĀina: Integrating ancestral knowledge with western academics 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Kuuleianuhea Awo-Chun (Native Hawaiian,Hawaii)
Kristi Desuacido (Hawaii)
Brandon Bunag (Native Hawaiian,Hawaiʻi)

Hālau Kū Mana (HKM), a Hawaiian-Focused public charter school, integrates ancestral knowledge with western academics to innovate by being grounded in the past. As the pressures of Western colonialism oppress indigenous ways of knowing and doing, HKM has created a model of education that is culturally appropriate while also academically rigorous. In this presentation, you will: o Learn about how HKM uses place-based learning to build native identity o See collaboration with community organizations at the loʻi (taro patch), loko iʻa (fishpond), and waʻa (canoe) o Walk through the process of planning place-based projects o Leave with worksheets to help plan your own place-based project

Reclaiming the 3Rs: Resistance, Resilience and Reconciliation.

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27399 Reclaiming the 3Rs: Resistance, Resilience and Reconciliation. 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Rewa Paewai (Rangitane o Tamaki nui a Rua)
Sharron Fabish (Te Whānau a Apanui,New Zealand)
Lisa Watson (Ngati Wai,New Zealand)
Ruth Snowden (Ngati Whatua, Te Rarawa,New Zealand)
We are Māori women professional development (PD) facilitators implementing the New Zealand education strategy ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’ in English medium schools. In this interactive presentation, we will examine the nature of: Resistance (encountered when delivering indigenous-focused PD); Resilience (required to challenge underlying assumptions and not be discouraged); and, Reconciliation (the shift that occurs when non indigenous educators begin to recognise the relevance of culturally responsive practices). We will present the tools, resources and strategies we utilise to overcome resistance and invite the audience to share their experiences and strategies.

He Waka Tauihu e Pareparea Ana - Maori Land Navigation Programme Our Land, Our Home!

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27398 He Waka Tauihu e Pareparea Ana - Maori Land Navigation Programme Our Land, Our Home! 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Joanne Leah Walters (New Zealand Maori)
Piripi Reihana - Ruka (Navigator for Maori Land Programme,Aotearoa - New Zealand)
Calvin Devine ()
Myrene Rakete ()
He Waka Tauihu e Pareparea Ana - Maori Land Navigation Programme A programme designed and delivered for the purpose of assisting Maori whanau, families in navigating the Maori Land Court processes. Court terminology and processes are taught to our people based on kaupapa Maori teaching and delivery. The programme is also designed to re-introduce, re-engage whanau with their whenua-land, whakapapa-geneology, reo-language and narratives, histories found within the Maori land Court records. The Maori Land Court is the land system that administrates, presides over Maori land. It has recorded all Court hearings, court applications, submissions, that date back to 1860.

"Taking the Leap to Tertiary Education - A Perspective from Australian Indigenous Students."

Topic: Lifelong Learning

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27441 "Taking the Leap to Tertiary Education - A Perspective from Australian Indigenous Students." 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Samuel Brazel (Indigenous Australian, Tribe- Anaiwan/Nganyaywana,Australia)
Brittany Coe (Indigenous Australian,Tribe- Wiradjuri)
Liam Coe (Indigenous Australian,Tribe- Wiradjuri)

We are apart of the future generation that wants to be known for our contribution to our communities. A first-hand student insight into how Indigenous student leadership and responsibility to community can create an environment that helps to shape resilient, successful and educated Indigenous leaders.The purpose of this presentation is to give an overview of the current situation for Indigenous students in tertiary education in Australia. Sharing our stories, experiences, and knowledge as students. Hear and see our learnings and how we plan to increase the number of Indigenous students graduating from secondary and tertiary education.

YOKAYI WAARBINY WER MALAYIN DJIN-DJIN (Celebrate Art and Cultural Spirit)

Topic: Arts

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27426 YOKAYI WAARBINY WER MALAYIN DJIN-DJIN (Celebrate Art and Cultural Spirit) 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Colleen Hayward (Noongar,Aboriginal Australian)
Julia Morris ()
Geoffrey Lummis ()
This presentation discusses the journey of a group of high school female Aboriginal students who held a public art exhibition in Western Australia as part of a collaborative community partnership. The project was designed to enhance the students’ sense of community and self-efficacy, through teaching techniques in ceramics, printmaking and painting. New projections of Aboriginality emerged, with the students expressing topography and self – key themes of the public exhibition. The project transformed a group of students with low self-efficacy and doubts of retention and achievement at school into artists who celebrated their collective worth with family, elders and community leaders.

Empowered Women Empower Others

Topic:

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27571 Empowered Women Empower Others 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Ariana Paul (Ngapuhi, Ngati Maniapoto, Ngati Tuwharetoa,New Zealand)
Tuihana Ohia (New Zealand)
Women living in the 21st Century face pressures of work-life balance which can lead to poor health and wellbeing. This workshop explores truths of women's health challenges and how we can reconcile with these truths. We discuss our engagement with people of Aotearoa and how hauora/health and wellbeing dimensions have transformed lives to bring significant change. We will also discuss our wholistic women's leadership programme, Whole Haumanu, and our vision for developing and empowering resilient women to achieve wellness and balance in their lives. We will share tips that can be immediately adopted to improve Hauora, have you moving and ignite your Hauora.

Ignite Session 42: Indigenous Pedagogy - Wednesday, July 26th - 13:00-13:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27881 Ignite Session 42: Indigenous Pedagogy 01:00 PM 01:15 PM Wednesday Whangaroatanga - I am Whangaroa
27882 Ignite Session 42: Indigenous Pedagogy 01:15 PM 01:30 PM Wednesday "Ako"and the indigenous-international student. The place of indigenous pedagogies in international education in Aotearoa New Zealand
27883 Ignite Session 42: Indigenous Pedagogy 01:30 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday "Reconciliation through Education"

Ignite Session 88: Indigenous Pedagogy - Wednesday, July 26th - 13:00-13:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
28019 Ignite Session 88: Indigenous Pedagogy 01:00 PM 01:15 PM Wednesday Seeking a Pedagogy of Difference for Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Students and the Communities They Represent
28020 Ignite Session 88: Indigenous Pedagogy 01:15 PM 01:30 PM Wednesday Beyond Black and White: how students experience learning in Indigenous Studies.
28021 Ignite Session 88: Indigenous Pedagogy 01:30 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday He Korowai Mana Ke – Empowering Futures: An indigenous Maori pedagogy to reconcile Maori student academic and social success within the knowledge power structures that govern tertiary education

Ignite Session 58: Indigenous Languages - Wednesday, July 26th - 13:00-13:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27929 Ignite Session 58: Indigenous Languages 01:00 PM 01:15 PM Wednesday A Case Study of Indigenous Outdoor Experiential Teaching in Taiwan
27930 Ignite Session 58: Indigenous Languages 01:15 PM 01:30 PM Wednesday Ko te kai a te rangatira he kōrero: Restoring Māori Literacy Narratives to Create Contemporary Stories of Success
27931 Ignite Session 58: Indigenous Languages 01:30 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Electronic language toolkit for second language learners.

Ignite Session 60: Innovations in Indigenous Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 13:00-13:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27935 Ignite Session 60: Innovations in Indigenous Education 01:00 PM 01:15 PM Wednesday Thinking BIG: Two years as Chair of Association of Pasifika Staff in Tertiary Education (APSTE) in Aotearoa/New Zealand.
27936 Ignite Session 60: Innovations in Indigenous Education 01:15 PM 01:30 PM Wednesday Leadership through Learning
27937 Ignite Session 60: Innovations in Indigenous Education 01:30 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday The resilience of indigenous educational leadership: leading from adversity

Ignite Session 86: Culturally Responsive Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 13:00-13:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
28013 Ignite Session 86: Culturally Responsive Education 01:00 PM 01:15 PM Wednesday Encouraging "best practice" for Māori Student Success in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Waikato, New Zealand
28014 Ignite Session 86: Culturally Responsive Education 01:15 PM 01:30 PM Wednesday Deepening our Collective Understanding: Redefining success for Aboriginal University Students
28015 Ignite Session 86: Culturally Responsive Education 01:30 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday "I want to be My self". Exploring the Roles of Self-beliefs, Educational Resilience and Identity for Māori Student Success as Māori.

Ignite Session 92: Culturally Responsive Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 13:00-13:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
28031 Ignite Session 92: Culturally Responsive Education 01:00 PM 01:15 PM Wednesday The success of Indigenous students at the Australian National University
28032 Ignite Session 92: Culturally Responsive Education 01:15 PM 01:30 PM Wednesday Koko'o Lale: A vessel of support and encouragement
28033 Ignite Session 92: Culturally Responsive Education 01:30 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Strength in numbers!

Ignite Session 50: Innovations in Indigenous Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 13:00-13:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27905 Ignite Session 50: Innovations in Indigenous Education 01:00 PM 01:15 PM Wednesday Te Hikoi o te Tangata na Whakapai Ake ki Tino Rangatiratanga [ A Journey of Self Care to Self Governance]
27906 Ignite Session 50: Innovations in Indigenous Education 01:15 PM 01:30 PM Wednesday Rock Solid Foundations: Celebrating Indigenous Alumni
27907 Ignite Session 50: Innovations in Indigenous Education 01:30 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Noku no Ngati Manawa hoki te ao The world is my world. It belongs to me of Ngati Manawa!

Wii Gaay (Clever Child 8-12 year old) Warraymalaya (Standing Together 14-18 year old) Learning Hubs for Education, Culture and Faith Power!!!

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28341 Wii Gaay (Clever Child 8-12 year old) Warraymalaya (Standing Together 14-18 year old) Learning Hubs for Education, Culture and Faith Power!!! 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Sharon Cooke (Aboriginal people of Australia,Ngemba Weilwan Nation Brewarrina NSW Australia)
Lee Herden (Aboriginal people of Australia,Ngemba Weilwan Nation Brewarrina NSW Australia)
Catherine Taylor (Aboriginal people of Australia,Ngemba Weilwan Nation Brewarrina NSW Australia)
We will explore the importance of cultural awareness and spiritual selfefficacy as a vehicle to support educational change in a western system of educational learning for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in the Armidale Diocese in North West NSW Australia.We will also show how love and faith become the driver of that vehicle toward educational power.The Armidale Diocesan system of schools integrate an understanding of traditional spiritual beliefs/faith and the Christian love of Christ within ATSI cultural programs to work towards self-efficacy & high educational excellence for ATSI people.

Controlling a transformation of an Indigenous Culture into a Sustainable Tourism Currency

Topic: Nationhood & Sustainability

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28376 Controlling a transformation of an Indigenous Culture into a Sustainable Tourism Currency 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Ashley Reed Puriri (Ngati Kahungunu, Ngati Rongomaiwahine, Ngati Porou, Tuwharetoa,New Zealand) This paper discusses controlling the transformation process of an Indigenous culture into a sustainable tourism currency by identifying cultural underpinnings when developing a distinctive cultural tourism experience. Identifying cultural values through a case study of a Māori Whānau developing a cultural tourism experience in New Zealand. Cultural controllers manage the way indigenous people moderate their tourism development. Whakapapa is a crucial cultural method and value applied by Indigenous Elders when managing and directing the development of a Maori tourism development. A cultural paradigm provides a framework for understanding the levels of cultural significance

Experiential Learning with Indigenous Teacher Candidates

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28456 Experiential Learning with Indigenous Teacher Candidates 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Wednesday Veronica Stewart (Cree Metis,Canada)
Bente Huntley (Cree Metis,Canada)
Ysabel Gallegos (Cree Metis,Canada)
Cooper Skjeie (Cree Metis,Canada)
Amanda Nelson (Cree Metis,Canada)
With an emphasis on Indigenous Studies, Indigenous Pedagogy, and Cultural Knowledge, Saskatchewan Urban Native Teacher Education Program (SUNTEP) teacher candidates in Prince Albert participate in cultural camps, cultural events, and Indigenous centered courses. Students can opt to participate in a Cultural Committee, Cultural ceremonies, and have access to Elders and Knowledge Keepers throughout the program. By immersing teaching candidates in Indigenous pedagogy and ways of knowing, they become mentors in their schools, integrating Indigenous knowledge and teaching methods. This presentation will share the methods and student impact of the program from faculty and student perspectives.

adult language programs

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28087 adult language programs 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Kahtehron:ni Iris Stacey (Mohawk Nation) Redefining Success for Indigenous Language Programming - A Kincentric Approach
28088 adult language programs 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Khelsilem Rivers (Squamish Nation)
Nicki Benson (N/A,Canada)
Reflections on Adult Immersion for Language Revitalization

Story Telling: Another Side to Maori Men's Health and Wellbeing

Topic:

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27677 Story Telling: Another Side to Maori Men's Health and Wellbeing 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Pita Shelford (Maori,Te Rarawa (Tribe), New Zealand) This presentation is drawn from a study that seeks to understand how different generations of Māori men view, experience and learn about health and wellbeing. Māori men are over represented in New Zealand health statistics disproportionate to the total population; this is just one side of the story. I take the view that there is an alternative story to the “poor health stats” of Maori men. I will tell my story of collecting an alternative story and share my experience of integrating two different worlds to get there; the Western academic world and the Māori world.

Pen Pal Project-Neighbouring Communities

Topic: Public Education for Reconciliation

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27560 Pen Pal Project-Neighbouring Communities 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Suzie Miller (Six Nations of the Grand River Territory,Canada/Mohawk Nation-Six Nations)
Scot Cooper (Six Nations of the Grand River Territory,Canada)
The Pen Pal Project is a grassroots community initiative that was started by a teacher from Six Nations of the Grand River Territory in 2006. She reached out from her Grade 3/4 class at Six Nations and invited a Grade 3/4 class from Caledonia (a neighbouring community) to write letters to each other. This gesture was rooted in peace and understanding after a Land Claim dispute erupted into community conflict, violence and media mis-representation. Realizing that there was a lack of education and knowledge in the area of Treaty Agreements and the true history of Canada, the teacher simply wanted the children to understand the value of their relationships. In 2016, 2500 students participated.

Urupū ki te ara – dedicated to the journey: The return journey of the tribes Ngāti Unu and Ngāti Kahu to tribal cultural prosperity.

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27615 Urupū ki te ara – dedicated to the journey: The return journey of the tribes Ngāti Unu and Ngāti Kahu to tribal cultural prosperity. 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Gary Shane Te Ruki (Māori,Aotearoa New Zealand) The return journey of the tribes Ngāti Unu and Ngāti Kahu to tribal cultural prosperity after a 150 years of oppressive and intentional colonisation of Aotearoa New Zealand began in 1998 and raised the question: Is the return journey to tribal cultural prosperity possible when those on that journey carry a virus load of colonisation whose symptoms work against tribal cultural prosperity, its preservation, retention, and growth? This presentation explores the challenge of purging the virus ‘colonisation’, and its pervasive influence within the present and future generations. Traditional practices have helped to mitigate some of the symptoms of colonisation. Where is the anti-virus?

Decolonizing Chases Indigenizing – Haudenosaunee Efforts at Reclaiming Authenticity

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27554 Decolonizing Chases Indigenizing – Haudenosaunee Efforts at Reclaiming Authenticity 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Robert Antone (Oneida nation,Canada)
Richard Hill (Tuscarora nation)
Since December 2012 the Grand Council of the Haudenosaunee (Six Nations Iroquois Confederacy) has taken a position to offer their communities educational awareness of colonization during the Recital of their ancient teachings of democratic peacemaking, the Great Law of Peace. From the summer of 2013 a Recital has been conducted in a different Haudenosaunee community each year. Each Recital began with a review of the colonial history that has committed genocide and in some cases marginalized cultural knowledge. This is important step in gaining a community wide understanding of intergenerational trauma, oppression, genocide, land theft, residential schools, and doctrine of discovery. Gaining greater knowledge and understanding removes the yoke of oppression. The challenge then is to seek the Indigenous sovereignty that can be real through revitalizing ancient knowledge in a transformative way that brings these teachings into a contemporary reality by indigenizing of foundational narratives that insert new life into Haudenosaunee culture amidst the mainstream chaos. Through the use of clan discussion groups, history and cultural knowledge are immersed in a dialogue across generations seeking new ways to understand creeds, values, philosophies, natural law, and familial teachings. The importance of sharing in clans allows all voices to owe the desire of original knowledge increasing the movement towards an indigenization of identity. This workshop will provide a narrative of the importance of combining a real review of the invasion and its outcomes with original knowledge in a way that demystifies cultural movement towards an enlightened future.

Reconciling Indigenous and Western Ways in the Learning Lodge

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27541 Reconciling Indigenous and Western Ways in the Learning Lodge 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Rose Thater Braan-Imai (Tuscarora,USA)
Melissa Nelson (Turtle Mountain Anishinaabe,United States)
Native youth need a reflection of themselves in an education system that does not recognize their worldviews and learning processes as valid. Can Indigenous transmission of knowledge occur within a western education system? What are the conditions that allow it or what are the obstacles that prevent it? Are there ways in which we are complicit in the devaluing of Native ways of learning? This workshop presents Native peoples as gifted learners who use their bi-cognitive abilities to contribute sophisticated thinking, creative ideas, and pragmatic solutions. Such realizations and experiences restore the sense of belonging and foster the reconciliation of Native and Western worldviews.

Conversaciones con mi sangre

Topic: Teaching Indigenous Histories

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27584 Conversaciones con mi sangre 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Anna-Maria Bribiesca (Mexico,Mexico)
Moarikura Sandria Johnson (Maori,Aotearoa New Zealand)
Through auto-ethnography modes of understanding and critically reflecting on how art is created, what meanings art works carry, and how those meanings are taught and learned within familial intergenerational situations. To explore through conversations with one’s immediate family, in particular an elder, how intergenerational knowledge about art and art making has been, and continues to be, transmitted by one’s ancestors.

A Two Roads Approach to Indigenous Knowledge and Research

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27428 A Two Roads Approach to Indigenous Knowledge and Research 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Tanis Hill (Mohawk,Canada)
Taylor Gibson (Mohawk,Canada)
Heather George (Mohawk,Canada)
Deyohaha:ge: works from a community-driven approach to collaborate with academic institutions and organizations in building a place for Indigenous ways of knowing, learning and information gathering and sharing. This presentation will focus on best practices and challenges encountered through various projects that have been undertaken to facilitate inter-community dialogues and knowledge building through an overview of current and past projects that include reinterpretation of archival records, collections database development, language recording, youth programming, webinars and seminars, curriculum development, and the Indigenous Knowledge Guardian recognition program.

Indigenous Land-based Education

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27429 Indigenous Land-based Education 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Elisabeth Utsi Gaup (Sami,Norway) What are indigenous communities offering as land-based educative opportunities? This workshop give us space for encouraging ourselves to communicate and articulate the interconnectedness we have to our land and go further with designing curriculums and protect the customary use of our land resources in accordance with traditional practices. Land-Based Education in different environments helps enhance taking care of the culture values and our languages, as well as our connection to the land. We will recognize our ways of knowing the land, how our stories, music, the vocabulary and skills are a part of that.

Inuksuk: Sharing Experiences of Nunavut - development of an interactive eBook

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27433 Inuksuk: Sharing Experiences of Nunavut - development of an interactive eBook 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Mary Ellen Gucciardi (Nurraq Outfitting,Canadian)
James Flaherty (Nurraq Outfitting,Canadian)

In an effort to bridge the gap between north and south, the Dufferin-Peel Catholic District School Board made a commitment five years ago to learn about Inuit culture and it has evolved into a passion and a privilege that we are still nurturing. Both students and educators have had several opportunities to travel from the south to visit Nunavut and experience a first-hand glimpse of the northern landscape, the people and culture. We have compiled experiences from several learning excursions to the Arctic and created an iBook, Inuksuk: Sharing Experiences of Nunavut, which focuses on what we have learned, relationships we have formed and knowledge acquired about Inuit culture.

Konthahonninoron (They make a precious road) Finding Homeplace in Indigenous Women's Literature

Topic: Indigenous Pedagogy

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27631 Konthahonninoron (They make a precious road) Finding Homeplace in Indigenous Women's Literature 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Jennifer Brant () This workshop shares a unique pedagogical approach based on Indigenous maternal teachings. Indigenous women’s literature will be presented as a site of “homeplace” (bell Hooks, 2007)connected to an understanding of maternal essence and cultural continuity. This Indigenous understanding of "homeplace" moves beyond a site of resistance and is presented as a source of strength that inspires resilience and connects the past, present, and future. Within this context, the classroom becomes a safe space for cross-cultural and emotionally charged dialogue. It is also a site for transformative learning that promotes compassion and empathy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous learners.

Mana Mokopuna: From Waharoa to Wahakura. Applications of Raranga and Tikanga Pa Harakeke for the Protection of Papatuanuku (Earth Mother) and Mokopuna.

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27697 Mana Mokopuna: From Waharoa to Wahakura. Applications of Raranga and Tikanga Pa Harakeke for the Protection of Papatuanuku (Earth Mother) and Mokopuna. 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Tanya White (Ngāti Whātua, Ngāti Hine, Ngāti Maniapoto) This workshop speaks about raranga (weaving) epistemology. It acknowledges raranga and tikanga pa harakeke (sustainable practices) as points of access to a specific way of knowing and being that is Maori. Mokopuna (young children), or rito, are at the heart of the matter. They are seeds of divine order, sown in Rangiatea, the ancient homeland. E kore e ngaro, he kakano ahau i ruia mai no Rangiatea.

Geo/ Temporal Tagging: Skaru:re' Youth Strengthening Skills in Cultural Resurgence Through Locative Media

Topic: Information & Communications Technology

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27575 Geo/ Temporal Tagging: Skaru:re' Youth Strengthening Skills in Cultural Resurgence Through Locative Media 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Mia McKie (Tuscarora Nation, Turtle Clan,Tuscarora Nation, Haudenosaunee Confederacy)
Waylon Wilson (Tuscarora Nation, Deer Clan,Tuscarora Nation, Haudenosaunee Confederacy)
The Skaru:re Youth Initiative empowers teenagers from the Tuscarora Nation with our traditional knowledge in order to strengthen community and the Haudenosaunee Confederacy through the development of multi-media skills. Our workshop demonstrates how we use technology as a medium in multi-generational engagement and cultural resurgence, while building essential skills for Tuscarora youth. The locative aspect of mobile apps enables our teens to connect to our lands through the new media of place-based storytelling. The process of creating a mobile app within our community engages and bridges generational divisions and is encouraging the development of more cultural-learning mobile applications

Saint Elizabeth First Nations, Inuit and Metis Program, Responding to the Unique Education Needs of Indigenous Communities

Topic: Partnerships in Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27606 Saint Elizabeth First Nations, Inuit and Metis Program, Responding to the Unique Education Needs of Indigenous Communities 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Doris Warner (First Nations, Inuit and Métis Program,Canada) We are an innovative team that works in partnership with more than 500 Indigenous communities and organizations across Canada to positively impact health and wellbeing at the local level. Our work is focused on providing virtual education at no cost to health care providers working in First Nation communities, conducting action-based research to help understand and address gaps and barriers to care, and mobilizing knowledge exchange and community-driven approaches to health and well-being. We developed 13 online courses with and for First Nations; over 2,400 health care providers have completed our courses, with more than 9,600 hours of learning last year alone.

Mauri Tau- Creating a Therapeutic Space in a Mental Health Service

Topic:

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27608 Mauri Tau- Creating a Therapeutic Space in a Mental Health Service 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Dr Pikihuia Pomare (Te Rarawa, Ngāi Te Rangi,New Zealand) Many indigenous peoples present to mental health services with symptoms of trauma (personal, whānau (familial/ extended familial, intergenerational/historical). Our aim is to develop a space within a mental health service that will facilitate healing using a range of healing modalieities based on indigenous Māori practices to assist our tāngata whai i te ora (service users) to develop a tool kit of skills to enable them to regulate difficult emotions. This space enable tāngata whai i te ora to explore their unique pūmanawa (intuitive gifts/strengths) to move towards mauri tau (contentment/ settled energy).

Creating Speakers & Reviving Languages With The Root-Word Method

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27670 Creating Speakers & Reviving Languages With The Root-Word Method 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Owennatekha (Brian Maracle) (Kanyen'keha:ka ("Mohawk"),Ohsweken (Six Nations Grand River Territory, Canada)) Onkwawenna Kentyohkwa uses the Root-Word Method it pioneered in 1999 to teach an intensive full-time adult immersion program on the Six Nations Grand River Territory. The program creates Advanced-Level Mohawk speakers over two school years. The Root-Word Method is being adopted by language groups across North America. The presentation will outline what the Root-Word Method involves, the curriculum structure and the teaching methods.

Native Hawaiian Academic Advancement through the Research of Ancestral Scientific Knowledge

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27644 Native Hawaiian Academic Advancement through the Research of Ancestral Scientific Knowledge 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Keolani Noa (Kanaka ʻōiwi/Native Hawaiian,USA/Hawai`i)
Alex Awo (Haumana)
Andrew Chang (Haumana)
Kimberly Kahaleua (Haumana)
Sharysse Kanehailua (Haumana)
Aikue Napoleon-Ahn (Haumana)
Leilani Watanabe (Haumana)
Research and internships are a vital component to the academic success of Native Hawaiian students. To foster Native Hawaiian student enrollment the “Model of Understanding”, a tiered level research design, was developed and implemented. At the core of this multi-level model system is the implementation of a learning process through ʻĀina (land) based learning. ʻĀina-based research is a hands-on approach to developing scientific expertise, connecting indigenous students to an inherit model of learning, while promoting skill building through strengthened academic experiences, in turn, creating a self-directed learner. Cultivating positive engagement through relevant research, underrepresented students discover their place in science and uncover their value in their community; thus confirming their identity, affirming their intelligence and restoring the confidence needed for success. This workshop will provide indigenous educators and learners with a “Model of Understanding” proven to increase the academic rates for indigenous student enrollment, persistence and graduation.

Rethinking Adolescent Literacy: An Innovative Instructional Coaching Model

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27408 Rethinking Adolescent Literacy: An Innovative Instructional Coaching Model 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Dominic Beaudry (First Nations, Education Director of a Band-Operated School,Canadian/First Nations)
Mark Gibeault (Canadian/First Nations)
Brian Weishar ()
Effective board-wide reform efforts require a thoughtful, well-informed, sustained process that includes planning, implementation, and ongoing improvement. This workshop explores a specific, practical indigenous board's approach and features that have supported effective adolescent literacy instruction that deepened teachers' professional knowledge and practice through a coaching cycle, thereby improving the potential achievement and learning of all students at Wikwemikong. Presenters will elaborate on the characteristics of this coaching-in-residence model and results to date for supporting teacher leadership development that sets goals that are meaningful to the specific needs of students.

Mauri Oho

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27569 Mauri Oho 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Rebekah Ripeka Lessels (New Zealand)
Tina Ngaraima Low (Ngati Tuwharetoa Māori,New Zealand)
Mauri Oho began for us in 2014 as a response to developing a 21st Century approach to teaching and learning for indigenous children. This workshop will present one way of affecting the learning and ultimately the achievement of L2 indigenous children. Mauri Oho is cognizant of retaining customary rituals and protocols while using devices and so have developed ways of ensuring that these are maintained throughout the Mauri Oho journey. The workshop will demonstrate how both the teacher and the children co-construct learning tasks that are largely completed using a device. It will also look at how children are monitored through their Mauri journey.

Wakan Tipi and Indian Mounds Park: Reclaiming an Indigenous Feminine Sacred Site as a Place of Learning and Ceremony

Topic: Teaching Indigenous Histories

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27559 Wakan Tipi and Indian Mounds Park: Reclaiming an Indigenous Feminine Sacred Site as a Place of Learning and Ceremony 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Jim Wambdi Hanyetu Rock (USA/Dakota/USA)
Roxanne Biidabinokwe Gould (Grand Traverse Band Odawa/Ojibwe,USA/Grand Traverse Band Odawa/Ojibwe/Indigenous/USA)
This session will provide a critical examination of the history, cosmology, destruction and restoration of an Indigenous sacred site, known to the Dakotas as Wakan Tipi or sacred lodge. The colonization of Turtle Island resulted in genocide, and attempts to erase the Indigenous feminine cosmology that permeated our lands, especially our centers of power. Wakan Tipi/Indian Mounds Park, with it’s feminine birth mounds, connecting earth and sky, was the birth place of the Dakota peoples. Learn about the collaboration that has restored the site from a toxic waste dump to a place of ceremony and learning once again.

The forced knowledge doesn’t stay in a head: Storytelling as an upbringing method in the Saami reminiscence literature

Topic: Indigenous Pedagogy

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27619 The forced knowledge doesn’t stay in a head: Storytelling as an upbringing method in the Saami reminiscence literature 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Hanna Helander (Saami,Finland, Saami) The name of the presentation is a Saami proverb which hints that knowledge isn’t absorbed as a given fact, but learning by doing and absorbing the knowledge in a shape of a story, makes the knowledge easy to embrace and understand. The study presents storytelling as an upbringing method in the Saami muittašangirjjálašvuohta – reminiscence literature. Muittašangirjjálašvuohta is a genre of the Saami autobiographical literature that is based on the oral tradition. The narratives offer personal and local information about storytelling as an upbringing method. The study expands the view of the Saami upbringing and gives new tools for handling upbringing as a phenomenon.

"The Result of a Dream" Receiving the Maori Education Package

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27618 "The Result of a Dream" Receiving the Maori Education Package 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Hana-Te Kowhai Ohia (Maori,New Zealand) In 1975, less than 5% of Māori children could speak Te Reo Māori, the indigenous language of Aotearoa, New Zealand. My ancestors dreamt that Te Reo Māori would be normalised in Aotearoa, and the Kohanga Reo movement paved the way in making this dream reality. Ever since, there has been a boom in Kaupapa Māori ways of learning. This presentation is a personal account of how growing up within the full immersion Māori schooling system influenced my development and my transition in to a Western tertiary institution. However, with my father being my principal and my mother being my teacher, this also tells stories on how being raised by indigenous educators influenced my education.

Ignite Session 76: Partnerships in Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 14:00-14:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27983 Ignite Session 76: Partnerships in Education 02:00 PM 02:15 PM Wednesday Exercising Sovereignty in Mainstream Research Institutions of Higher Education
27984 Ignite Session 76: Partnerships in Education 02:15 PM 02:30 PM Wednesday Indigenizing the Academy: Creating meaningful change to meet the needs of Indigenous students and communities
27985 Ignite Session 76: Partnerships in Education 02:30 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Nipping it in the bud. Changing the face of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education through collaborative practice.

Ignite Session 22: Innovations in Indigenous Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 14:00-14:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27821 Ignite Session 22: Innovations in Indigenous Education 02:00 PM 02:15 PM Wednesday The Evolution of an Indigenous Education Model
27822 Ignite Session 22: Innovations in Indigenous Education 02:15 PM 02:30 PM Wednesday AI Non-Profits, Data and the Tribal College Programs
27823 Ignite Session 22: Innovations in Indigenous Education 02:30 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday The need for a professional association of professional Indigenous college and university professors.

Ignite Session 9: Culturally Responsive Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 14:00-14:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27782 Ignite Session 9: Culturally Responsive Education 02:00 PM 02:15 PM Wednesday The San’yas Indigenous Cultural Safety Training Program and the Ontario Public Service
27783 Ignite Session 9: Culturally Responsive Education 02:15 PM 02:30 PM Wednesday Te Rautaki Whakawhanake Kaupapa Māori
27784 Ignite Session 9: Culturally Responsive Education 02:30 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday KIWA: Enduring innovative indigneous tertiray education

Ignite Session 17: Culturally Responsive Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 14:00-14:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27806 Ignite Session 17: Culturally Responsive Education 02:00 PM 02:15 PM Wednesday Te Rautaki Whakawhanake Kaupapa Māori: Integrating Māori Indigenous Knowledge at the University of Canterbury
27807 Ignite Session 17: Culturally Responsive Education 02:15 PM 02:30 PM Wednesday Enhance Indigenous in an Executive world
27808 Ignite Session 17: Culturally Responsive Education 02:30 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Digging Under the Foundations of Policy: Indigenous Identity and Education

Ignite Session 30: Health & Wellness - Wednesday, July 26th - 14:00-14:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27845 Ignite Session 30: Health & Wellness 02:00 PM 02:15 PM Wednesday Moving Whanau/Families to Health and Wellbeing - TriMaori
27846 Ignite Session 30: Health & Wellness 02:15 PM 02:30 PM Wednesday Ngarali' (traditional tobacco) and the Yolngu peoples of East Arnhem Land
27847 Ignite Session 30: Health & Wellness 02:30 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Educating about lateral violence in the Aboriginal community in Adelaide

Ignite Session 78: Indigenous Languages - Wednesday, July 26th - 14:00-14:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27989 Ignite Session 78: Indigenous Languages 02:00 PM 02:15 PM Wednesday Holistic Assessment of the Mi'kmaw Language in the Early Years
27990 Ignite Session 78: Indigenous Languages 02:15 PM 02:30 PM Wednesday Teaching my language using numonic symbols
27991 Ignite Session 78: Indigenous Languages 02:30 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Indigenous languages in the city: how to retain them, how to transmit them

Double discrimination confronting Indigenous students in Ontario’s publicly funded francophone school system

Topic: Public Education for Reconciliation

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28311 Double discrimination confronting Indigenous students in Ontario’s publicly funded francophone school system 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Marie Marion (First Nation, Anishinaabe,Canada)

Ontario's First Nation, Metis and Inuit policy framework is published in both English and French, as schooling is offered to provincially funded schools in these languages.  This workshop will look at both documents, providing an analysis of the English document, which will then be compared to the French document, revealing the differences between the two.  The comparison will reveal social justice issues inherent in the documents, which are used throughout Ontario.  It will then look at Ontario's FNMI Policy Framework in light of the Truth and Reconciliation Committee's Calls to Action.

POI IN PURSUIT OF EDUCATION

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28353 POI IN PURSUIT OF EDUCATION 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Tania Hunter (MAORI - Ngati Porou Maori, AOTEAROA,New Zealand)
Helen Crawford (MAORI - NGATI POROU/NGAPUHI, AOTEAROA,New Zealand)
Kirialana Wilson-Karini (Maori-Te Ati Haunui a Paparangi,New Zealand)
THE PRIMARY OBJECTIVE OF OUR ABSTRACT IS TO DISCUSS THE ROLE AND IMPACT OF INDIGENOUS EDUCATION AT OUR SCHOOL AND THE REVITALIZATION OF TIKANGA MAORI (MAORI CUSTOMS) IN ORDER TO CREATE A LOCALIZED CURRICULUM. AT TE KURA KAUPAPA MAORI O MANGATUNA, WE EDUCATE AND CELEBRATE THE RESURGANCE AND REVITALIZATION OF TE REO ME ONA TIKANGA THROUGH TE MARAUTANGA O MANGATUNA (TKKM O MANGATUNA LOCAL CURRICULUM). THIS IS A CELEBRATION OF OUR RESILIENCE... E RERE TAKU POI 'MATAURANGA' (POI IN PURSUIT OF EDUCATION) THIS WORKSHOP WILL INCLUDE HISTORY, A DEMONSTRATION, A HANDS ON ACTIVITY AND EVIDENCE OF THE USE OF POI IN A LOCALISED INDIGENOUS CURRICULUM.

FEATURE PRESENTATION: "KAIROS Blanket Exercise"

Topic: Public Education for Reconciliation

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28377 FEATURE PRESENTATION: "KAIROS Blanket Exercise" 02:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Sara Anderson (German Mennonite and Métis ancestry ,Canada)
Dr. Bob Phillips (non-Status Urban Mi’kmaq (Great Bear),Canada)
The KAIROS Blanket Exercise is an interactive learning experience that teaches the Indigenous rights and history Indigenous and non-Indigenous people are rarely taught in mainstream education systems. Developed in response to the 1996 Report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples—which recommended education on Indigenous history as one of the key steps to reconciliation, the Blanket Exercise covers over 500 years of history in a 2-hour participatory workshop. Blanket Exercise participants take on the roles of Indigenous people in Canada. Standing on blankets that represent the land, they walk through pre-contact, treaty-making, colonization and resistance. They are directed by facilitators representing a narrator (or narrators) and the European colonizers. Participants are drawn into the experience by reading scrolls and carrying cards which ultimately determine their outcomes. By engaging on an emotional and intellectual level, the Blanket Exercise effectively educates and increases empathy for those unaware of the colonialism that Indigenous people still face today. The exercise is followed by a debriefing session in which participants have the opportunity to discuss the experience as a group. This often takes the form of a Talking Circle. The KAIROS Blanket Exercise at WIPCE 2017 is hosted by the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC). CMEC is an intergovernmental body founded in 1967 by ministers of education across Canada, and works to provide leadership in education at the pan-Canadian and international levels. Indigenous education has been a part of the work of CMEC since it was made a priority in 2004. Education ministers are currently implementing a plan of work to respond to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s (TRCC) Call to Action no. 63 and operate within the spirit of the objectives and principles of the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Warning: The Blanket Exercise walks through difficult experiences, such as Indian Residential Schools, the Sixties Scoop and other colonial policies that have affected Indigenous peoples. Cultural and health support will be provided during and after the exercise. For more information, please contact Sara Anderson (sanderson@kairoscanada.org).

Hale Mua Initiative- Reestablishing the Traditional Hawaiian Men's House

Topic: Lifelong Learning

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28457 Hale Mua Initiative- Reestablishing the Traditional Hawaiian Men's House 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Wednesday Trisann Mahealani Bambico (Native Hawaiian)
Kamanaopono Crabbe (Native Hawaiian)
Umi Kai (Native Hawaiian)
Based on feedback from the Native Hawaiian community, the nonprofit organization Aha Kane developed the Hale Mua Initiative to reestablish hale mua (traditional men's houses) in three Native Hawaiian communities. Using a year-long culturally based curriculum, the project teaches kane (men) about traditional male roles and responsibilities and reestablishes inter-generational relationships among participants by incorporating opio (young men) and keiki kane (boys) into the group. The Hale Mua helps to strengthen Native Hawaiian communities to be healthy, culturally grounded leaders and contributing members of society.

Indigenous Strategic Planning

Topic: Public Education for Reconciliation

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28115 Indigenous Strategic Planning 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Candace Brunette (Cree (James Bay ininew),Canada)
Ezekiel Rick (Settler Ally,Canada)
Indigenizing a university: Transformative approaches to institutional planning
28116 Indigenous Strategic Planning 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Candace Brunette (Cree (James Bay ininew),Canada)
Rick Ezekiel (settler ally)
Measuring Indigenous student experiences in universities: Culturally appropriate methodologies and key findings

Indigenous Women's Leadership

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28117 Indigenous Women's Leadership 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday veeshayne patuwai (Ngapuhi,Aotearoa (New Zealand)) Urutapu - A rite of passage. Leadership for indigenous young women
28118 Indigenous Women's Leadership 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Shelley Hoani (Waikato, Tainui / Ngāti Mākino, Te Arawa,New Zealand) Learner - Lover - Indigenous 'Other'

Ilisagvik College

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28099 Ilisagvik College 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Pearl Brower (USA)
Jerica Aamodt (Inupiaq Eskimo,USA)
Tennessee Judkins (Inupiaq Eskimo,USA)
Ilisagvik College- Alaska's Only Tribal College Engraining Indigenous Culture into Curriclum and Administration
28100 Ilisagvik College 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Pearl Brower (USA)
Jerica Aamodt (Inupiaq Eskimo,USA)
Birgit Meany ()
Iḷisaġvigmi Iḷisaqtuat Piḷḷautaġuurut Iñuuniaġusivut Paamaaġikł̣ugich Iḷisaqamiŋ Cultural Connections Foster Student Success at Iḷisaġvik College

Pakirehua - Celebrating inquiry through indigenous epistemologies

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27536 Pakirehua - Celebrating inquiry through indigenous epistemologies 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Tammy Gardiner (Māori,New Zeland)
Marama Reweti - Martin (Māori,New Zealand)
Celebrating inquiry through indigenous epistemologies - Mā te ruku, mā te wānanga, mā te kōrero, mā te aro atu, mā te wetewete e whakamārama ai te upoko o te kaupapa Pakirehua (inquiry) provides a model of cultural resilience for teaching as inquiry from an indigenous worldview. From a Māori perspective Pakirehua (inquiry) has always been and is what Māori have always done, it's part of our DNA. Ancestors, tīpuna show the way for us; their stories, experiences and knowledge are a natural part of understanding how we (as Māori) inquire, are curious and solve problems. Pakirehua is evident in indigenous practices such as astronomy, transport, navigation, horticulture and food gathering

Indigenous Knowledge in Action, Harnessing the Power of the Elements

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27598 Indigenous Knowledge in Action, Harnessing the Power of the Elements 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Curtis Bristowe (Aotearoa/New Zealand, Ngāti Porou, Te Whānau a Apanui, Te Aitanga a Māhaki) My workshop is focused upon attempting to define and determine the foundations of an Indigenous knowledge system, and then upon definition revitalising those foundations via a strategic framework for effective application in a contemporary context . Such an approach is founded upon the belief that what we are lacking in the Māori world is not the quantity of Māori knowledge; there is a veritable plethora of Māori knowledge still available. My research will seek to demonstrate that what is lacking is quality contemporary thought that yields "reflection" contained in that knowledge, i.e., appropriate insight into their contemporary application.

Indigenous Pathways to Health: Traditional Practices, Foods and Medicine

Topic:

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27693 Indigenous Pathways to Health: Traditional Practices, Foods and Medicine 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Suzanne Brant (Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte) This presentation will explore Indigenous cultural practices, medicines and foods that will create a pathway to healthier people and communities. It will provide an increased awareness and understanding of traditional healing practices and science supporting the use of traditional foods and medicines. It will examine traditional gathering practices including the natural and spiritual laws governing when, where, and how to gather foods and medicine. It will demonstrate how incorporating traditional foods and plant medicine into our current lifestyle can increase our health and the prevent disease. It will bring together science and Indigenous knowledge in a way that will benefit all.

Expanding language domains, emphasizing language use and building literacy using technology, media arts and the Master-Apprentice method.

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27558 Expanding language domains, emphasizing language use and building literacy using technology, media arts and the Master-Apprentice method. 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Odadrihonyanihsoh (Sara) General (Hodinohsoni,Kanien'keha)
Roronhiakehte Deer (Hodinohsoni,Kanien'keha)
One of the key challenges in reversing language shift, is using the language outside of traditional domains (such as the classroom). To be language users, as well as speakers. In this workshop we discuss our experiences expanding language domains by targeting transitional and non-traditional settings as spaces to optimize language use. We also share our experiences working with current technology and archival materials to create art and new media (comics and short stories) that build literacy and increase opportunities for using language in the home. Finally, we discuss our application of the Master-Apprentice method and share the results of our home-based program.

The Original Instructions our children learn

Topic: Indigenous Pedagogy

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27540 The Original Instructions our children learn 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Callie Hill (Kanyenkehaka,Canada/Kanyenkeha/Kanyenkehaka)
Melissa Maracle (Kanyenkehaka,Canada/Kanyenkeha/Kanyenkehaka)
Kawenna’ón:we Primary Immersion is a private school for children Kindergarten to Grade 4 and is dedicated to regenerating Mohawk ways of being, knowing and doing; providing educational opportunities to strengthen the minds and spirits of our children; and preparing the children to be active and thriving citizens. The foundation of the school curriculum is based on the worldview of the Rotinonhsyon:ni (People of the Longhouse), instilling a positive self-identity in the children. This workshop will discuss and demonstrate how the teachers are regenerating language and cultural pride to our youngest generation, an opportunity that many of us were denied.

INDIGENOUS CORN MODEL: Connecting A University leadership program with Indigenous based community Projects to promote Spiritual, Mental, Physical, and Social well being

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27688 INDIGENOUS CORN MODEL: Connecting A University leadership program with Indigenous based community Projects to promote Spiritual, Mental, Physical, and Social well being 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Shawn Secatero (Canoncito Band of Navajo,United States) As part of honoring indigenous ways of knowing, the Indigenous Corn Model in Education and Leadership is a 12 year dissertation study that evolved through the teachings of elders, scholars, and knowledge keepers. This holistic based model connects four main wellness quadrants that include spiritual, mental, physical, and social well-being attributes. In addition, participants will be introduced to 16 wellness pillars which recognizes their inner strengths, resources, challenges, plan of action, and follow-up activities. A special emphasis will be placed on utilizing four community action based projects to promote well-being and leadership in their schools and communities.

Responding to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) Call to Action: Educating Health Professionals on Indigenous Health in Canada

Topic:

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27381 Responding to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) Call to Action: Educating Health Professionals on Indigenous Health in Canada 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Dr. Margo Greenwood (Cree)
Dr. Kent Saylor (Mohawk,Kahnawake First Nation)
Dr. Sarah de Leewu ()
Donna Atkinson ()
Drawing upon the TRC’s Calls to Action to close the health gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians, and years of community-based research, this panel will present innovative, supportive, experiential, and reflective curricula and methods currently being used to educate non-Indigenous medical and health care students. These unique approaches to Indigenous health education aim to increase the cultural competence among future health professionals who will be working with Indigenous peoples, families and communities in Canada.

The Workabout Centre - Pathways to training, employment and higher education

Topic: Nationhood & Sustainability

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27513 The Workabout Centre - Pathways to training, employment and higher education 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Natasha Chisholm (Aboriginal,Australian Aboriginal - Narungga)
Joanne Ruddy (non-Aboriginal,British)
Developed by the Aboriginal Education Directorate, Department for Education and Child Development (DECD), The Workabout Centre is an innovative, integrated model for connecting Aboriginal young people with pathways that lead post-secondary training, higher education and others that lead to sustainable employment. Our workshop will showcase our student-centred learning approach, opportunities our partnerships have created for our Aboriginal students and community and highlight the practical strategies used to engage, empower and support our Aboriginal young people to make positive choices, set high expectations for themselves and plan achievable training and employment goals.

Moving in the Circle: Indigenous Resources at University of Toronto Libraries

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27453 Moving in the Circle: Indigenous Resources at University of Toronto Libraries 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Jackie Esquimaux-Hamlin (Aundeck Omni Kaning, Canada)
Desmond Wong (Aundeck Omni Kaning, Canada)
Sara McDowell (Aundeck Omni Kaning, Canada)
What does reconciliation mean to academic libraries in serving students and the community at large? Librarians must challenge the inherent hegemonic structures built within our institutions. Representatives from the First Nations House Resource Centre, Robarts and Ontario Institute for the Studies in Education Libraries will discuss how they are working to support resilience and reconciliation. We recognize the need for indigenous-centered spaces, collections that reflect the diversity of voices through oral histories, indigenous languages, publishers, authors and non-book materials, as well as efforts to promote diversity in the collections and staff.

Closing the Early Childhood Education gap in Native Hawaiian communities

Topic: Lifelong Learning

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27452 Closing the Early Childhood Education gap in Native Hawaiian communities 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Michelle Mahuka (Native Hawaiian,Hawai'i/Native Hawaiian)
Maile Keliipio-Acoba (Native Hawaiian,Hawaii)
Sanoe Marfil (Native Hawaiian,Hawaii)
Hele mai! Come and join us! Hear about how two INPEACE programs, Ho‘?la and K?lia & Ka Lama Education Academy (KKLEA) are working together to close the early childhood education gap for Native Hawaiian children by increasing the number of Native Hawaiians enrolling in preschools and increasing the quality of ECE programming throughout the community. Participant recruitment involves innovative approaches to outreach efforts, individualized assistance and community resources. Through professional development opportunities and supports, our Grow-your-own approach develops teachers from within our predominantly Native Hawaiian community. Through our combined efforts, early learning program enrollments, teacher retention and community empowerment has increase over time.

Akaltyirreme nthenhele apeke': Renewing the push for Arrernte education in central Australia

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27443 Akaltyirreme nthenhele apeke': Renewing the push for Arrernte education in central Australia 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Lilly Alexander (non-Indigenous,Northern Territory, Australia) Felicity Hayes (Central Arrernte,Central Arrernte, Northern Territory, Australia)
Mel Kean (non-Indigenous,Northern Territory, Australia)
Irrkerlantye (White Gate) is a town camp 3km from the centre of Mparntwe (Alice Springs) in central Australia. Once thriving, it exists without mains power, town water or access to sewerage and now has just two permanent residents, Arrernte elders and native title holders Felicity and Basil Hayes. Irrkerlantye is now the sight of a renewed push to establish a model of education that privileges Arrernte language, culture and land: Children's Ground. Children's Ground's first Arrernte employee, Felicity Hayes, shares her journey of resisting assimilation, disrupting the system and renewing the push for education by Arrernte families for Arrernte children on Arrernte land.

Coastal First Nations Dance Festival: 50 years of revitalization of dance from the Northwest coast

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27476 Coastal First Nations Dance Festival: 50 years of revitalization of dance from the Northwest coast 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Margaret Grenier (Canada)
Nigel Grenier ()
Rebecca Doughty ()
In 2017, the 10th annual Coastal First Nations Dance Festival will celebrate the resilience of Northwest Coast dance over the last five decades. The festival’s predecessor was an annual celebration that began 50 years ago, as one of the key first initiatives to bring back song and dance after the lifting of the Potlatch Ban. The ban attacked the cultures of Indigenous peoples, as well as the intergenerational learning processes through which knowledge, practices, and identity are passed forward, silencing the songs and immobilizing the dances of the Northwest Coast. This presentation will tell a story that demonstrates the resiliency that has carried these practices forward.

Including Indigenous knowledge in science education: Impacts on achievement, identity, and attitudes toward science

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27628 Including Indigenous knowledge in science education: Impacts on achievement, identity, and attitudes toward science 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Jeff Baker (Canada/Métis)
Tamica Small ()
Contemporary science education is not meeting the needs of Indigenous learners. Hence, few Indigenous people pursue careers in science, limiting sovereignty efforts and contributions of Indigenous knowledge to scientific endeavors. In this session participants will discuss a study that provided professional development to eight elementary (Gr. 4-8) teachers and paired each with an elder or knowledge keeper to include Indigenous knowledge in their science teaching over a four month period. Evidence was gathered from Indigenous and non-Indigenous students regarding impacts on achievement, identity, and attitudes toward science. Please join us to offer your insights into this critical work.

A Lost Generation: Identity stories and journeys of Maori

Topic: Child Welfare

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27630 A Lost Generation: Identity stories and journeys of Maori 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Jenni Tupu (Māori,Aotearoa (New Zealand)) There are many stories buried in the dark corners of Aotearoa New Zealand's history where the practice of solving the social 'problem' of illegitimacy saw approximately 80,000 children given up for adoption during the closed stranger adoption period 1955-1985.10,000 of these were Maori who were disconnected from their cultural identity and raised in western families, raised apart from their heritage and cultural communities. This research investigates and listens to these stories and identity journeys, considering them as a life long event that began at birth and have for some, continued into the next generation/s.Some adoptees have spent a lifetime seeking the cultural education of what it means to be a Maori and indigenous to Aotearoa New Zealand. The resilience of many Maori adoptees has shown courage and emotional stamina in a life long journey of identity and seeking being able to belong.

Student Work Study-First Nations, Metis and Inuit

Topic: Partnerships in Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27694 Student Work Study-First Nations, Metis and Inuit 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Suzie Miller (Six Nations of the Grand River Territory) The presenter will share the experience of the Ontario Ministry of Education initiative of Student Work Study with a First Nations, Metis and Inuit focus. This was a 3 year initiative that coincided with a First Nations, Metis and Inuit Collaborative Inquiry with Grand ErieDSB. The qualitative data will be shared and will inspire others to seek to include Indigenous perspectives in the classroom. The impact of modeling ways of bringing student voice forward and the power of the talking circle in fulfilling the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual needs of students will be explored. The well-being of the environment is the foundation of inquiry based learning.

Language Revitalization Progress: Kodiak Island

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27566 Language Revitalization Progress: Kodiak Island 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Teri Schneider (Sugpiaq,United States)
Marya Halvorsen ()
Until recently, Kodiak Alutiiq families had no access to early childhood Alutiiq language immersion education, nor did existing courses offer a cohesive progression to Alutiiq proficiency. The Tamamta Liitukut Project is designed to cultivate Kodiak Alutiiq language education by increasing the proficiency of preschool children and their families through immersion instruction. They will develop an Alutiiq Language Nest, strengthen community engagement, and supports elementary through college level language classes. The presentation offers an overview of their history, project, and group discussion.

Treaty Co-Governance In action - Benefits and Challenges of Shared Decision Making

Topic: Governance

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27572 Treaty Co-Governance In action - Benefits and Challenges of Shared Decision Making 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Kataraina O'Brien (Ngati Awa Tribe Aotearoa/New Zealand,Aotearoa/New Zealand)
Tuwhakairiora O'Brien (Ngati Awa Tribe Aotearoa/New Zealand,Aotearoa/New Zealand)
In Aotearoa/NZ many tribes are seeking cultural redress that enables shared decision making for the management of natural resources, especially rivers, lakes and harbours. Several Treaty co-governance fora (via joint council committees) have been established in the Bay of Plenty region of NZ. The workshop draws on the challenges and value of integrating cultural perspectives and protocols, into traditional council processes - both of which are seeking the same environmental outcomes - improved water quality. Building enduring relationships with Treaty partners is key. Two presenters, one from Council and one from iwi will provide insight into the value/challenges of this emerging landscape.

Indigenous Practitioners in the Academic Space

Topic: Indigenous Research Methodology & Praxis

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27568 Indigenous Practitioners in the Academic Space 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Hohepa Tamehana (Aotearoa)
Tina Fraser (M?ORI,New Zealand)
He Waka Hiringa, is a Master’s program that was developed by Te Wananga ō Aotearoa and rolled out as a pilot in 2013. It is a two-year program aimed at acknowledging practitioners who have worked tirelessly to provide support to their communities. He Waka Hiringa brings lived, grounded, and experiential knowledge into the academic space to re-write what has been written about them and their practices by 'non-Maori/non-practicing' researchers.

Away from Base Midwifery - Strengthening Student Support

Topic:

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27533 Away from Base Midwifery - Strengthening Student Support 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Kate Wragge (Aboriginal Australian,Australia)
Machellee Kosiak (Aboriginal Australian,Australian)
The AFB BMid program is a small, innovative course designed to prepare Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women to work as graduate midwives in their home communities. An increase in the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the maternity workforce able to work in their home communities is an Australian workforce priority and a key imperative that drives the need for success with the AFB BMid program.

Ignite Session 25: Culturally Responsive Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 15:00-15:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27830 Ignite Session 25: Culturally Responsive Education 03:00 PM 03:15 PM Wednesday Engaging Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledges, pedagogies and curriculum
27831 Ignite Session 25: Culturally Responsive Education 03:15 PM 03:30 PM Wednesday A Kaupapa Maori Examination of Science Education
27832 Ignite Session 25: Culturally Responsive Education 03:30 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Clontarf Aboriginal College - 3 Ways of Learning

Ignite Session 13: Culturally Responsive Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 15:00-15:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27794 Ignite Session 13: Culturally Responsive Education 03:00 PM 03:15 PM Wednesday The importance of Cultural Education in the Australian education system.
27795 Ignite Session 13: Culturally Responsive Education 03:15 PM 03:30 PM Wednesday Localising Aboriginal Cultural Education in New South Wales, Australia.
27796 Ignite Session 13: Culturally Responsive Education 03:30 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Te Ara Whakamua – The pathway forward

Ignite Session 19: Culturally Responsive Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 15:00-15:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27812 Ignite Session 19: Culturally Responsive Education 03:00 PM 03:15 PM Wednesday Resilience and reclamation; creating educational choices that work for Maori learners in Aotearoa- New Zealand.
27813 Ignite Session 19: Culturally Responsive Education 03:15 PM 03:30 PM Wednesday Matauranga, Talanoa and Taokotai: Knowledge, conversation and Collaboration
27814 Ignite Session 19: Culturally Responsive Education 03:30 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday An Integrative Culture-Based Approach to Teaching: One School's Journey Toward Change

Ignite Session 45: Innovations in Indigenous Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 15:00-15:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27890 Ignite Session 45: Innovations in Indigenous Education 03:00 PM 03:15 PM Wednesday Indigenous Participation in Technological Futures
27891 Ignite Session 45: Innovations in Indigenous Education 03:15 PM 03:30 PM Wednesday Samoan Language Tech Camp: Merging Traditional Storytelling and Modern Day Technology

Ignite Session 54: Partnerships in Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 15:00-15:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27917 Ignite Session 54: Partnerships in Education 03:00 PM 03:15 PM Wednesday Be the Best You Can Be community engagement and wellbeing program
27918 Ignite Session 54: Partnerships in Education 03:15 PM 03:30 PM Wednesday The Turning Tide
27919 Ignite Session 54: Partnerships in Education 03:30 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Building Sustainability Pathways Program

Ignite Session 80: Culturally Responsive Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 15:00-15:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27995 Ignite Session 80: Culturally Responsive Education 03:00 PM 03:15 PM Wednesday Educational Design and Native Aspiration: Engaging for Substantive Change
27996 Ignite Session 80: Culturally Responsive Education 03:15 PM 03:30 PM Wednesday First Nations House, University of Toronto: 25 Years of Resiliency
27997 Ignite Session 80: Culturally Responsive Education 03:30 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Building Communities of Educational Practice in Diverse and Disperse Populations

Fun, interactive ways to teach YOUR Native language using handheld devices

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28356 Fun, interactive ways to teach YOUR Native language using handheld devices 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Don Thornton (Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma,USA)
Kara Thornton (Singapore)
Bring your language to life using animated characters that respond to touch using mobile devices. Come experience "Maskosis Goes to School", an exciting interactive storybook to teach YOUR language. We use animated 'hot-spots', voices of fluent speakers, and other methods to help demystify language patterns, verb conjugations, tenses, kinship relations and cultural values. It's highly interactive and creative and is adaptable to any language/culture. Come join Maskosis and his Cree family as they show you this new way of learning. Thornton Media has worked with over 200 Native communities, including our host, Six Nations Polytechnic (Speak Cayuga App). Visit our workshop to experience it!

Strengthening Young Inuit Male Identity

Topic: Health & Wellness

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28380 Strengthening Young Inuit Male Identity 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday My paper focuses on young Inuit male identity and how it is formed, shaped and sustained among Nunavummiut. Research was conducted by holding kitchen table talks with three different groups.Group one included male Elders.Group 2 included the parents of three young men.The last group included the three young men. The discussions with the three groups identified people,projects and supports that enabled the young men to become successful healthy contributors in our society. The key factors identified as promoting success were relationships,hands-on activities that can be culturally relevant but reinforce and strengthen identity. The final factor was education, either formal or informal.

Teaching Ancient concepts through Contemporary Arts

Topic: Arts

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28427 Teaching Ancient concepts through Contemporary Arts 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Wednesday Maile Naehu (Hawaii,USA)
Hanohano Naehu (Hawaii,USA)
Kapili'ula Naehu (Kanaka Maoli ,Hawaii)
As modern issues arise within our communities and natural resources , we must remind ourselves of our inherited responsibilities to nurture them.The answers that we search for to address modern day issues lie in the knowledge of our oral traditions and practices. By integrating traditional concepts with hands on experiences in Ocean and land coupled with oral tradition and the Arts it allows the audience to listen and ponder upon the ingenuity of ancient wisdoms in a space where the mind is open and heart receptive. These messages must be heard and shared with the world in order to create stewardship and understanding of place and purpose. We will share how we have accomplished this.

Using Our Strengths for Economic Well-Being and Resilence

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27535 Using Our Strengths for Economic Well-Being and Resilence 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Dr. C Kanoelani Naone (Native Hawaiian,United States)
Maile Keliipio-Acoba (Native Hawaiian,United States)
Economics play a large role in well-being. Our project builds upon the strengths, skills and ancestral talents of Native Hawaiians and combines them with databases, technology and business acumen to create sustainable income in, for, and by community. Learn about our new entrepreneurial program that fosters resilience and is a demonstration of the resilience of our people. We will take you through create sessions for a hand experience that will engage, expand your thinking and hopefully spur ideas in you that you can take back to your community to generate income. Learn how to continually spark innovation in your organization. Video, activities and discussion will ensure no one nods off!

Ako Ako Is It Tere!

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27616 Ako Ako Is It Tere! 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Georgina Paikea (New Zealand Māori) Ako Whakatere is the major reason for the success of Te Ara Reo Māori (Post-secondary Māori language programme for second language learners); a combined effect between traditional Māori learning (Ako) and western paradigms (Accelerated Learning - Whakatere). At the core of this pedagogy are philosophies that focus on understanding the learner’s way of knowing, which then determines how the material is delivered. The mental wellbeing of the learner is central to its success and anyone can succeed. For the past 10 years I have seen how Ako Whakatere transforms its learners. This to me is resilience and this workshop celebrates this achievement in a practical, exciting and ‘Ako Whakatere’ way.

Bidwewidam Indigenous Masculinities: Reconciling Gender Relations

Topic:

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27555 Bidwewidam Indigenous Masculinities: Reconciling Gender Relations 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Kim Anderson (Metis,Canada, Metis)
Robert Innes (University of Guelph,Canada, Plains Cree)
Reconciliation is often framed as a process between Indigenous and settler populations, with question arising about rebuilding a relationship that “never was.” But what about reconciling relationships within family and community? Until recently, there has been very little research about reconciling the position of men in Indigenous families and communities, nor about reconciling the relations between the multiples genders we once knew. This presentation will share the findings of the Bidwewidam Indigenous masculinities project, in which Indigenous people across Canada talked about men, masculinities, and the related learning and knowledge transfer that can contribute to community wellness.

Manu TÅ« Rangatira - The Plume Of My Identity

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27684 Manu Tū Rangatira - The Plume Of My Identity 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Romana Tekaharoa Potts (Aotearoa(NZ), Ngāti Kurī, Māori) From Aotearoa our Manu (our chiefly birds) over thousands of years developed systems of ultimate survival. From ancient lines these unique manu, like my own ancestors have survived from the mists of time till now. This is an interactive workshop I developed as a Tutor in Maori language and dance, weaving the qualities of these manu with ancient cultural values and lores to hold on to our continuity of consciousness, so it will never ever be lost. The resilience of our ancient knowledge passed down to the ancestors survived by being embedded in the footwork of our manu. This learning style allows us today to walk the talk of these Manu Tū Rangatira, the plume of my identity.

Weaving Indigenous knowledge into the academy: Promises and challenges from the perspectives of three Aboriginal post-secondary institutions in British Columbia

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27609 Weaving Indigenous knowledge into the academy: Promises and challenges from the perspectives of three Aboriginal post-secondary institutions in British Columbia 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Dr. Rheanna Robinson (Métis,Canada) From my doctoral research, this workshop will examine the promises and challenges of integrating Indigenous Knowledge (IK) into the academy from the perspectives of Elders, leaders, students, staff, and instructors from three Aboriginal post-secondary institutions in British Columbia. We will discuss the perceived successes, limitations, and challenges the Nicola Valley Institute of Technology, the Wilp Wilxo'oskwhl Nisga’a Institute, and the former Cariboo Chilcotin Weekend University program face, or have faced, in the integration of IK. To represent my position as a Métis scholar, findings from the research will be discussed through the framework of the Métis Sash.

Māori Social Work Degree Embedded in Māori Values

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27624 Māori Social Work Degree Embedded in Māori Values 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Alma Winiata-Kenny () Te Wānanga o Raukawa is a Māori tertiary educational institution. We deliver an undergraduate degree in Social Work which focuses on achieving Māori wellbeing. The expression of kaupapa tuku iho (values inherited by Māori ancestors) is fundamental to our institution and the design of this degree covers the range of values that we think are necessary in order to achieve Māori wellbeing. A theory of Māori wellbeing can be described as, “a Māori state of being that is characterised by the abundant expression of kaupapa tuku iho”. To illustrate what this means in practice, four degree graduates were interviewed, their stories as practitioners documented and the findings will be presented.

Indigenous Women Filmmakers in Canada: Indigenous Women Creating Echoes from the Center InNiNiNew IsKweWak KaKioChiTat KaPaSwePaNik AnTa TeTaWitCh

Topic: Arts

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27636 Indigenous Women Filmmakers in Canada: Indigenous Women Creating Echoes from the Center InNiNiNew IsKweWak KaKioChiTat KaPaSwePaNik AnTa TeTaWitCh 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Jules Koostachin (Canada) Research has emerged devoted to the practice of indigenizing media, these studies have proven that media plays a key role in the emergence of social change, both from within our communities and beyond. My studies explore the significant roles of Indigenous women documentary filmmakers that expose national histories by allowing Indigenous subjects of inquiry to speak for themselves, and underscoring women’s experiences through an intimate style that meshes personal and community voices. There has been a shift in the nature of films that form indigenous storytelling; there is now a greater range of creative multi-media approaches to sharing our stories led by Indigenous women.

65,000 Years in 45 Minutes

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27633 65,000 Years in 45 Minutes 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday John Patten (Aboriginal Australian,Bundjalung, Yorta Yorta) How can an educator provide to their audiences a meaningful introduction to the cultural diversity of Australia’s First Peoples, highlighting 65,000 years of history within the space of 60 minutes? In this talk John Patten, Manager of Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre at Melbourne Museum will highlight Bunjilaka’s work in helping to meet the needs of primary and secondary school teachers and their students in addressing Indigenous focused content within the Australian curriculum.

Double discrimination confronting Indigenous students in Ontario’s publicly funded francophone schools

Topic: Public Education for Reconciliation

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27657 Double discrimination confronting Indigenous students in Ontario’s publicly funded francophone schools 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Marie Marion (Canada) Ontario's First Nation, Métis and Inuit policy framework is published in both English and French, as schooling is offered to provincially funded schools in these languages. This workshop will look at both documents, providing an analysis of the English document, which will then be compared to the French document, revealing the differences between the two. The comparison will reveal social justice issues inherent in the documents, which are used throughout Ontario. It will then look at Ontario's FNMI Policy Framework in light of the Truth and Reconciliation Committee's Calls to Action.

The challenges to teach heritage ethnolinguistics within early childhood education in Aotearoa New Zealand

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27412 The challenges to teach heritage ethnolinguistics within early childhood education in Aotearoa New Zealand 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Ngaroma Williams (Tangata whenua o Aotearoa New Zealand - NZ Māori)
Rikke Betts (Danish,Denmark)
Christine Williams (Ngāi Tahu iwi,Tangata whenua o Aotearoa New Zealand - NZ Māori)
In Aotearoa New Zealand learning te reo Māori without the cultural framework in which it exists is like cooking authentic cuisine without any genuine ingredients, meaning you lose the essence of a language and its cultural significance. Over the past two decades research still reveals that teachers have found it challenging to deliver bicultural content, some teachers argue that te reo Māori can be learnt devoid of culture (tikanga) for mere functional or academic purposes, so what this means is that you will end up with the ability to function in the language as an outsider at a minimal level and have no real appreciation for the people who use the language.

The Different Names of Mosesie Qappik

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27658 The Different Names of Mosesie Qappik 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Mary Etuangat (Inuit,Nunavut) In the mid-twentieth century, the forced relocation of Inuit from small hunting and fishing camps to larger, more central settlements shattered the longstanding ways of known and being that had defined relationships between people and their environment (Qikiqtani Truth Commission, 2010; Nunavut Tungavik Incorporated, 2012). Incorporating family trees, oral history and vivid autobiographical narrative, I explore the impact of this relocation in the eastern Qikiqtani region on my immediate and extended family. I conclude with the need for healing and the promise that it can happen.

Tribal Nation Building through Tribal College Faculty Development: The American Indian College Fund’s Tribal College Faculty Fellowships, Research Journal and Research Convening

Topic: Nationhood & Sustainability

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27666 Tribal Nation Building through Tribal College Faculty Development: The American Indian College Fund’s Tribal College Faculty Fellowships, Research Journal and Research Convening 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Natalie Youngbull (Cheyenne & Arapaho/Assiniboine & Sioux,Cheyenne & Arapaho/Assiniboine & Sioux) The American Indian College Fund (AICF) seeks to offer students access to knowledge, skills, and cultural values that enhance their communities. A current strategy to accomplish this mission is through faculty development at Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs). Through the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP), AICF offers three fellowship opportunities for TCU faculty to obtain a Master’s or Doctorate degree. By enabling TCU faculty to attain graduate and terminal degrees, AICF is helping to improve the intellectual capacity, thereby positioning TCUs to develop new programs, degrees, and services to better serve their communities.

Reaching back to go forwards

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27703 Reaching back to go forwards 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Thomas Tarurongo Wynne (Ngati Ingatu/Ngati Kaena,Enuamanu and Rarotonga - Avaiki Nui (Cook Islands)) Nana’o ia to’ou pakiri e te tama irokoreia, Ei’itiki’anga mai I te korero a to ui Tupuna, Ei’akaepaepa’anga na’au, Ei kavaeinga no te tuatau ki mua. - Tattoo your skin, firstborn child, With the words of your ancestors, Reaching into your past, For a compass into the future . Their is an understanding for us Maori in Avaiki Nui (Cook Islands) that tatau or the ancient marking of our skin, is a way for us to reach into our past and find the compass that will help us find our way forward. This ancient ritual marking our bodies told a story as tatau literally means to read.This and Vaka voyaging by the stars are compasses that self determine us and our way forward. The tools are all around us

Disrupting and Resisting Artistic Terra Nullius; The Ways Aboriginal Australian Women Speak Back Through Art

Topic: Arts

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27671 Disrupting and Resisting Artistic Terra Nullius; The Ways Aboriginal Australian Women Speak Back Through Art 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Paola Balla (Wemba-Wemba & Gundjitmara Peoples,Australia) Celebrating the diverse ways that Sovereign Aboriginal women visual artists, writers & protectors express and respond to justice, land rights, violence, (both historical and current), ecology, sovereignty, treaty and assert matriarchal and cultural maintenance in the face of colonial oppression. Includes visual art, literature and an invitation to speak with with local Aboriginal women artists.

Protecting Intellectual Property through Māori epistemology

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27638 Protecting Intellectual Property through Māori epistemology 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Julia Steenson (New Zealand) This workshop will explore ideologies on intellectual property through the lens of Māori epistemology. What Māori mythology relates to the concepts of intellectual property? Legends have survived generations and continue to edify Māori through resilience and relevance. Knowledge of local flora healing properties were passed from my Aunty to my mother to benefit future generations of our whānau (family). Māori, while sharing stories and cultural knowledge have endeavoured to protect the “value” of important creations. This workshop creates space for discussing just how intellectual property viewed through Māori epistemology might aid the ongoing resilience and survival of Mātauranga Māori.

Navigating change - Te Wānanga o Aotearoa and its response to New Zealand’s Tertiary Targeted Review of 'Qualifications.

Topic: Governance

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27643 Navigating change - Te Wānanga o Aotearoa and its response to New Zealand’s Tertiary Targeted Review of 'Qualifications. 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Kelly Miriata Tauroa (Maori,Aotearoa New Zealand) Te Wānanga o Aotearoa is in the midst of reclaiming & reframing its position through the Targeted Review of Qualifications. A deliverer of more than 120 qualifications, and over 30,000 students in 2016, Te Wānanga o Aotearoa is a renowned indigenous, multi-sited, crown funded tertiary provider that is undertaking a massive agenda to review all of its programmes in order to align with a new set of qualifications. But why has it chosen to participate in this government agenda and is this the only driver?This workshop explores the tensions, compromises, and responses taken to date by Te Wānanga o Aotearoa to reclaim and reframe its approach in order to progress towards a much greater vision.

The Medicine Horse Way: A Return to Wellness for Indigenous and First Nations Peoples

Topic:

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27561 The Medicine Horse Way: A Return to Wellness for Indigenous and First Nations Peoples 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Yvette Running Horse Collin (Nakota & Cheyenne ,United States of America)
Sean Collin (Cherokee,U.S.A.)
The concept of "Spirit Horse Medicine” has played an important role within many Indigenous societies/cultures throughout the Americas for thousands of years. Despite the fact that the Dominant culture claims credit for introducing the horse to the Native Peoples and that government policies nearly exterminated the Indigenous Horse of the Americas, many of our Elders have preserved valuable history and traditional knowledge regarding the spiritual practices surrounding the horse. In this workshop the history of the horse and its relationship with Native Peoples will be discussed, and an explanation of "Horse Medicine” provided. Workshop participants will learn how this knowledge it is being utilized once again within Native communities today.

Treaties in Canada: Education Promises and Conflicts

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27562 Treaties in Canada: Education Promises and Conflicts 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Chris Scribe (Treaty 6, Canada)
Sheila Carr-Stewart ()
The British Crown and First Nations met and agreed to Treaties from the Maritime Peace and Friendship Treaties 1750s to the Numbered Treaties 1871-1923. Days and weeks were spent in discussing the Treaties but language, culture, and colonialism resulted in two understandings of the Treaties. The Crown agreed to provide western education and at the same time committed to ensure that western education did not "deter" from Indigenous education. The Crown provided only limited educational services through the 1876 Indian Act. This research looks at the lack of the Crown's commitment to provide quality Treaty education services and 150 years of second class educational services.

Strengthening Resilience: training & supporting social service work in Indigenous communities

Topic: Public Education for Reconciliation

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27563 Strengthening Resilience: training & supporting social service work in Indigenous communities 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Cheyenne Chartrand (Ebb & Flow First Nation Manitoba)
Sherry Gott (Cree,Sapoteweyak Cree Nation)
Indigenous support programs in education and social service operate in an environment different from mainstream. Indigenous Student Support & Community Relations at Red River College developed a program to address this difference & incorporates cultural values, Elders in post secondary institutions and Indigenous ways of knowing with today's realities including Child Welfare systems, Family Violence, residential schools and inter-generational trauma. This workshop will provide participants with tools they can use to develop or implement aspects of the program according to their agency/community needs.

Two-Spirit Gifts & Medicines: a (re)learning & (re)claiming respect and honour

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27620 Two-Spirit Gifts & Medicines: a (re)learning & (re)claiming respect and honour 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Harlan Pruden (First Nation Cree/nēhiyaw,Turtle Island/Canada/First Nation Cree/nēhiyaw) Many cultural traditions and practices of the peoples of Turtle Island have often been misrepresented or suppressed. This especially holds true for indigenous notions and practices of sex, gender, gender-roles and sexuality. This presentation explores these concepts by featuring some of the sociohistorical documentation from a nation-specific standpoint while supplementing these records and narratives with deconstructed colonial accounts. A brief overview is offered on how this burgeoning body of knowledge is used to (re)lean and (re)claim respect, honor and dignity for Two-Spirit individuals and communities as they navigate and negotiate Aboriginal and LGBTQI spaces, places and communities.

Ignite Session 68: Culturally Responsive Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 16:00-16:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27959 Ignite Session 68: Culturally Responsive Education 04:00 PM 04:15 PM Wednesday Kurduboodjar – Place-based Thinking in South West Australia
27960 Ignite Session 68: Culturally Responsive Education 04:15 PM 04:30 PM Wednesday Considering Collaborative Indigenous Research and Educational Praxis in Ethical Relationality to Place
27961 Ignite Session 68: Culturally Responsive Education 04:30 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday "Connecting Educational Communities to Engage in Collective Inquiry: Creating Professional Learning Communities as Sites of Action Research"

Ignite Session 108: Indigenous Pedagogy - Wednesday, July 26th - 16:00-16:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
28079 Ignite Session 108: Indigenous Pedagogy 04:00 PM 04:15 PM Wednesday HIGHER EDUCATION AND US MOB - CREATING A SOLID COOLAMON OF SUPPORT
28080 Ignite Session 108: Indigenous Pedagogy 04:15 PM 04:30 PM Wednesday The attitudes and beliefs of the academic towards embedding Indigenous perspectives in Initial Teacher Education programmes
28081 Ignite Session 108: Indigenous Pedagogy 04:30 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Anishinaabe and American Elementary Education Teacher Preparation

Ignite Session 94: Indigenous Pedagogy - Wednesday, July 26th - 16:00-16:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
28037 Ignite Session 94: Indigenous Pedagogy 04:00 PM 04:15 PM Wednesday Our right, our responsibility: Indigenous education by Indigenous scholars
28038 Ignite Session 94: Indigenous Pedagogy 04:15 PM 04:30 PM Wednesday The Kenanow Learning Model - Teacher Education for "All of Us"
28039 Ignite Session 94: Indigenous Pedagogy 04:30 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday The Importance of Indigenous Knowledge in Australian pre-service teacher education - a PhD study

Ignite Session 95: Culturally Responsive Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 16:00-16:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
28040 Ignite Session 95: Culturally Responsive Education 04:00 PM 04:15 PM Wednesday Building Resilience in Inuit and Yup'ik Educators
28041 Ignite Session 95: Culturally Responsive Education 04:15 PM 04:30 PM Wednesday Developing and assessing cultural competency among Australian educators
28042 Ignite Session 95: Culturally Responsive Education 04:30 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday How experienced Mi'kmaw educators encourage resilience and shape emerging identities of Mi'kmaw pre-service teachers

: Innovations in Indigenous Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 16:00-16:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27893 : Innovations in Indigenous Education 04:00 PM 04:15 PM Wednesday Te Taunga ika o Tamahana - Fishing with Mathematics
27894 : Innovations in Indigenous Education 04:15 PM 04:30 PM Wednesday blended learning in core Aboriginal units
27895 : Innovations in Indigenous Education 04:30 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday College Prep in Six Weeks? It can be accomplished with a Board Game Strategy in the classroom

Ignite Session 65: Culturally Responsive Education - Wednesday, July 26th - 16:00-16:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27950 Ignite Session 65: Culturally Responsive Education 04:00 PM 04:15 PM Wednesday "He Urunga Tu" An entrance to Engagement
27951 Ignite Session 65: Culturally Responsive Education 04:15 PM 04:30 PM Wednesday AAA Education: Awareness, Advocacy, and Action in Indigenous Education
27952 Ignite Session 65: Culturally Responsive Education 04:30 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Te Tuakiri o te tangata - Beyond the skin of man

Culturally Responsive Inclusion of Metis Content and Perspectives in an Urban Setting

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28225 Culturally Responsive Inclusion of Metis Content and Perspectives in an Urban Setting 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Cort Dogniez (Metis,Canada)
Evelyn Johnston (Metis,Canada)
Gordon Martell (Waterhen Lake Cree First Nation,Canada)
Delvin Kanewiyakiho ()
Michael Thorson ()

A clear mandate has been expressed by the Metis community to ensure the inclusion of Metis content and perspectives in Saskatchewan schools. Central Urban Metis Federation Inc. and Greater Saskatoon Catholic Schools are in a formal partnership to collaboratively develop a model for the inclusion of Metis content and perspectives at St. Michael Community School and the rest of the school division. The focus has been to build strong curricular connections, and programming, identify valuable resources, support staff PD opportunities and strengthen relationships with the Metis community.
Partnership members will share the development of the model and its impact on students, staff and community.

Human Trafficking on Indian Country

Topic: Governance

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28316 Human Trafficking on Indian Country 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Nathaniel Brown (Diné Nation,United States) Presentation on Human Trafficking legislation on the Navajo Nation and partnering with Indian Country and State of Arizona. My appointment by Arizona Governor Doug Ducey to sit on the Arizona Human Trafficking Council. What are the impacts on Native Americans living away from the boarders, need to educate everyone within Indian Country.

Inquiry for Indigenous Science Students (I2S2)

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28351 Inquiry for Indigenous Science Students (I2S2) 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Elizabeth Kupsch (Aboriginal Australian,Australia)
Jesse King ()
Dr. Celia McNeilly ()
The I2S2 program aims to increase participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in STEM studies, at schools and universities, and careers. Experienced Indigenous educators in science education have developed culturally contextualised hands on science inquiries and a teacher professional development program that supports teachers to use them. The program is delivered to middle school students in a mainstream context providing the additional benefit of increasing awareness of the science knowledge of our first peoples. http://www.csiro.au/en/Education/Programs/Indigenous-STEM/I2S2

Te Taunga ika o Tamahana - Fishing with Mathematics

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28425 Te Taunga ika o Tamahana - Fishing with Mathematics 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Wednesday Allan Collins (Whakat'hea, Ngai Tuhoe, and Te Wh'nau-a-Apanui iwi from Aotearoa,New Zealand) Following on from the first presentation, Hunting and Fishing with Mathematics, at WIPCE 2014 in Hawaii. This workshop is a continuation from 2014 which looks at an indigenous principle-based practice from a traditional and contemporary view. The preservation and revitalization of indigenous elders stories is paramount and continues to guide us today. This space allows us to be creative and innovative in how we view the world, whether you enjoy fishing or mathematics.

Thursday

Understanding Maori Leadership

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28178 Understanding Maori Leadership 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Haydon Richards (Ngāi Tahu - Māori,New Zealand)
Talia Ellison (Ngāi Tahu - Māori,New Zealand)
Golda Varona (Ngāi Tahu - Māori,New Zealand)
A dichotomy of leadership: Understanding tribal succession from a generational perspective
28179 Understanding Maori Leadership 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Haydon Richards (Ngāi Tahu - Māori,New Zealand)
Talia Ellison (Ngāi Tahu - Māori,New Zealand)
Golda Varona (Ngāi Tahu - Māori,New Zealand)
Co-designing Leadership: An exploration of collectivising Māori experiences, knowledge and wisdom

Grafting Indigenous Ways of Knowing Onto Non-Indigenous Ways of Being

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27590 Grafting Indigenous Ways of Knowing Onto Non-Indigenous Ways of Being 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Cash Ahenakew (ahtahkakoop cree nation,Canada)
Chas Desjarlais (Cree/Metis)
We examine issues that arise when Indigenous epistemologies are interpreted through non-Indigenous ontologies in research settings. The concept of grafting refers to the act of transplanting ways of knowing and being from a context where they emerge naturally to a context where they are artificially implanted. We explore this context through a poem that outlines the difficulties Indigenous people face when inhabiting academic spaces whose architecture is built on the modernity's violence. Next we outline critiques of educational spheres, coloniality & move to a discussion of cosmology, ceremony & sacred pain. IRQR: http://irqr.ucpress.edu/content/9/3/323

When Will We Get It Right? - Fifty Years of Trying to Educate Our Children

Topic: Governance

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27683 When Will We Get It Right? - Fifty Years of Trying to Educate Our Children 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Richard Hill (Tuscarora nation,Hodinohsoni) This presentation will reflect upon our collective experiences in trying the take control over the education of Indigenous children, moving past racist practices to the restoration of Indigenous identities, customary practices and self-determination. How well have we done, given a high dropout rates and lower academic achievements? What have we learned from the new educational experiments we have subjected our children to? I will try to give a fair, but honest, assessment of what we have achieved and what still needs to be done, looking at educational history across the territory of the Haudenosaunee since 1967, when the National Indian Youth Council declared that... I will be joined by my wife, Chandra Maracle, who will explain the cultural and educational foundations for what we believe to be the answer to the 50-year dilemma. She will explain the principles behind the immersion school we helped to start at Six Nations called the Skaronhyase’ko:wa Tsyohterakentko:wa Tsi Yontaweya’tahkwa - Everlasting Tree School.

When Onkwehonwe research the Guests/Settlers

Topic: Indigenous Pedagogy

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27686 When Onkwehonwe research the Guests/Settlers 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Ruth Koleszar-Green (Six Nations of the Grand River) In this presentation I will be talking about the struggles, challenges and outcomes that occurred as I utilized Onkwehonwe (Original People in Mohawk) research methodologies with a group of Guest/Settler participants that had attended a post-secondary course on Onkwehonwe topics taught using Onkwehonwe pedagogies by an Onkwehonwe person. I will discuss how I see this project as "researching back" (Smith, 1999) to colonial powers. The research, my doctoral dissertation, is grounded on the teachings of Wampum belts and used story-telling circles to gather data. I will also discuss a novel dissemination strategy that kept the story-telling circle present even in the written document.

Anishinaabemowin Curriculum Department

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27702 Anishinaabemowin Curriculum Department 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Theresa Hoy (Odawa / Wikwemikong Unceded Indian Reserve,Odawa) WBE is about enabling educators and administrators to develop skills necessary to establish highly-effective learning environments where FN language, culture and heritage are embraced. Awareness of 2nd lang.acquisition processes is vital, it is even more important for educ's to connect with the cultural norms and values of students. We do this, in part, by developing high impact, community driven and guided NL materials for community, school & classroom use. Our goal,youth speaking NL daily, in competitions,conferences and taking it home to speak to family. Through continuous dev. creation and use of high impact curricula & resource material, it will help achieve fluency in speaking NL.

Building cultural competency, commitment and resilience across a system of schools

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27404 Building cultural competency, commitment and resilience across a system of schools 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Karan Taylor (Australia)
Beth Riolo (n/a,Australia)
Anne-Maree Creenaune (n/a,Australia)
The Catholic Diocese of Wollongong is located between Sydney and Canberra and home to significant populations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. In 2008 it was recognized that the number of Indigenous students enrolled in Catholic schools in this region was disproportionately low, and a strategic plan to engage more genuinely with communities, make Catholic schools more accessible and culturally inclusive, and to build the cultural competencies and commitment of staff was put into action. As a consequence Indigenous student enrolment has grown by almost 200% in eight years. This workshop will explore some of the strategies and programs that have contributed to this change.

The impact of Iwi connections to schools: Celebrating knowledge and resilience to influence change in the contextualisation in the school Curriculum, an Iwi (Tribal) perspective.

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27592 The impact of Iwi connections to schools: Celebrating knowledge and resilience to influence change in the contextualisation in the school Curriculum, an Iwi (Tribal) perspective. 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Christopher Whaanga (Ngaati Kahungunu - Tainui Waikato,Aotearoa New Zealand) Research which provides an Iwi (tribal)perspective on the importance of teaching and learning in areas of iwi knowledge in 21st century schools and universities. This workshop will look explicitly at the relationships between mana whenua (caretakers of the land)and schools and/or universities who facilitate teaching and learning within this area. It will also look at celebrating resilience as an iwi and what this means in the teaching and learning from a school or university curriculum.

The 3 R's that really matter in indigenous education - Risk, Resilience and Resource

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27597 The 3 R's that really matter in indigenous education - Risk, Resilience and Resource 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Dr.Cristina Afán Lai (Taiwan Ami FN,Canada)

The 3 R's of education MUST be different for our indigenous students. Given the profile of our youths,before they can succeed in the academic sphere,we first must make sure that they succeed in living. Our youths are, unfortunately,high Risk students.They continue to suffer repercussive circles of painful and humiliating colonization.They need to be equipped with Resiliency to overcome these challenges and be able to access the power of human adaptive systems to view unfavourable conditions as merely temporary.In this workshop,I will facilitate a mindfulness lesson and together we can see how it can be used for self-regulation to increase social-emotional intelligence in indigenous students.

Always Was: Aboriginal spatial experiences of land and Country

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27599 Always Was: Aboriginal spatial experiences of land and Country 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Daniele Hromek (Australia/Yuin/Budawang) Geographically, cartographically and topographically, First Peoples and Europeans understand the land differently; Europeans measure, manipulate, own the land. Aboriginal people, on the other hand, acknowledge land as Country where being and knowing the land is holistic. The ongoing and enduring relationships Aboriginal people have with the land in relation to their connection to Country repudiates the concept of "terra nullius" that Europeans brought to the land they called Australia. With notions of property and ownership at the forefront, Western literature has continually failed in its inability to represent Aboriginal experiences of Country, effectively silencing Aboriginal standpoints.

The Project Effectiveness of the Indigenous Language as Family Heirloom

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27653 The Project Effectiveness of the Indigenous Language as Family Heirloom 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Li Tsung-Wen Kuo (Paiwan tribe of Taiwan,Taiwan) The Indigenous Languages as Family Heirlooms project was supported by the Council of Indigenous Peoples in Taiwan. Training indigenous peoples’ most valuable human resources, grandparents and elders,to care for 0~4 year-old young children in a home setting provided the opportunity to teach the indigenous language to young children and sharing indigenous cultural traditions as family heirlooms. These education experiences are needed for young children to experience positive and healthy cultural development.

Sharing the Knowledge, Preserving the Culture - How Tribal Colleges and Universities are using Tribal communities to contribute to the restoration of Traditional Native Art Forms and Knowledge

Topic: Arts

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27587 Sharing the Knowledge, Preserving the Culture - How Tribal Colleges and Universities are using Tribal communities to contribute to the restoration of Traditional Native Art Forms and Knowledge 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Bridget Skenadore (United States) This session will describe the way in which Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs) are engaging their students and the communities they serve to help with the restoration and preservation of Traditional Native art forms and knowledge. Through academic courses and community extension workshops, TCUs are increasing the transfer of knowledge of art and culture at participating TCUs and communities they serve. In addition, TCUs are expanding the cultural knowledge of master artists by integrating them into programs that will transfer their artistic skills that are lost or endangered art forms to TCU students and community members.

Raising Māori Student Achievement – Through the Entrepreneurial Mindset

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27588 Raising Māori Student Achievement – Through the Entrepreneurial Mindset 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Cadence Kaumoana (Ngāti Maniapoto / Ngāti Apakura,New Zealand - Māori) Exposure to entrepreneurship education has multiple benefits for young people within educational institutions. This presentation will share ideas and on what contributes to an entrepreneurship mindset and its implication for curriculum design, particularly for students in Year 9 and 10 at secondary school. This workshop will equip the participants with entrepreneurial resources and tools to support the development of the entrepreneurial mindset and how to impart these teachings in our own professions in the development of leaders. The presenter will share with you stories of empowerment immersed in Māori histories, values, beliefs and aspirations with fundamental entrepreneurship themes that contribute to the realisation of individual and collective potential.

Taniwha Rising - HAKAMANA Indigenous Technological Sovereignty

Topic: Information & Communications Technology

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27577 Taniwha Rising - HAKAMANA Indigenous Technological Sovereignty 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Tania Wolfgramm (Maori / Kingdom of Tonga,New Zealand / Te Aupouri / Whakatohea / Kingdom of Tonga)
Wikuki Kingi (Maori / Hawaii,New Zealand / Tainui / Te Whanau a Apanui / Ngai Tai / Kati Mamoe)
The HAKAMANA System of Transformative Design, Development, and Evaluation is guided by an understanding that Māori / Pacific and Indigenous peoples have always had ways of designing, developing, and assessing merit of worth based on their traditional values and ways and means of expressing themselves culturally, linguistically, and symbolically. We aim to share and discuss the HAKAMANA System and how it can be applied and utilised across multiple contexts. In particular, we invite to this workshop visionary, genius and ingenious Indigenous people from all sectors and their supporters to HAKAMANA Indigenous Technological Sovereignty and build a Global Indigenous Technology Alliance?

Ngā Kura Huna a Tāne: Traditional Māori learning systems as validation for neuroscience

Topic: Indigenous Pedagogy

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27676 Ngā Kura Huna a Tāne: Traditional Māori learning systems as validation for neuroscience 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Phil Lambert (Māori,Ngāpuhi, Aotearoa)

In Aotearoa/New Zealand, traditional Māori cultural practices have been used in Māori language schools to link language to culture in a more authentic way. Embedded within these cultural practices are philosophies and activities that trigger psychological, physical and physiological responses that enhance learning. These responses provide practical precedents and real life evidence for new learning "discoveries" from the fields of brain theory and neuroscience. This presentation will identify learning strategies from traditional Māori cultural practices. It will then propose new learning models using those practices to validate learning theories from neuroscience.

Hui Manaʻoiʻo: Using Culture-Based Education to Improve Self-Efficacy in Indigenous Students

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27411 Hui Manaʻoiʻo: Using Culture-Based Education to Improve Self-Efficacy in Indigenous Students 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Che Sabol (Hawaiian,Hawaiian)
Gina Māhealani Karas (Hawai'i)

Kamehameha Scholars supports Native Hawaiian students in achieving a post-secondary degree, entering a career of their choosing, and cultivating their ability to be servant leaders. This session looks at an intervention strategy implemented within our program for students identified as academic underachievers. Partnering with community members, we used a small group counseling format, interwoven with cultural values and practices, to support our students in developing their self-efficacy as academically thriving Native Hawaiians. We will also share examples of various lessons, provide data demonstrating the benefits of this strategy, and review the challenges and successes we experienced.

AFOA Canada - An Aboriginal Training Institution

Topic:

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27701 AFOA Canada - An Aboriginal Training Institution 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Terry Goodtrack (Lakota First Nation) AFOA Canada is a national Aboriginal Training Institution who has successfully trained thousands of students and professionals in the areas of Aboriginal finance, management and leadership within Canada. The certifications in these three areas were developed by Aboriginal people for Aboriginal people. Upon completion of the AFOA Canada certifications, students and professionals are able to apply their credits toward broader certifications in the Canadian marketplace. AFOA Canada delivers numerous professional development workshops that are relevant to its over 1500 members. Learn about the impact this Aboriginal Institution has made over the past 18 years.

Challenges of language revitalization in an institutional context

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27649 Challenges of language revitalization in an institutional context 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Lars-Joar Halonen (Sámi,Norway/Sámi/Norwegian) What institutional challenges do an indigenous community meet concerning language revitalization in a mostly norwegianized municipality. The presenter will specifically focus on measures taken place in his municipality in Norway. The institutions are; the health care centre for elders, language courses for adults, special measures in school and the Sámi kindergarten itself. This specific presentation will not focus on the concrete actions taken place at these institutions, but it will focus on the institutional and administrative challenges that these different language measures met within these institutions in trying to revitalize and lift the status of the indigenous language.

Voyaging Into The Future

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27368 Voyaging Into The Future 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Sabra Kauka (Hawaiian,Hawai`i)
Steven Soltysik (Hawaiian,United States)
Malie Jumawan (Hawaiian,Hawai`i)
Juanita Lokalia Kaopuiki (Hawaiian,Hawai`i)
Allen Kaopuiki (Hawaiian-Hawai'i)
Voyaging into the future from a traditional cultural base is the topic of this hands-on interactive workshop. We have developed teaching tools to share with you. And we will ask you to share how your people navigate in the ancient ways. An update on the Hokule`a, Hawai`iʻs voyaging canoe; and a new department wide initiative called Na Hopena A`o (HA) will also be covered.

Indigenous Research Ethnics: Practice and Reflection

Topic: Indigenous Research Methodology & Praxis

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27506 Indigenous Research Ethnics: Practice and Reflection 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Jolan Hsieh (Siraya Nation of Taiwan,Taiwan)
Ifuk Sliyud (Pangcah tribe of Taiwan,Taiwan)
This presentation begins from sharing perspective and experiences in the notion of indigenous research ethics in the field. It then turns to discusses issues of the research process raised and questions that followed. Thirdly, it will present a brief discussion on Kaupapa Māori, a research approach that upholds Māori values and epistemology, as possible contribution towards a indigenous-focused research ethics.

Traditional Teachings

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27625 Traditional Teachings 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Isaac Day (Canada/Serpent River First Nation/Ojibway) We call this place we live in, our Mother Earth.What would a good Mother do for her child?A good mother would care about your feelings; what you hear around you would be important to her; she would be concerned about what you see.As a result, the child grows up healthy, with an open mind about life and able to voice what s/he feels is important.This child is then able to reconcile the mind, body and spirit.Today, people can have difficulty reconciling due to trauma they've suffered in their lives.Isaac will share his Teachings which are universal and can be utilized by all colours of man. The Teachings can help a person reconcile back to the earth.

Ignite Session 16: Culturally Responsive Education - Thursday, July 27th - 10:00-10:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27803 Ignite Session 16: Culturally Responsive Education 10:00 AM 10:15 AM Thursday Cultural Responsive Education Program Standards
27805 Ignite Session 16: Culturally Responsive Education 10:30 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Promoting Successful Indigenous Education in Manitoba

Ignite Session 66: Innovations in Indigenous Education - Thursday, July 27th - 10:00-10:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27953 Ignite Session 66: Innovations in Indigenous Education 10:00 AM 10:15 AM Thursday Whai Ao ki Te Ao Marama- An Indigenous Group Formation Model
27954 Ignite Session 66: Innovations in Indigenous Education 10:15 AM 10:30 AM Thursday Steps on the Journey : A Maori Student Advancement Plan using The Pathways to Excellence Model
27955 Ignite Session 66: Innovations in Indigenous Education 10:30 AM 10:45 AM Thursday iridescence Wellbeing Model - A Remedy to Western Education

Ignite Session 98: Indigenous Languages - Thursday, July 27th - 10:00-10:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
28049 Ignite Session 98: Indigenous Languages 10:00 AM 10:15 AM Thursday Language Revitalization through Animation: Creating Fun and Multipurpose Educational Materials from Native Speakers and Recordings
28050 Ignite Session 98: Indigenous Languages 10:15 AM 10:30 AM Thursday Navigating our Journeys in Hawaiian Language Medium-Immersion Teacher Education
28051 Ignite Session 98: Indigenous Languages 10:30 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Bridging the gap in Indigenous Australian languages teacher education

Ignite Session 20: Culturally Responsive Education - Thursday, July 27th - 10:00-10:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27815 Ignite Session 20: Culturally Responsive Education 10:00 AM 10:15 AM Thursday Dancing with our Mocs in Two Worlds : Building Nations through Culturally Responsive Education Programs in Urban Education Systems.
27816 Ignite Session 20: Culturally Responsive Education 10:15 AM 10:30 AM Thursday Self Determination through Aboriginal student voices: Allowing cultural narratives in research develop changes to educational practice.
27817 Ignite Session 20: Culturally Responsive Education 10:30 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Wingara- Making our path sharing our journey.

Ignite Session 51: Innovations in Indigenous Education - Thursday, July 27th - 10:00-10:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27908 Ignite Session 51: Innovations in Indigenous Education 10:00 AM 10:15 AM Thursday Engaging Indigenous youth and communities in sports programs
27909 Ignite Session 51: Innovations in Indigenous Education 10:15 AM 10:30 AM Thursday Yarning with the Stars: Indigenous Girls Owning their Education
27910 Ignite Session 51: Innovations in Indigenous Education 10:30 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Yarning Circle: Exploring the journey of privileging Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures in the University of the Sunshine Coast Teacher Education Programs

Ignite Session 82: Culturally Responsive Education - Thursday, July 27th - 10:00-10:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
28001 Ignite Session 82: Culturally Responsive Education 10:00 AM 10:15 AM Thursday Charting the Journey of a Native Hawaiian-Serving Post-secondary Institution
28002 Ignite Session 82: Culturally Responsive Education 10:15 AM 10:30 AM Thursday Linking Native Hawaiian Academic Advancement Through the Science of Ancestral Knowledge
28003 Ignite Session 82: Culturally Responsive Education 10:30 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Seeking Innovative Māori learner success in tertiary studies

Ignite Session 8: Arts - Thursday, July 27th - 10:00-10:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27779 Ignite Session 8: Arts 10:00 AM 10:15 AM Thursday connection through words
27780 Ignite Session 8: Arts 10:15 AM 10:30 AM Thursday Te Wharenui o Horouta (The meeting house of Horouta)
27781 Ignite Session 8: Arts 10:30 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Memories Brought Into The Light: The Elders Project Series

FEATURE PRESENTATION: "Kiingitanga: Our People"

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27713 FEATURE PRESENTATION: "Kiingitanga: Our People" 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Mamae Takerei (WAIKATO - TAINUI,Aotearoa New Zealand WAIKATO IWI - MAORI)
Te Kahautu Maxwell ()

The diversity of Maori reflected in this presentation gives rise from poverty, politics to prosperity. With 67,000 registered tribal members Waikato Iwi has withstood the impact of colonial process from the 'grave' to become a vital contributor to meeting the need of the greater communities through education and its investment in commercial enterprise. 

An Examination into Indian Residential Schools: Perspectives of Blackfoot Confederacy People

Topic: Teaching Indigenous Histories

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28432 An Examination into Indian Residential Schools: Perspectives of Blackfoot Confederacy People 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Terri-Lynn Fox (Blackfoot Confederacy) The workshop will highlight the history of Aboriginal policy within a Canadian context leading up to the Indian Residential Schools, and its closure. It will also provide an Indigenous methodological approach which honors and frames these stories within a traditional-cultural context and worldview. A reflective Indigenous insight from both a western researcher and Blackfoot/Indigenous worldview will also be shared.

HAVING THE HARD CONVERSATIONS: Good practice in addressing individual and institutional resistance to Indigenous health and cultural safety education

Topic: Health & Wellness

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28435 HAVING THE HARD CONVERSATIONS: Good practice in addressing individual and institutional resistance to Indigenous health and cultural safety education 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Dennis McDermott (Dennis McDermott (Koori (Aboriginal Australian),Australia)
Angela Lawless (Koori (Aboriginal Australian) ,Australia)
David Sjoberg (Koori (Aboriginal Australian) ,Australia)
This workshop responds to individual and institutional resistance to Indigenous health/cultural safety education. It goes beyond individual strategies to address organisational reluctance to take on racism and the resistance of health professionals to "settler privilege". The workshop draws on a programme of work arising from an Australian Government-funded National Senior Teaching Fellowship: Having the Hard Conversations. It introduces a Good Practice Guide and video resources (featuring Canadian/Australian/New Zealand expert informants) designed to address culturally-unsafe educational settings and institutional barriers alike, particularly utilising accreditation body leverage.

Maintaining the Integrity of Tikanga Maori in the Digital Space

Topic: Information & Communications Technology

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28449 Maintaining the Integrity of Tikanga Maori in the Digital Space 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Thursday Tema Fenton-Coyne (Ngāti Hau/ Ngāti Pakau/ Ngāti Apakura (Māori),Aotearoa, New Zealand) Digit explores digital literacy with whānau from Pehiaweri Marae in Aotearoa, New Zealand. Researchers developed Marae-based learning programs specific to the needs of young and old. Evidence shows that youth have a high digital literacy, but lack the required digital tikanga (Māori protocol online). Elders have the wisdom of tikanga, but have low digital literacy. This digital learning project has facilitated knowledge exchange, where elders hand down tikanga to the youth, and youth share their digital knowledge with their elders. This presentation will share research stories which offer new ways to understand the digital world whilst maintaining the integrity of tikanga Māori practices.

The Stolen Generation

Topic: Teaching Indigenous Histories

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28176 The Stolen Generation 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Caron Wynne (Australia)
Veronica Goerke (Australia)
Stealing back the Stolen: A heroic story of resilience about Aboriginal children determined to return to kin and country

Is Transparency in Cultural Education Governance the Key to Empowerment?

Topic: Governance

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27582 Is Transparency in Cultural Education Governance the Key to Empowerment? 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Allan Teale (Australia: Wiradjuri Nation: Australia) This paper outlines the importance that cultural education governance has in delivering greater transparency and autonomy for first nation communities. Greater transparency, governance, and autonomy is the missing key to linking with the wider community. Engagement in cultural education can only achieve the recognition by governing states to the importance that cultural education has in developing community recognition. The rule of law, transparency, and education have been guidelines and the way of life for first nation communities for generations.

Ki-o-Rahi: An old friend in a new time

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27589 Ki-o-Rahi: An old friend in a new time 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Carl Shepherd (Aotearoa New Zealanf of Ngapuhi (tribe) - Ngati Whatua (hapu)) A recent resurgence of traditional Maori games in Aotearoa has seen activities and games that our tupuna (ancestors) used many years ago, are slowly become more prevalent and even more important to help educate our rangatahi Maori (youth of Maori descent). At the forefront of the resurgence of traditional Maori games, is Ki-o-Rahi. This research examines the impact Ki-o-Rahi has had on the rangatahi Maori enrolled in the vocational pathway to fitness (level 2) program within the tertiary education provider, Te Wananga o Aotearoa. This research also provides insight into how the game of Ki-o-Rahi was implemented into the marau (curriculum) to maximise tauira (student) success.

Using nature as a metaphor to being resilient

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27685 Using nature as a metaphor to being resilient 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Ruhia King (Maori,New Zealand) Ngaa (the many) taiao (natures) o te manawaroa (of resilence) Participants of this workshop will appreciate how using nature as a metaphor positively impacts the sustainability of Indigenous Education. Using the elements of whenua (earth), haa (air), wai (water) and ahi (fire) as a metaphor improves understanding of human nature, respect diversity and demonstrates how working inter-dependently and synergistically with nature contributes to healthier communication and resilience when managing issues of conflict that enhances our roles as Indigenous practitioners that contributes to the positive impacts of Indigenous Education.

Equine Psychotherapy and Aboriginal Youth; creating alternative pathways

Topic:

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27637 Equine Psychotherapy and Aboriginal Youth; creating alternative pathways 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Juli Coffin (Australian Aboriginal) Utilising animals in educational settings is not new, nor is the relationship with many Indigenous groups around the world and horses. What has not been done before is a full exploration of how Aboriginal students deemed 'at risk' and in other sectors respond with an equine psychotherapy approach by an Aboriginal practitioner. Magic happens and it is a phenomenological offering of a relationship and shift in time and space that perhaps can account for a change in the causal pathway that so many of our young people are on. This presentation describes what happened over a one year period for over 130 Aboriginal young people who accessed this program and how it can make a difference.

Yukwatsistay^ Our fire, our spirit within each of us.

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27639 Yukwatsistay^ Our fire, our spirit within each of us. 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Kah^tanukwas Cornelius (USA/Oneida WI) This project addresses 3 language learners to determine whether reconciliation of one’s personal history & cultural identity empowers an individual to learn their Indigenous language at a faster rate.The reconciliation of a person’s personal history for this project includes ending emotional, spiritual or physical conflicts that have held language learners back because of personal conflicts. By not taking care of these personal issues language learners were hindered in successful language acquisition.

Using storytelling to inspire people of all ages about Aboriginal (Wiradjuri) culture

Topic: Lifelong Learning

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27648 Using storytelling to inspire people of all ages about Aboriginal (Wiradjuri) culture 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Larry Brandy (Australia/Wiradjuri/Australian) Introducing Aboriginal culture in a fun interactive way helps children become interested in Aboriginal culture from an early age. Join Wiradjuri man, Larry Brandy, as he shows how he presents Aboriginal culture to young children. This is a very interactive session and delegates will be invited to participate in his presentation and become hunters, kangaroos or emus. Larry uses real tools and weapons and shows how they were used in traditional times. He does this in a way that appeals to young children (boories) and in a way that they remember.

Nehiyaw Pimatisiwin - Indigenous Life and Values

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27373 Nehiyaw Pimatisiwin - Indigenous Life and Values 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Claudine Louis (Maskwacis Cree)
Shauna Bruno (Maskwacis Cree,Canada, Samson Cree First Nation)
Patricia Goodwill-Littlechild (Maskwacis Cree,Canada, Ermineskin Cree First Nation)
Patti Currie (Maskwacis Cree,Canada, Montana Cree First Nation)
Grace Dion (Maskwacis Cree,Canada, Samson Cree First Nation)
Information will be shared by each panel member to discuss the research project that was undertaken by Maskwacis Cultural College about literacy education in the community of Maskwacis, which is located in Central Alberta, Canada. The purpose of the session is to share major findings and insights into the research process and to re-define literacy and its components as determined by Maskwacis Cree epistemologies. The report is a submission prepared for Alberta Innovation & Advanced Education which was completed by Indigenous community researchers that summarizes the conversations about the extensive topic of literacy education and its' potential meanings for future policy directions.

wakká:raien - i have a story: urban mixed-blood indigenous women, identity, and place

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27664 wakká:raien - i have a story: urban mixed-blood indigenous women, identity, and place 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday nahannee schuitemaker (Kanien'kehaka,Kanien'kehá:ka) An assumption exists that all indigenous people are connected to or have access to the lands of their ancestors & to the teachings, culture, memories, & stories that land consists of. Due to the impact of colonization, younger generations may feel intergenerational impacts of identity shame that their relations suffered but as the political climate changes in urban centres, a resurgence of pride may be fostered. I explore stories of resurgence, resiliency & reclamation of identity in mixed-blood indigenous women on unceded Coast Salish territory & how these women, who do not have direct connection to their own ancestral lands, form connections with the land they are visitors on.

Indigenous Astronomy from the Inside

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27544 Indigenous Astronomy from the Inside 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Jim Rock (Dakota,USA)
Nancy Maryboy (Dine/Cherokee,USA)
In the past, most Indigenous astronomy was written about by non-native archeologists and archeo-astronomers, through the lens of western and often religious perspectives. Today more Indigenous peoples are researching their own astronomies. This is to pass these ways of knowing down to future generations, but also to people from other tribes. In this presentation we will present planetarium shows developed by Dine (Navajo) and Dakota astronomers who have been studying their own astronomies and related sacred sites.

Engaging Community - Success in Higher Educational Employment

Topic: Nationhood & Sustainability

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27538 Engaging Community - Success in Higher Educational Employment 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Jeremy Heathcote (Aboriginal (Awabakal),Awabakal) The University of Sydney is focusing on redeveloping it’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander employment and retention program through a culturally inclusive model with an emphasis on kinship, inter-relationships, capability building and support. The engagement with the local community is key to seeing the numbers continue to increase and the staff retained in their roles. The Manager Indigenous Employment and Key Community Leader from one of the Aboriginal organisations in the area will discuss the importance of having a strategy that not only links to opportunity, but provides for professional development and mentoring.

The role of video in preserving the resilience, retention and preservation of Matariki (Pleiades)

Topic: Arts

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27652 The role of video in preserving the resilience, retention and preservation of Matariki (Pleiades) 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Lea Mclean (New Zealand Māori, Ngāti Porou, Te Ati-Haunui-a-Paparangi,New Zealand) Research by Dr Rangi Matamua identified the long held Māori worldview of Matariki had been colonised. With this newfound knowledge, a national roadshow was strategised to reeducate the collective. The primary aim was to realign the knowledge of the existing seven stars and introduce a further two stars long forgotten in our history. Video played a key role as a modern storytelling tool, aiding our ancestors stories to become more resilient, improving retention and preservation of our cultures future. This presentation highlights the role of video in the pursuit of Tino Rangatiratanga, whilst recognising the challenges of using video and how social media can skew traditional knowledge.

A Draft of Professional Standards for Indigenous (Aboriginal, Native American, Hawaiian and Pacific Islander) Programs and Services

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27375 A Draft of Professional Standards for Indigenous (Aboriginal, Native American, Hawaiian and Pacific Islander) Programs and Services 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Ruth Young (Wemindji Cree First Nation)
Asmanahi Antoine (Toquaht)
Ian Cull (Anishinaabe)
Robina Thomas (Lyackson)
Ruth Young (Cree)
The CAS Professional Standards for Higher Education provides general standards for 45 practice and functional areas in higher education programs and services. The standard for Indigenous Programs and Services has yet to be developed. This session will present the initial draft of such a standard currently being developed by a working group, and solicit feedback from session attendees. The intention is to further support the professionalization and growth of Indigenous programs and services across North America and to bring awareness of Indigenous ways of knowing and being within institutional structures.

Holistic Wellbeing making magic, causing ripples for our people by our people

Topic: Lifelong Learning

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27706 Holistic Wellbeing making magic, causing ripples for our people by our people 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Tuihana Ohia (Aotearoa, New Zealand) Celebrating the magic, and sharing stories of resilience about the people who dared to dream and participate in their holistic wellbeing, bringing something fresh and innovative to their wh?nau and communities. The ripple effect on wh?nau (family) and communities has been transformational as they change their perspective about holistic wellbeing. This magic, this ripple gives people a whole heap of sparkle to create and generate their wellbeing dreams and bring them to life. Holistic wellbeing aligns our aspiration which is to see our people, our wh?nau, and our communities be resilient in their mind, spirit, and body; in doing so they flourish.

At the intersection of Māori and Equity groups: the emerging diversity of Māori and Equity

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27634 At the intersection of Māori and Equity groups: the emerging diversity of Māori and Equity 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Jonaan McLeod (Ngapuhi, Te Whakatohea, Te Whanau a Apanui,Aotearoa - New Zealand) I wish to analyse the emerging number of Māori students that also identify with other Equity groups at the University of Auckland. Equity groups include: Pacific, Disabilities, Low Socio-Economic and LGBTI. This intersect provides opportunities and challenges including [but not limited to] enhancing admission, retention, achievement and experiences of our students. Māori with diverse identities have a unique opportunity to access cross section support and are not restricted to one avenue- a Maori student from a low socio economic background, who has a visible impairment has the right to access all levels of support to nurture his admission, retention and achievement.

Integrating Matauranga Maori into business as usual – a Crown Agency approach

Topic: Public Education for Reconciliation

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27662 Integrating Matauranga Maori into business as usual – a Crown Agency approach 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Angela Karini (New Zealand)
Teurikore Biddle Ranga ()

Te Hono o Te Kahurangi is the name of the whare that uses a unique whare ako framework to bring together Mātauranga Māori and Evaluative Quality Assurance (MM EQA) into one seamless approach within a crown entity. It assesses how well, and to what extent, education providers are contributing to education outcomes of ākonga, whānau, hapū, iwi, and where relevant, hapori Māori. This workshop discusses the extended scope of the updated approach, and how New Zealand Qualification Authority (NZQA), has since positioned in-house cultural capacity and capability to quality assure qualifications, programmes and providers privileging Mātauranga Māori in education outcomes.

Building Connections – Revitalizing Community Wellbeing

Topic: Partnerships in Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27413 Building Connections – Revitalizing Community Wellbeing 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Ileana Haunani Ruelas (United States)
Sanoe Marfil (Kanaka 'Oiwi, Hawaiian,United States)
Christy Sato (Kanaka 'Oiwi, Hawaiian,United States)
Reconnecting to narratives that shape our identities and provide the foundations for our knowledge and cultural practices is a way to awaken potentiality in revitalizing community-well-being. The Community Learning Exchange is an inter-generational educational model that brings families together to learn from elders, practitioners, and one another. We will share practical strategies for growing intimacy in relationships between place, practice, people, and collaborating organizations. Participants will be introduced to the model, stories and evaluation measures of strengthened community resiliency, and explore ways that it can inform work in other indigenous contexts.

Sexual Exploitation Prevention Education for Indigenous Girls

Topic: Child Welfare

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27610 Sexual Exploitation Prevention Education for Indigenous Girls 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Dustin Louie (Nee Tahi Buhn First Nation) Indigenous girls in Canada are drastically overrepresented in sexual exploitation, while the phenomenon is simultaneously overlooked in academia and school systems. This workshop investigates the potential of formal education systems to develop preventative education for Indigenous girls vulnerable to sexual exploitation. The knowledge of this workshop is based on the perspective of five Indigenous sexual exploitation survivors and 19 service providers in Saskatchewan, and a secondary study with new participants underway in Calgary. Recommendations are based upon three primary questions; what is causing vulnerability; how is recruitment/entry happening; what should prevention look like?

Consultation duty in Sami matters "The Agreement on procedures for consultations between the Central Government authorities and the Samediggi"

Topic: Governance

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27640 Consultation duty in Sami matters "The Agreement on procedures for consultations between the Central Government authorities and the Samediggi" 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Anne Britt K. Hætta (Sami,Norway) According to ILO-169 the Sámi are entitled to be consulted on matters affecting them. “The Agreement on procedures for consultations between the Central Government authorities and the Sámediggi” sets out procedures for consultations with the Sámediggi (elected national assembly for the Sámi in Norway). The Agreement gives The Sámediggi the possibility to influence, but it does not grant them veto in matters affecting Sámi interests. Formal decisions are still made by state authorities. If The Sámediggi disagrees with state authorities this will be stated when the matters are treated in government and national parliament. We will present how sámi education has been treated in consultations.

Indigenous academics in Australian universities: A brighter future?

Topic: Indigenous Pedagogy

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27489 Indigenous academics in Australian universities: A brighter future? 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Susan Page (Australia)
Christine Asmar (Australia)
In Australia, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander academics have historically worked in Indigenous centres where most of their colleagues and students are also Indigenous. More recently, Indigenous Australian academics have been taking up positions in ‘mainstream’ schools and departments where they mostly work with non-Indigenous colleagues, and teach non-Indigenous students. We interviewed Indigenous academics on several campuses, in Indigenous centres as well as mainstream disciplines or departments. Some of our findings surprised us, appearing to contradict dominant narratives in the literature. In this interactive workshop we will discuss these findings, and their implications today.

Walking Two Worlds

Topic: Governance

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27647 Walking Two Worlds 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Kwatsitsa:wi M. Meloche (Kanienkeha:ka Mohawk of Kahnawa:ke,Canada) Reconciling begins with Me: "Reclaiming Our Indigenous Selves" This workshop will look at how many governmental policies were unbeknownst to the 1st Peoples of the land have, unknowingly, been influenced by not pursuing higher education because of those policies. Many youth I encounter, struggle with deciding to go on to a post-secondary institution for educational purposes in fear that they will fail and disappoint their communities. Because of past governmental policies many participants are unaware how important it is to look into these past policies which were developed to put a 'ceiling' on our higher educational level.

Transforming Maori youth through indigenous methodologies

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27667 Transforming Maori youth through indigenous methodologies 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Neven Harland (Ngāti Maniapoto,New Zealand) Experiences within a Aotearoa (New Zealand) community have shown that taiohi Māori (Māori youth) have trouble finding meaning of oneself in mainstream education. This type of education is characterised by a decontextualized one-size fits-all curriculum that does not relate to the indigenous culture and home lives of taiohi Mōari, and as result, they disengage from education.This presentation explains how the inclusiveness of cultural identity through a pedagogical method known as place-based education has re-engaged taiohi Māori back into education. The success of this learning methodology has provided taiohi Māori with opportunities to move into higher study or employment.

Edith Cowan University 'Old Ways New Ways' Outreach Programme

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27409 Edith Cowan University 'Old Ways New Ways' Outreach Programme 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Jason Barrow (Nyoongar Aboriginal,Australian Aboriginal)
Magdalena Wajrak (Australian)
Caroline Bishop (Australian)
The Old Ways New Ways program engages in a two-way interaction which seeks to ignite the desire and interest of students to study science subjects at a tertiary level. It uses traditional knowledge and survival activities and applies a contemporary scientific lens as well as new lab based activities to show how our Aboriginal people have been scientists for thousands of years. Now in our 3rd year, we have reached over 1000 students from 30 different schools around Western Australia (WA). Supported by the Higher Education Participation Program grant we have been finalists in the WA Premier's Science Awards for 2016 and winners of the national ATEM 2015 Tribal Award.

Ignite Session 44: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing - Thursday, July 27th - 11:00-11:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27887 Ignite Session 44: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing 11:00 AM 11:15 AM Thursday Indigenous ways of knowing: an Australian perspective
27888 Ignite Session 44: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing 11:15 AM 11:30 AM Thursday Stories of Native Educators Navigating Their Doctoral Journeys
27889 Ignite Session 44: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing 11:30 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Nyikina Women Strong: 4 generations journey across two centuries in story and reflection

Ignite Session 109: Indigenous Pedagogy - Thursday, July 27th - 11:00-11:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
28082 Ignite Session 109: Indigenous Pedagogy 11:00 AM 11:15 AM Thursday The challenge of higher education interculturalizing
28083 Ignite Session 109: Indigenous Pedagogy 11:15 AM 11:30 AM Thursday Bridging Cultural Two-Eyed Seeing into the 21st Technological Learning.
28084 Ignite Session 109: Indigenous Pedagogy 11:30 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Added Value of providing authentic cultural experiences to non-Maori professional educationalists

Ignite Session 11: Partnerships in Education - Thursday, July 27th - 11:00-11:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27788 Ignite Session 11: Partnerships in Education 11:00 AM 11:15 AM Thursday Identifying and Implementing a Philosophy of Community to Promote Effective Family, Community and School Relationships
27789 Ignite Session 11: Partnerships in Education 11:15 AM 11:30 AM Thursday The Community at the Centre: Developing a Local Indigenous Curriculum Resource
27790 Ignite Session 11: Partnerships in Education 11:30 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Understanding the further education aspirations of remote Aboriginal communities in Australia: Lessons learned during the Whole of Community Engagement initiative

Ignite Session 27: Innovations in Indigenous Education - Thursday, July 27th - 11:00-11:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27836 Ignite Session 27: Innovations in Indigenous Education 11:00 AM 11:15 AM Thursday "Know me you before you teach me": "Ruia taku taitea, kia rongo taikaka"
27837 Ignite Session 27: Innovations in Indigenous Education 11:15 AM 11:30 AM Thursday Education and Guardianship in the 21st Century, kootuia Te Aka Matauranga, Kaitiakitanga Hei Tikitiki Moo Toou Mahunga
27838 Ignite Session 27: Innovations in Indigenous Education 11:30 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Te Kaihautu o te waka

Ignite Session 69: Culturally Responsive Education - Thursday, July 27th - 11:00-11:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27962 Ignite Session 69: Culturally Responsive Education 11:00 AM 11:15 AM Thursday “Ktuhkelokepon” Awakening our Indigeneity: A Wabanaki Story of Truth, Justice and Reconciliation
27963 Ignite Session 69: Culturally Responsive Education 11:15 AM 11:30 AM Thursday Educational and Empowerment toward Reconciliation
27964 Ignite Session 69: Culturally Responsive Education 11:30 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Truth, Reconciliation and Building Relational Accountability between Indigenous Communities and Educational Engagements

Ignite Session 104: Culturally Responsive Education - Thursday, July 27th - 11:00-11:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
28067 Ignite Session 104: Culturally Responsive Education 11:00 AM 11:15 AM Thursday The’ye’lh Smuneem: Indigenous Youth Wellness
28069 Ignite Session 104: Culturally Responsive Education 11:30 AM 11:45 AM Thursday In.Business: A National Mentorship Program for Indigenous Youth

Ignite Session 36: Partnerships in Education - Thursday, July 27th - 11:00-11:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27863 Ignite Session 36: Partnerships in Education 11:00 AM 11:15 AM Thursday Empowering Struggling Readers: A Partnership that Supports Students and Teachers
27864 Ignite Session 36: Partnerships in Education 11:15 AM 11:30 AM Thursday The Gaa-maamawi-asigagindaasoyang Collective: Gathering to learn and do mathematics together!
27865 Ignite Session 36: Partnerships in Education 11:30 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Moving from the box into the circle - KeeTasKeeNow Landbased Learning Camps

FEATURE PRESENTATION: The History of WIPCE

Topic: Teaching Indigenous Histories

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28480 FEATURE PRESENTATION: The History of WIPCE 11:00 AM 11:45 AM Thursday Dr. Verna Kirkness () An in-depth history of the World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Education will be shared by the founder, Dr. Verna Kirkness.

Promoting Student Success in Higher Education

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28146 Promoting Student Success in Higher Education 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Mereana Toki (Māori,Aotearoa (NZ)) KEI Ā TĀTOU TE IHI – WE HAVE THE POWER: A collaborative and indigenous initiative promoting a further tertiary education
28147 Promoting Student Success in Higher Education 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Mereana Toki (Māori,Aotearoa (NZ)) Kaiwhakaurunga Māori - Māori Schools Advisor: Indigenous Recruitment Positions Within The Tertiary Sector

Intersectional of Indigenous Language Sovereignty from the Cherokee Nation, Diné Nation, Kahnawà:ke: Mohawk Territory, and M?ori New Zealand

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27400 Intersectional of Indigenous Language Sovereignty from the Cherokee Nation, Diné Nation, Kahnawà:ke: Mohawk Territory, and M?ori New Zealand 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Geneva Becenti, Ph.D. ()
Sophie Nock, Ph.D. Sophie (University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand,Māori of Ngāti Kurī descent)
Kahtehrón:ni Iris Stacey, M.Ed. Kahtehrón:ni Iris (Kahnawà:ke Education Center,Kanien’kehá:ka, Mohawk Nation)
Ryan (Wahde) Mackey Ryan (Wahde) (Cherokee Nation,Cherokee Nation)
This panel presentation is a group of relatives who cross paths, finding themselves discussing some common grounds on Indigenous Language Sovereignty (ILS) from the Cherokee Nation, Diné Nation, Kahnawà:ke: Mohawk Territory, and Māori New Zealand. Each author will address some critical policies, and the importance of local knowledge, sense of place and relationship to their work specifically on their heritage language. The panelist will present their collective work on a visual pedagogical framework that contest to the ILS. They will share their analysis of how ILS is defined and practiced includes what the future of ILS in their homelands. The ILS scholars will share their worldviews.

The Evolution and Revitalisation of Indigenous Education within Aotearoa

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27421 The Evolution and Revitalisation of Indigenous Education within Aotearoa 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Rereokeroa Shaw (New Zealand/Tainui/Maori)
Nikki Tarapa (Maori,New Zealand/Ngapuhi/Maori)
Ella Newbold (Maori,New Zealand/Tainui/Maori)
The near extinction of our culture and language inspires us to encourage future generations and other indigenous peoples to understand the history and educational journey from our ancestors to the present day. The loss of our indigenous language and knowledge through the impact of colonisation, enables us to strategise the renaissance of our language and education. This presentation will perpetuate Maori culture through the transmission of Māori principles and stories that have been traditionally handed down through the generations. We will refer to the stories of our ancestors to guide, commit and challenge us.

Onikaniwak - for those who lead - a Master's level camp course that promotes Indigenous culture, history, worldview to participants

Topic: Indigenous Pedagogy

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27372 Onikaniwak - for those who lead - a Master's level camp course that promotes Indigenous culture, history, worldview to participants 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Sherry Peden (Canada, Tootinawazaibeeing Treaty Nation in Manitoba, Canada)
Doris Young (Cree, Status Indian,Opaskwayak Cree Nation, Manitoba, Canada)
Dawn Wallin (n/a as Dawn is an institutional ally for this work in Indigenous knowledge mobilization,Saskatchewan, Canada)
Leo Nijssen ()
Donna Carriere ()
Onikaniwak – for those who lead is a Master’s level course at the University of Manitoba, Brandon University and the University of Saskatchewan that is delivered in a land-based, camp setting on the traditional territory of the Opaskwayak Cree Nation at Egg Lake, Manitoba. This camp course has been offered in 2014, 2015 and 2016 by utilizing Elders, cultural advisors and twelve community and institutional partnerships. . The focus of Onikaniwak is to develop increased capacity in aboriginal knowledge, history, worldviews, challenges, cultural activities and pedagogies for those who lead - educational leaders such as principals, resource teachers, deans, directors, instructors.

Mobilizing Training, Mobilizing Change

Topic:

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27527 Mobilizing Training, Mobilizing Change 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Renee Linklater (Anishinaabe – Member of Rainy River First Nations,Canada)
Laura Thibeault (Anishinaabe - Member of Dokis First Nation,Canada)
The Mobile Training Teams Initiative is led by the Aboriginal Engagement and Outreach Team of the Provincial System Support Program at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto, Canada. This workshop will share key highlights and lessons learned about the mobile training and professional development being delivered to Aboriginal mental health and addictions workers in Northern Ontario. The Initiative supports workers to implement culturally adapted and informed interventions and counselling techniques. Specific implementation supports are provided to workers engaged in the training initiative. Over 1200 workers have participated in training since the project began in 2015.

Ontario's Indigenous Postsecondary Education Strategy

Topic: Public Education for Reconciliation

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27528 Ontario's Indigenous Postsecondary Education Strategy 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Laurie Robinson (Algonquin and a member of the Wolf Lake First Nation,Canada)
Rosie Mosquito (Bearskin Lake First Nation,Canada)
Ontario's Indigenous Education Strategy (OIES) is the Province's commitment to strengthening relationships with Indigenous communities and addressing the diverse needs of Indigenous learners. In 2011, Ontario launched the Aboriginal Postsecondary Education and Training Policy Framework. Developed with Indigenous communities, Aboriginal Institutes, colleges and universities, it guides the development of policies and programs to operationalize the goals of the OIES. Ontario will present on its key priorities with emphasis on the development of a policy to recognize Aboriginal Institutes as part Ontario's higher education system, and efforts to support Indigenous language revitalization.

Learning through Sport - An On Country Football League in Central Australia

Topic: Nationhood & Sustainability

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27472 Learning through Sport - An On Country Football League in Central Australia 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Barry Judd (Pitjantjatjara/Australia)
Aleryk Fricker (Dja Dja Wurrung,Dja Dja Wurrung)
This workshop explores the operation of On Country Australian Football at the remote community of Papunya in the Northern Territory. The playing and organisation of football by and for the Anangu peoples of Central Australia constitutes an important expression of Aboriginal sovereignty in context of post-NT Intervention politics. Football along with traditional 'lore business' remains one of few areas of social life where Anangu exercise decision making authority. Football is therefore an important realm in which young men learn from Elders. This workshop explores On Country football as a realm of Anangu learning and asks why formal education systems fail to recognise this.

Basketballtanga: An indigenous approach to basketball and youth development.

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27635 Basketballtanga: An indigenous approach to basketball and youth development. 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Jordaan Tuitama (Maori/Samoan,New Zealand - Waikato Tainui) Kawerau is a hot spot of untapped talented young people and after moving to the struggling town 4 years ago I decided this was an opportunity to help build resilient young men and women to become contributing members of society. How? Through absolute domination and butt kicking at the local basketball court and along the way teaching important values about character and life. Fast forward 4 years and we have Basketballtanga. A programme focused on youth development through teaching fundamental skills of Basketball through Ngā Atua Māori (Maori Gods) and along the way develop some positive lasting relationships with youth who will one day return the favour for the next generation.

Native Mascots as a Barrier to Indigenous Edcuation

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27438 Native Mascots as a Barrier to Indigenous Edcuation 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Brad Gallant (Qalipu Mi'kmaq,Canada)
Dominic Beaudry (Wikwemikong First Nation,Canada)
JP Allard (NA,Canada)
Native mascots as a barrier to indigenous education. For indigenous students, they are a daily reminder of the second class treatment that they receive in public schools and mainstream society. In this panel, we will discuss why the presence of native mascot symbols, names and wear in schools is contradictory to government commitments to Safe and Accepting Schools.

The Mauri Compass: Restoring the Life Force of a River or Ocean.

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27370 The Mauri Compass: Restoring the Life Force of a River or Ocean. 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Ian Ruru (Maori,Aotearoa New Zealand)
Joanne Pere (Maori,Aotearoa New Zealand)
Mona Lisa Smith (Maori,Aotearoa New Zealand)
Raymond Farmer (Maori,Aotearoa New Zealand)
Anna Barber (Maori,Aotearoa New Zealand)
For half a century, sewage pollution has been a contentious issue for the indigenous Maori people of Turanganui a Kiwa, Gisborne. They have battled the local government to protect and restore the mauri and life-force of their rivers and ocean. One positive result of the legal battle has seen the Gisborne District Council imposed with a Resource Consent condition to improve the mauri of Turanganui a Kiwa. This has been a catalyst for meaningful engagement with Te Runanga o Turanganui a Kiwa and resulted in the co-development of an environmental assessment tool, the Mauri Compass. This workshop uses case studies to demonstrate the methodology and explores its application internationally.

E Ola Mau Ka Wai

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27447 E Ola Mau Ka Wai 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Mahealani Merryman (Hawaiian,Hawaii)
Marian Leong (Hawaiian,Hawaii)
Penny Martin (Hawaiian,Hawaiii)
E Ola Mau Ka Wai celebrates the resilience native communities and indigenous education by addressing the need for culture-based and place-based literacy opportunities. Hawaiian mo‘olelo (stories, history) and a multi-sensory learning approach inspire students to read and appreciate traditional Hawaiian literature focused on wai (fresh water). The project provides materials, activities, and support to educate students about fresh water and watersheds. Continued engagement of meaningful education increases understanding and appreciation of Hawaiian water resources and promotes stewardship. This project targets students in grades 3-5, teachers, and community members.

Affirming diversity and resilience: Cultural practices in Early Childhood Centres in Aotearoa

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27450 Affirming diversity and resilience: Cultural practices in Early Childhood Centres in Aotearoa 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Roimata Macfarlane (Aotearoa, New Zealand)
Jacqui Organ (Māori,Aotearoa, New Zealand)
Rika Currie (Māori,Aotearoa, New Zealand)
This workshop will engage participants in understanding how this indigenous framework from New Zealand supports Early Childhood teacher’s pedagogical approaches to support the development and resilience of early learners. The framework promotes core values that emanate from a Māori worldview of wellbeing and resilience. Five core components (Whanaungatanga/relationships, kotahitanga/unity, manaakitanga/caring, rangatiratanga/leadership, pūmanawatanga/natural talent) drive this approach. Each component explores a range of strategies for teachers. Collectively they provide a framework for an inclusive and strength-based approach to enable our young children to unlock their potential.

University Indigenous education: experiences in Canada (University of Winnipeg) and Colombia (Indigenous Autonomous University Cauca and University of Antioquia)

Topic: Nationhood & Sustainability

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27395 University Indigenous education: experiences in Canada (University of Winnipeg) and Colombia (Indigenous Autonomous University Cauca and University of Antioquia) 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Gabriel Nemoga-Soto (Muisca,Colombia)
Claire Reid (Canada)
Jennifer Ledoux (Metis,Canada)
Kevin Lamoureux (Canada)
Canada and Colombia have been engaged in truth and reconciliation processes over the last decade. Canada's TRC issued its final report in 2015, while the Colombian government and guerrilla organization FARC signed a Ceasefire and Disarmament Accord in June 2016. The policies associated with these reconciliation and peace processes will impact Indigenous peoples' ability to access and assert their rights towards increased self-determination. The panel will bring together leading institutional and Indigenous university education initiatives that acknowledge Indigenous worldviews and aim to utilize education programs in achieving full recognition of Indigenous peoples within their states. Hospitality in Education: The case of the Master’s in Development Practice: Indigenous Development, UWinnipeg

Haudenosaunee Food Ways; bringing culture and language to life for students

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27627 Haudenosaunee Food Ways; bringing culture and language to life for students 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Janice Brant (Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte,Mohawk Nation Kanyenkeha'ka) This workshop is an opportunity to look at the art, science and spirituality of traditional Haudenosaunee foods. We will share experiences of cultivating, harvesting, preparing, and eating traditional foods with indigenous students. We will discuss what we learned. What we can observe about the students, relationships, and identity by interacting with our foods. How are we creating experiential learning opportunities with food for indigenous students in diverse settings and circumstances? And, in what ways can these teaching and examples help us celebrate and strengthen the place and role indigenous foods have in our resilience?

¿What can we learn from Wejën Kajën; a point of view of Ayuuk people, in Education?

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27710 ¿What can we learn from Wejën Kajën; a point of view of Ayuuk people, in Education? 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday XAAB NOP VARGAS VASQUEZ (MIXE,México) For more than eight years, I focused on research in Wejën Kajën, a point of view from Ayuujk people located in Oaxaca, Mexico, about learning and teaching, in fact about education. My reflections are in Ayuujk but I’m trying to share those in Spanish and in English. In this talk, I decided to present the state of art about Wejën Kajën, from my current researches and from the point of views of other colleagues. Finally I will discuss the question: What can we learn from Wejën Kajën point of View? The ground for this decision was my feeling, as a researcher and teacher educator, that the relevance of research from indigenous point of views deserves explicit discussion and Wejën Kajën is an

TUMITCHIAT: IÑUQQAAT AULLARRISIATUN IḶISAĠVIIT A NEW PATHWAY: INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27674 TUMITCHIAT: IÑUQQAAT AULLARRISIATUN IḶISAĠVIIT A NEW PATHWAY: INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP IN HIGHER EDUCATION 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Pearl Brower (USA) After centuries of colonization and assimilation policies in education, Indigenous people are making commitments to nurture the next generation of Indigenous leaders. An area of focus is on Indigenous leadership through various forms of Higher Education. This presentation supports the need for Indigenous leadership programs with a foundation in Indigenous ways of knowing and learning. It will define Indigenous leadership. Specific Indigenous leadership programs are described. The presentation concludes with an overview and syllabus for an Arctic Indigenous leadership. The intent is to provide a path that others may use to create their own programs to meet their Indigenous communities' need.

Wahpeton Dakota Nation Dakota Language Project

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27406 Wahpeton Dakota Nation Dakota Language Project 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Otto Fietz (Lac La Ronge Indian Band,Lac La Ronge Indian Band)
John Waditaka (Wahpeton Dakota Nation,Wahpeton Dakota Nation)
Beverly Waditaka (Wahpeton Dakota Nation,Wahpeton Dakota Nation)
Wahpeton Dakota Nation in cooperation with the Education Department of the Prince Albert Grand Council created Dakota Language Scope and Sequence charts from Kindergarten to Grade Nine. The Scope and Sequence charts have become the foundation of an app that has 17 categories, 2 videos and cultural notes section. The presentation will tell the story of how the Scope and Sequence charts were created with the guidance and direction of Wahpeton Dakota Nation Elders and local Dakota Language experts. The story of how the app was created will then be shared and a demonstration of the app will follow. Time will be set aside for questions.

Aboriginal Australian storywork and the decolonisation of racism within education: Maridyulu Gagamari Burrugin (The Four ‘Clevermen’ and the Echidna):

Topic: Teaching Indigenous Histories

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27424 Aboriginal Australian storywork and the decolonisation of racism within education: Maridyulu Gagamari Burrugin (The Four ‘Clevermen’ and the Echidna): 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Gawaian Bodkin-Andrews (D'harawal/Aboriginal/Australian)
Frances Bodkin (Centre for the Advancement of Indigenous Knowledges, University of Technology Sydney,D'harawal/Aboriginal/Australian)
Gavin Andrews (Centre for the Advancement of Indigenous Knowledges, University of Technology Sydney,D'harawal/Aboriginal/Australian)
Within Australia, an expanding research base has focused on both the nature and impact of racism from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives. This research has not only highlighted the entrenched and systemic nature of racism within Australia, but also revealed how racism cannot be solely understood from non-Indigenous epistemologies. This workshop shall critically engage with such research, and explore how the findings may be applicable to educational outcomes and policies today. The themes emerging from this critical review will also be tied into the multiple layers of meaning found within a D'harawal Law Story teaching of the consequences of the misuse of knowledge.

The motivations and learning experiences of non-Maori secondary school students learning the Maori language.

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27709 The motivations and learning experiences of non-Maori secondary school students learning the Maori language. 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Will Flavell (Nga Puhi, Ngati Maniapoto, Ngati Whatua, Tainui,New Zealand) The Maori language is the indigenous language of New Zealand. In 1987, te reo Maori (the Maori language) gained status as an official language alongside English. The latest data shows four percent of non-Maori secondary school students are learning te reo Maori. There has been little, if any research which shows the motivations and learning experiences of non-Maori secondary school students learning the Maori language in English-medium settings. The purpose of this presentation is to examine the factors that influence non-Maori students in an English-medium secondary school to learn the Maori language.

Dismissing Cultural Values In the Workplace - Affecting Indigenous Employees Motivation and Identity

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27661 Dismissing Cultural Values In the Workplace - Affecting Indigenous Employees Motivation and Identity 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Maxwell Jackson (Australian Aboriginal Nyungar (Ballardong/Whadjuk)) Indigenous employment programs are linked to future social change in Australia, with success measured by how stakeholders perform in workplaces roles. Issues arise when intrinsic cultural values are seen to be workplace redundant. Managers must accept how these characteristics cannot left at the door as they significantly influence stakeholder identity, motivation and behavior. Recently, my Masters Thesis "An Investigation How Customary Nyungar Practices Can Impact Stakeholder Relationships with Industry" explored how Indigenous values impact workplaces. I hope to explore the International perspective of a PHD to examine negative effects from dismissing these cultural values in workplaces that service Indigenous stakeholders.

Ignite Session 6: Innovations in Indigenous Education - Thursday, July 27th - 13:00-13:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27773 Ignite Session 6: Innovations in Indigenous Education 01:00 PM 01:15 PM Thursday Aha! Ha! A...!
27774 Ignite Session 6: Innovations in Indigenous Education 01:15 PM 01:30 PM Thursday 'Bininj kunwaral, Bininj dawhodnan' 'Our spirit, Our Tecaher': Innovations in cultural arts education and knowledge sharing
27775 Ignite Session 6: Innovations in Indigenous Education 01:30 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Cultural Maintanance & Capacity building through the Arts

Ignite Session 87: Culturally Responsive Education - Thursday, July 27th - 13:00-13:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
28016 Ignite Session 87: Culturally Responsive Education 01:00 PM 01:15 PM Thursday Culture within a Culture: Embracing generational attributes to promote first year Native Hawaiian college student success
28017 Ignite Session 87: Culturally Responsive Education 01:15 PM 01:30 PM Thursday Use of Restorative Justice in a School Setting - the PASS Program at Santa Fe Indian School
28018 Ignite Session 87: Culturally Responsive Education 01:30 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Mā te kaha o te waka hourua tātou katoa e eke noa - We’re all in this together using the strength of a twin hulled canoe.

Ignite Session 93: Culturally Responsive Education - Thursday, July 27th - 13:00-13:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
28034 Ignite Session 93: Culturally Responsive Education 01:00 PM 01:15 PM Thursday Nga whanau tokorima, a five step programme for practitioners, lecturers and support services to align their formal training with cultural awareness, when working with community and students.
28035 Ignite Session 93: Culturally Responsive Education 01:15 PM 01:30 PM Thursday Indigenous (Anishinabek) Worldview and Institutional Success: Theory, Practice and Results of an Anishinabe Odziiwin Program on Mnidoo Mnising (Manitoulin Island, Northern Ontario
28036 Ignite Session 93: Culturally Responsive Education 01:30 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Fusing First Nations Studies into the Academy

Ignite Session 59: Indigenous Languages - Thursday, July 27th - 13:00-13:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27932 Ignite Session 59: Indigenous Languages 01:00 PM 01:15 PM Thursday Aboriginal Literacy Foundations, Language and Cultural Affirmation- A Case Study
27933 Ignite Session 59: Indigenous Languages 01:15 PM 01:30 PM Thursday Mechif revitalization and mainstream education in Canada
27934 Ignite Session 59: Indigenous Languages 01:30 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Indigenizing the Grocery Shopping Experience: Cultivating the Linguistic Landscape of Our Community

Ignite Session 97: Indigenous Pedagogy - Thursday, July 27th - 13:00-13:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
28046 Ignite Session 97: Indigenous Pedagogy 01:00 PM 01:15 PM Thursday Universities and Culture; Walking the Talk
28047 Ignite Session 97: Indigenous Pedagogy 01:15 PM 01:30 PM Thursday WÄnanga - a way of knowing and doing
28048 Ignite Session 97: Indigenous Pedagogy 01:30 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Guyunggu Nyumba (Darkinjung/Yugambeh) way of being informing a framework of professional learning for teachers

Ignite Session 91: Culturally Responsive Education - Thursday, July 27th - 13:00-13:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
28028 Ignite Session 91: Culturally Responsive Education 01:00 PM 01:15 PM Thursday Partnerships and Pedagogy: Building capacity for non-Indigenous educational systems to improve achievement for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in mainstream schools.
28029 Ignite Session 91: Culturally Responsive Education 01:15 PM 01:30 PM Thursday Tahua Taunaki Akonga (Learner support)
28030 Ignite Session 91: Culturally Responsive Education 01:30 PM 01:45 PM Thursday The Indigenous Portfolio Process

Ignite Session 101: Partnerships in Education - Thursday, July 27th - 13:00-13:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
28058 Ignite Session 101: Partnerships in Education 01:00 PM 01:15 PM Thursday Journey of Indigenous Scholars in Collaboration: Travel Study Peru
28059 Ignite Session 101: Partnerships in Education 01:15 PM 01:30 PM Thursday The International Indigenous Exchange Consortium: ‘Moondani Toombadool’ across the globe
28060 Ignite Session 101: Partnerships in Education 01:30 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Resilience in Collaboration - The Hui Fono Cross Cultural Experience

FEATURE PRESENTATION: "Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage - Education & Rediscovery"

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27543 FEATURE PRESENTATION: "Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage - Education & Rediscovery" 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Nainoa Thompson (Native Hawaiian,USA)

To Mālama Honua is to take care and protect all that makes up our planet. From the lands to the seas to perpetuating indigenous cultures across the globe, the Hawaiian sailing canoe, Hōkūleʻa, has been on a three year historic Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage.

The voyage connects communities and countries through stories of hope and wisdom-utilizing these different perspectives as guides to solving some of the world's greatest challenges. This session will present the three year voyage undertaken to inspire and share values and actions to Mālama Honua and impact on education and leadership through the Promise to Children and Promise to PaeʻĀina

www.hokulea.com 

Guyunggu Nyumba (Darkinjung/Yugambeh) way of being informing a framework of professional learning for teachers

Topic: Indigenous Pedagogy

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28265 Guyunggu Nyumba (Darkinjung/Yugambeh) way of being informing a framework of professional learning for teachers 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday

The land waits, moving beyond taking with giving back - Finding a balance through Aboriginal ways of seeing, knowing and being. As part of completing an EdD, I am developing a Framework of cultural knowledge and concepts to inform professional learning opportunities for non-Aboriginal teachers bringing answers to such questions as: What does respect and reciprocity mean? How can teachers put this into classroom practice? This workshop provides participants with an opportunity to consider, experience and critically reflect on some of the learning opportunities proposed, thus contributing to the ongoing development of the Framework.

Sidax̱gigathl Gag̱oodim̓ (strengthening ourselves, our hearts) through the language and wisdom of our peoples

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28428 Sidax̱gigathl Gag̱oodim̓ (strengthening ourselves, our hearts) through the language and wisdom of our peoples 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Amy (Nox Ayaa Wilt) Parent (Nisga'a,Canada)
Keane (Walaks) Tait (Nisga'a,Canada)
We aim to share our stories of teaching and learning in a Sim’algax oral language course that began in the fall of 2016. This course utilizes the techniques of the “Where are your keys” (Gardner, 2016) method to enhance the language proficiency of Vancouver Nisga’a language learners. We will share highlights of the pre-language self-assessments administered at the beginning of the course, as well as video logs taken throughout it, to track our language acquisition process. Finally, we weave our stories together through Txeemsim (trickster), a now familiar friend who has a knack for bringing new light to the complexities of Sim’algax urban language revitalization.

Reconciliation (policy, programs, curriculum, experience) in Australian Public Schools: a snapshot

Topic: Public Education for Reconciliation

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28438 Reconciliation (policy, programs, curriculum, experience) in Australian Public Schools: a snapshot 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Scott Gorringe (Mithaka,Australia)
Ginibi Robinson (Aboriginal Australian,Bundjalung Nation)
Talia Avrahamzon (Australia)
The Australian curriculum requires teachers and children to engage closely with 'reconciliation' as a cross-curriculum priority. The workshop will draw on initial findings of a study focussing on 8-10 year olds' experiences on how they are socialised about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, cultures, and peoples, and reconciliation in Australian public schools. This workshop also draws on the experiences of staff in the State Education Department in their review and development of their own Reconciliation Action Plan (2016-19), a growing focus in schools, Government agencies and business to engage in reconciliation.

The role of Indigenous ambassadors at QUT

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28441 The role of Indigenous ambassadors at QUT 01:00 PM 01:45 PM Thursday Todd Crawford (Aboriginal Australian)
Emily Wells (Aboriginal ,Australia)
Jed Fraser (Oodergoo Unit,Aboriginal Australian)
Jade Scammell (Aboriginal Australian)
The Queensland University of Technology (QUT) uses student ambassadors throughout the university to encourage high school students and the wider community to consider tertiary education. The Indigenous ambassadors at QUT are involved in a number of these roles. Including involvement with Indigenous university students from commencement of study through to completion, explore uni ambassadors working with high school students, Oodgeroo unit ambassadors attending expos and community events such as NAIDOC and finally working with high school students through the Oodgeroo Unit for school visits and programs such as the SID winter school. The presenters are all active student ambassadors at QUT.

UniBound Programme

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28182 UniBound Programme 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Peni Fa'alogo (Samoan,Samoa)
Kesaia Tapueluelu (Tongan,New Zealand)
Therese Kiely (Samoan,New Zealand)
Tracking stars: Actioning Tinto to increase student completion in the UniBound Academic Preparation Programme, University of Auckland.
28183 UniBound Programme 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Peni Fa'alogo (Samoan,Samoa)
Kesaia Tapueluelu (Tongan,New Zealand)
Therese Kiely (Samoan,New Zealand)
UniBound Programme: Building academic resilience in school leavers without university entrance doing degree courses.

Telling Australia's Hidden History

Topic: Teaching Indigenous Histories

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28172 Telling Australia's Hidden History 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday How to start a revolution in 7 days. The #SOSBLAKAUSTRALIA story
28173 Telling Australia's Hidden History 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday AUSTRALIA'S BLAK HISTORY MONTH - 10 years strong

Teacher Education Programs for Teaching Indigenous Languages

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28168 Teacher Education Programs for Teaching Indigenous Languages 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Michael Jarrett (Australia)
Susan Poetsch (Australia)
Developing the skills of Aboriginal language teachers: behind the scenes of Gumbaynggirr professional learning workshops
28169 Teacher Education Programs for Teaching Indigenous Languages 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Katarina Edmonds (Maori,NZ Maori)
Hemi Dale ()
The challenges of delivering university curriculum to initial teacher educators with wide ranging levels of Maori language proficiency

Disrupting negative portrayals of Noongar people in the Western Australian news media

Topic: Arts

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27371 Disrupting negative portrayals of Noongar people in the Western Australian news media 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Simon Forrest (Australia)
Dawn Bennett (Australia)
Michelle Johnston (Australia)
Bonita Mason (Australia)
Chris Thomson (Australia)
Since 2013, we have delivered a unit of learning called Aboriginal Community Engagement (ACE) that partners media students with Indigenous people to tell stories that celebrate Indigenous achievements, address Indigenous affairs issues, and disrupt negative news coverage. Delivered on the country of the Noongar people of south-western Australia, ACE encourages reconciliation and the revelation of misrecognised social truths. Our lecture will explore how five pedagogical approaches – on-country visits; critical reflexivity; place sensitivity; action research; and service learning – are employed to impart cross-cultural literacy that students are carrying into their professional practices.

Knowledge Keepers

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27360 Knowledge Keepers 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Jonathan Hamilton-Diabo (Mohawk,Canada)
Lee Maracle (Salish,Canada)
Andrew Wesley (Cree,Canada)
Eileen Antone (Oneida,Canada)
Grafton Antone (Oneida,Canada)
Ernie Sandy (Ojibwe,Canada)
Janice Longboat (Mohawk,Canada)
The role of Traditional Knowledge Keepers (Elders, Traditional Teachers) have always had a vital role in Indigenous communities across Turtle Island. In the past two decades, institutions have taken multiple approaches to integrate them, ranging from Visiting Elders to becoming faculty members themselves. At the University of Toronto, many methods are used to engage Knowledge Keepers, such as the Elder-in-Residence or Visiting Elders Programs, and more recently, the establishment of the Elders Circle. This session will provide an opportunity for participants to hear directly from Elder Circle members about their work and their role in the transformation of post-secondary institutions.

Stronger Smarter Jarjums

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27499 Stronger Smarter Jarjums 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Fiona Bobongie (Darunbal people in Central Queensland,Australia)
Dyonne Anderson (Bundjalung Northern NSW,Australia)
Michal Purcell (Butchulla Fraser Island,Australia)
We believe a positive sense of cultural identity is essential for educational success. The Stronger Smarter Approach builds this strong positive identity for children and their families through collaborative communication processes in which we describe as ‘High-Expectations Relationships’. Our approach asks everyone to take responsibility for change. We ask everyone to join us in raising our expectations – not only for Indigenous children, parents and communities but also of ourselves. Learning starts the day we are born. A high quality education early in life will give our Jarjums the best start. Early childhood educators are in a powerful position to provide our Jarjums with the foundation for the rest of their lives. In early childhood, relationships are at the heart of everything. The best outcomes occur when educators and family members work together. Nurturing relationships, positive interactions, and a strong sense of identity are all vital to the self-esteem and emotional wellbeing of our Jarjums. Stronger Smarter Jarjums introduces the concept of High-Expectations Relationships to build stronger relationships with Jarjums and their families and ensure greater collaboration in decision-making.

Indigenous Institutional Building through Community Engagement

Topic: Nationhood & Sustainability

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27498 Indigenous Institutional Building through Community Engagement 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Dr Verna Billy Minnabarriet (Canada , Shuswap, First Nation)
Dr. Deborah Canada (Metis,Metis, Canada)
Access to Post-Secondary education continues to be an issue for rural and remote First Nations, Metis and Inuit people and communities. Many individuals do not have the option of leaving their communities, families or support systems. The alternative is to bring the post-secondary experience to them. This workshop will highlight two very innovative experiences which builds NVIT as an institution, engages community partnerships and the BC Ministry of Advanced Education. The Community Partnership engagements will explore how building community capacity lends itself to the capacity building of rural and remote communities. The second is how NVIT builds is staff and faculty credentials.

Science Through An Indigenous Lens - A Moth Study

Topic: Indigenous Pedagogy

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27419 Science Through An Indigenous Lens - A Moth Study 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Tiahuia Kawe-Small (Raukawa ki Wharepuuhunga,New Zealand)
Donna Moses-Heeney (Ngaati Awa,New Zealand)
Aotearoa-New Zealand is home to some 2000 species of moths of which 85% are endemic. This workshop will present an indigenous student voice in the scientific study of moths in our school environment; address some of the cultural challenges faced with western scientific approaches and a research/iwi collaboration that produced amazing resources that reflect indigenous knowledge.

"E tu i to tu: remoulding traditional Maori concepts of behaviour in teacher education"

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27679 "E tu i to tu: remoulding traditional Maori concepts of behaviour in teacher education" 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Rangi te Whiu JURY (Lead Academic) (Ngati Raukawa) Traditional Māori concepts of behaviour have been diluted and misinterpreted since colonisation. The time is now to re-examine our understanding of 'whakamā' as a reflective tool, in order to shape our future. By definition, whakamā means to be ashamed, shy, bashful and or embarrassed. This need not be a negative concept; it can be seen in a positive light, as a trigger for transformative action. Case studies will demonstrate how we can appraise the mistakes of the past in order to move into the future, with a strong focus on Māori concepts of behaviour in our teaching and learning. The tribal strategy of Whakatupuranga Rua Mano will be discussed as one example of how this can produce

Separating Mortuary Byproducts from a Municipal Sewage System

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27369 Separating Mortuary Byproducts from a Municipal Sewage System 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Raymond Farmer (Maori,Aotearoa New Zealand)
Ian Ruru (Maori,Aotearoa New Zealand)
Joanne Pere (Maori,Aotearoa New Zealand)
Mona Lisa Smith (Maori,Aotearoa New Zealand)
Anna Barber (Maori,Aotearoa New Zealand)
To Maori, all parts from tupapaku, the deceased, are extremely tapu and sacred and should be treated with respect and dignity. For half a century mortuary byproducts have formed part of the Gisborne municipal sewage system which has been discharged into its rivers and ocean. This practice violates all cultural and Maori scientific views and degrades the mauri and life force of Turanganui a Kiwa and its people. The practice has been contentious. Recently, local tribes through Te Runanga o Turanganui a Kiwa have made progress with the Gisborne District Council to investigate land-based solutions. This workshop provides the background to and the alternative solutions for this dilemma.

Working Towards Reconciliation in Mi'kma'ki through a Co-Learning Journey

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27392 Working Towards Reconciliation in Mi'kma'ki through a Co-Learning Journey 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Stephen Augustine (Hereditary Chief)
Kathy Snow ()
Emily Root ()
Mary Beth Doucette ()
Unama'ki College at Cape Breton University offered an open-access, blended delivery, course during the 2016 winter term. Learning from Knowledge Keepers of Mi'kma'ki(MIKM 2701), surpassed enrollment expectations of the university and attracted learners from 16 different countries worldwide as well as from across Canada. Throughout the course, different people emerged as leaders and learners on the varied spaces the course conversations were held in: Facebook, Twitter and Face-to-Face. Reflections on learning and analysis of interactions online provided evidence to describe the co-learning process of the varied participants. Emergent themes from the co-learning journey will be shared.

Our Indigenous Spirit Journey: A land-based Education Program through an Indigenous Lens

Topic: Indigenous Pedagogy

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27393 Our Indigenous Spirit Journey: A land-based Education Program through an Indigenous Lens 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Cat Mark Criger (Cayuga, Turtle Clan from Six Nations)
Jane New (Canadian)
Melissa Berger (Canadian)
MaryEllen Gucciardi (Canadian)
This workshop explores the impact of combining Indigenous teachings with outdoor curriculum linked learning on youth facing life challenges as observed during the Indigenous Spirit Journey Program in Ontario.The ISJ brings university and high school partners together with community agencies for a program that interweaves three core components: Indigenous Aboriginal teachings and philosophies, edible gardening and horticulture therapy and field science. Designed to provide positive life and career pathways, promote intercultural understanding and build resilience, the program uses nature as a catalyst for change while fostering community partnerships and engagement

Indigenous Empowered Education: Cultivating Cultural Identity

Topic: Governance

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27507 Indigenous Empowered Education: Cultivating Cultural Identity 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Kyrie Ransom (Kanienkehaka (Mohawk),Mohawks of Akwesasne (Canada)/Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe (U.S.))
James Ransom (Canada/United States)
Education has been used by colonizers as a tool of assimilation, by systematically stripping away children’s cultural identity. A 200% education model realigns school systems to provide 100% education from existing curricula, with an additional 100% of cultural content. Examining the complex Akwesasne education system, this workshop provides a qualitative analysis of the 1996 takeover of the St. Regis Mohawk School and the resiliency of Mohawk parents asserting their rights and responsibilities to educate their children. As a result of a 200% education model, students possess strong cultural identity when going outside of their communities in pursuit of higher education.

Reconcili-Action through the Arts

Topic: Arts

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27508 Reconcili-Action through the Arts 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Ruby Medicine Crane (Blackfoot,Canada)
Jamie Medicine Crane (Blackfoot,Canada)
Teaching our children traditions, history & culture is vital to their identities. So they know who they are,where they come from & can see where they can go. It was the Chiefs who signed Treaty 7 that prophesied, “the future generations will not fight with bow & arrows. They will fight with the knowledge of two worlds.” This presentation is interactive & engaging with respect to traditional and contemporary ways of learning through dance and music to build resiliency, share teachings, and learn about history and culture.This workshop will identify&share Reconcili-Action through experiences,teaching strategies/activities,dance demonstrations,technology,live music & audience participation.

Maori, Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islanders Principals Collaboration

Topic: Partnerships in Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27420 Maori, Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islanders Principals Collaboration 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Leanne Lloyd -Otene (Maori,Ngatikuri Nga Puhi Maori New Zealand)
Myles Ferris (Maori,Ngati Porou Maori New Zealand)
Dyonne Anderson (Bunjalung Nation on the far North Coasts of NSW,Aboriginal Australia, Bundjalung)
Maori Principals Association, New Zealand (Te Akatea) and The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Principals Association Australia (NATSIPA) have jointly collaborated to strategically support each other and to provide Professional support and development for its combined membership.The two organisations have been working together informally since 2012 and in 2016 they formalised their relationship at their inaugural bi-annual conference. Together the Executives of Te Akatea and NATSIPA will present their strategic plan and their visions for growing the capacity and capabilities of indigenous leaders, as well as being a voice for their peoples at National Policy level.

Strengthing our Community Foundation

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27435 Strengthing our Community Foundation 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Callie Hill (Kanyenkeha,Canada/Kanyenkeha/Kanyenkehaka)
Maracle Bonnie Jane (Kanyenkeha,Canada/Kanyenkeha/Kanyenkehaka)
Janice Hill (Kanyenkehaka,Canada/Kanyenkeha/Kanyenkehaka)
Tsi Tyónnheht Onkwawén:na Language and Cultural Centre is a community-based organization with a mandate to revitalize and restore Kanyen'keha:ka language, culture and tradition through education and community-based programs. Programs include a nursery, a primary immersion school (K-4), an adult language program and community outreach. The outreach activities include weekend cultural workshops/talks, in-house language lessons at community organizations and historical commemorative events. There has been a tremendous growth in terms of language and culture in the community over a relatively short period of time. This workshop will discuss the evolution of the organization since its inception.

Resilience thru Action—partnering to strengthen native identity & persistence through policy, practice, and advocacy.

Topic: Nationhood & Sustainability

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27548 Resilience thru Action—partnering to strengthen native identity & persistence through policy, practice, and advocacy. 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Walter Kahumoku III (Native Hawaiian,United States)
Priscilla Maynor (Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina,United States)
Over the last few decades, more and more indigenous communities have sought to take control of the education received by their young. To take control of native education, this presentation provides indigenous educational stakeholders with strength-based, native strategies that help to transmute educational systems for their students. We will provide specific tools, processes and frameworks for improving the well-being of generations through education.

Culturally Grounded Education Alliance: The Whitecap Dakota First Nation & Saskatoon Public Schools Co-Governance Model

Topic: Partnerships in Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27550 Culturally Grounded Education Alliance: The Whitecap Dakota First Nation & Saskatoon Public Schools Co-Governance Model 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Darcy Bear (Canada/Dakota)
Ray Morrison (n/a,Canada)
In 2014, the Whitecap Dakota First Nation and the Saskatoon Public Schools came together to sign an Education Partnership agreement, which promotes resilience and Indigenous sustainability through education. The Education Partnership with WDFN and SPS demonstrates a joint vision to provide the best available education to students while also respecting and supporting the Dakota culture and language. The development of this model addresses TRC Calls to Action related to Education. This presentation will bring together key decision-makers from WDFN and SPS to discuss the development of this innovative model and best practices coming out of the implementation of the agreement.

Te Ara Raukura (Pathway of Chiefs)

Topic: Partnerships in Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27549 Te Ara Raukura (Pathway of Chiefs) 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Porsha London (New Zealand)
Raniera Dallas (Ngati Tuwharetoa Ngati Raukawa Ngai Tahu Ngati Mamoe,New Zealand, Ngai Tahu)
In New Zealand the Ministry of Education has made a commitment to increasing the indigenous Māori student secondary school achievement success. As a result of the MoE commitment to realizing success “Te Ara Raukura” (pathway of chiefs) was formed as a partnership between the local indigenous Māori (Iwi, tribe) the MoE and seven secondary schools in the delivery of a collaborative leadership program. Te Ara Raukura is designed to develop agency for youth aged 13 to 15 years in order to effect change within their own schools. In this presentation we provide the findings from this action research intervention framework and highlight key enablers and challenges to realizing longterm success.

a celebration and resilience for indigenous higher education in Taiwan

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27578 a celebration and resilience for indigenous higher education in Taiwan 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Mimi Taraw (Amis people,Taiwan)
Yi-fang Chen (Taiwan)
Learning, Knowledge, and the Transmission of Culture: A Study Based on the Course ‘Introduction to Ethnic Art’. This article is based on the teaching experience of the course ‘Introduction to Ethnic Art’ in the higher education in Taiwan. I examine the dynamic process between the course design of the teacher and the learning of the students. Given the fact that the backgrounds of the students are diverse, the course has become one of multi-cultural education and of indigenous education. This complicated situation is further explained by using the example of craft as a way of cultural learning, and the construction of knowledge that is embedded in the process of learning.

Looking Forward Towards the End of Life: resilience matters

Topic:

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27405 Looking Forward Towards the End of Life: resilience matters 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Jennifer Carter (Maori,Raukawa- Aotearoa)
Jennie Barr ()
Anthony Welch ()
Resilience, the ability to bounce back from trauma is a powerful ally for people experiencing the end of the life.Understanding resilience across cultures and in context is an important beginning for culturally competent health professionals.Being aware of a person’s level of resilience on initial contact is crucial so that life enhancing questions can be addressed. This workshop will invite participants to review and discuss resilience scales required for assessing the resilience of those who have been given a terminal diagnosis.The intention being, that the reviewed tools will be introduced into the medical lexicon alongside the non-medical role of end of life doulas.

Bridging the Gap - Indigenous and non-Indigenous Relationships

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27488 Bridging the Gap - Indigenous and non-Indigenous Relationships 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Kallie Wood (Lead Presenter/ First Nation - Carry The Kettle, Sintaluta, SK,Canada)
Chris McKee (Non-Indigenous Business Partner of Kallie Wood)
Kallie and Chris ignite audiences all over North America. They electrify rooms of all ages and quicken peoples hearts on the pathway of reconciliation and relationships must change. The entire presentation focuses on Truth and Reconciliation and the steps necessary for sustainable change and success. Kallie shares her story of residential school and 60's Scoop and walks the audience through to today's current reality for her people. Chris shares his story of misconceptions of Indigenous people due to being unaware and under educated in regards to the history. This workshop bridges the gap and answers why? reconciliation from Indigenous and non-Indigenous viewpoints.

Ignite Session 5: Culturally Responsive Education - Thursday, July 27th - 14:00-14:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27770 Ignite Session 5: Culturally Responsive Education 02:00 PM 02:15 PM Thursday Beyond Critical Theory: Indigenous models of natural democracy
27771 Ignite Session 5: Culturally Responsive Education 02:15 PM 02:30 PM Thursday Indigenous (Anishinabek) Worldview Inclusion in Early Childhood Education: One Approach to Partnerships and Provincially Accredited Program Development on Mnidoo Mnising (Manitoulin Island, Northern Ontario)
27772 Ignite Session 5: Culturally Responsive Education 02:30 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Tricessment- Nga reo e toru: Building meaningful partnerships for children’s learning.

Ignite Session 57: Culturally Responsive Education - Thursday, July 27th - 14:00-14:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27926 Ignite Session 57: Culturally Responsive Education 02:00 PM 02:15 PM Thursday Sqwiqw'l Centres: A Place-based Oral Language Development Program
27927 Ignite Session 57: Culturally Responsive Education 02:15 PM 02:30 PM Thursday "The Jungle School" education for the Sumatran hunter gatherer
27928 Ignite Session 57: Culturally Responsive Education 02:30 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Ovttas|Aktan|Aktesne. A repository of sámi learning materials

Ignite Session 31: Innovations in Indigenous Education - Thursday, July 27th - 14:00-14:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27848 Ignite Session 31: Innovations in Indigenous Education 02:00 PM 02:15 PM Thursday Ngura Health and Education program
27849 Ignite Session 31: Innovations in Indigenous Education 02:15 PM 02:30 PM Thursday Dream of Wild Health: Reclaiming Indigenous Realtionships To Food, Land And Culture By Growing Garden Warriors
27850 Ignite Session 31: Innovations in Indigenous Education 02:30 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Animations for Health: Australian school students and university students using digital media for creative health education

Ignite Session 41: Indigenous Pedagogy - Thursday, July 27th - 14:00-14:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27878 Ignite Session 41: Indigenous Pedagogy 02:00 PM 02:15 PM Thursday Indigenous knowledges in cultural competence education
27879 Ignite Session 41: Indigenous Pedagogy 02:15 PM 02:30 PM Thursday Indigenous Cultural Protocols in Higher Education
27880 Ignite Session 41: Indigenous Pedagogy 02:30 PM 02:45 PM Thursday The Navigators Path - a teaching, learning and pastoral framework driven my manako (mind), ngaakau (heart), koopuu (belly) and vaerua (spirit)

Ignite Session 28: Culturally Responsive Education - Thursday, July 27th - 14:00-14:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27839 Ignite Session 28: Culturally Responsive Education 02:00 PM 02:15 PM Thursday Paiwan language immersion preschool's experiences: A study from Pingho tribal day care center to Taiwu primary school kindergarten in Taiwan
27840 Ignite Session 28: Culturally Responsive Education 02:15 PM 02:30 PM Thursday The MMAK: A Holistic Study of an Anishinaabemowin Immersion School
27841 Ignite Session 28: Culturally Responsive Education 02:30 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Building Native Early Childhood Education from within Native Communities

Ignite Session 10: Partnerships in Education - Thursday, July 27th - 14:00-14:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27785 Ignite Session 10: Partnerships in Education 02:00 PM 02:15 PM Thursday Solid Ground: A Collaborative Approach
27786 Ignite Session 10: Partnerships in Education 02:15 PM 02:30 PM Thursday "Weaving Our Story" - A Systems Approach (School District No.57): Weaving together Aboriginal Education with the Newly Revised British Columbia Curriculum
27787 Ignite Session 10: Partnerships in Education 02:30 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Wadjak Northside - Growing and Learning Together

Ignite Session 81: Indigenous Pedagogy - Thursday, July 27th - 14:00-14:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27998 Ignite Session 81: Indigenous Pedagogy 02:00 PM 02:15 PM Thursday Indigenizing the Institution - Exploring Alternate Pathways to Post-Secondary Admission for Indigenous Students
27999 Ignite Session 81: Indigenous Pedagogy 02:15 PM 02:30 PM Thursday Te Kaahu Atawhai: a holistic approach to advancing educational outcomes for Maaori student nurses in a mainstream setting
28000 Ignite Session 81: Indigenous Pedagogy 02:30 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Indigenous Graduate Attributes: Systematically embedding Indigenous Knowledges in the curriculum

Maori mentors and their scholars: Post graduate supervision? A lesson in Indigenous higher learning mentoring through the stories of students and traditional master practitioners.

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28439 Maori mentors and their scholars: Post graduate supervision? A lesson in Indigenous higher learning mentoring through the stories of students and traditional master practitioners. 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Areta Kahu (Aotearoa ,New Zealand) Stories have emerged of Maori post graduate students whose supervisory experiences were horror stories such as supervisors losing work or unavailability. An investigation found that "supervision" implies a one-way traffic of information to organise and absorb; that which is given by the supervisor and taken in by the student. Essentially, a more Indigenous concept of ‘supervision and student’ such as ‘mentor and student’ or those that can be found in tribal knowledge, requires consideration. A sharing of post graduate experiences will be made. Participants will be encouraged to identify tribal stories and elements of Indigenous mentorship to formulate a framework for post graduate work.

Tū Rangatira - An Indigenous Educational Leadership Model

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28453 Tū Rangatira - An Indigenous Educational Leadership Model 02:00 PM 02:45 PM Thursday Mark Rangi ( (Maori, Aotearoa,New Zealand)
Renae Savage (Maori, Aotearoa,New Zealand)
Arihia Stirling (Maori, Aotearoa,New Zealand)
Zypheronee Kotlowski ()
This is the journey of a tribal based school's vision to develop individual and school community excellence and creativity in a vibrant, respectful and purposeful learning community to improve their ability to participate as Maori citizens of the world. It defines what indigenous leadership looks like and how to aspire to teaching students to reach their potential, and the virtues of high quality citizenship through the 7 main key leadership areas. It provides a framework for an inclusive community minded approach to the education of their children and also promotes the practice of collective, distributive and servant hood leadership in education.

My Story, Your Story - Our Story

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28144 My Story, Your Story - Our Story 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Genevieve O'Reilly (Nil,Australia) My Story, Your Story - Our Story
28145 My Story, Your Story - Our Story 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Genevieve O'Reilly (Nil,Australia) Your Story, My story, Our Story- the Chapel Project

Culture Based Leadership: Indigenous Student persistence at Utah Valley University with a CBL approach

Topic: Indigenous Pedagogy

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27526 Culture Based Leadership: Indigenous Student persistence at Utah Valley University with a CBL approach 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Victor Narsimulu (Pacific Islander/Rotuman,United States)
Kumen Louis (Navajo,United States)
This workshop will theoretically show how Cultural Envoy works with students to develop, understand and refine facets of culture, identity and lived experience to facilitate their development as scholars, leaders, and stewards of a globally interdependent community. CELP participants learn to navigate and negotiate educational, community and social spaces by sharing diverse cultural perspectives through opportunities for engagement and outreach in institutional sponsored initiatives. Our students will also perform their traditional dances that has had a powerful influence on their persistence in college and healing from historical trauma.

The decolonization of a Faculty of Education: The leadership story

Topic: Partnerships in Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27457 The decolonization of a Faculty of Education: The leadership story 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Jacqueline Ottmann (Anishinaabe,Canada/Treaty 4/Fishing Lake First Nation)
Dennis Sumara (Canada)
Sharon Friesen (Canada)
Research and literature advocate for curricula, program and policy actions that encourage collaboration between governments, learning providers and communities that supports and enhances the post-secondary education experience for Indigenous peoples (RCAP, 1996; TRC, 2015). In 2015 the Werklund School of Education Indigenous Education Task Force realized the mandate to provide recommendations to the faculty for systemic and sustainable organizational change that would support Indigenous students and faculty, and strengthen overall policy, program and curriculum development. The Dean, Vice-Dean and the Director of Indigenous Education will share this story of institutional decolonization.

Aboriginal Content and Pedagogy: Deepening Knowledge and Enhancing Teacher Education

Topic: Public Education for Reconciliation

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27477 Aboriginal Content and Pedagogy: Deepening Knowledge and Enhancing Teacher Education 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Aliesha Arndt (Mohawk- Six Nations of the Grand River)
Angela Nardozi (Settler,Canada)
We are excited to discuss our multi-faceted approach to healing and reconciliation both in teacher education, and in classrooms. This includes the importance of and instruction on; historical and contemporary issues, building relationships with Indigenous knowledge holders and community members, and amplifying Indigenous voice within the institution. We will share strategies that increase willingness and readiness to include Indigenous content in teaching, and strategies that increase student engagement with Indigenous content. We will also introduce our online repository of resources accessible to those hoping to infuse Indigenous history, culture and pedagogy into daily practice.

BUILDING YOUTH RESILIENCE THROUGH CULTURE, DANCE, SKILL-BUILDING, ACTIVITIES AND EVALUATION IN AOTEAROA NEW ZEALAND.

Topic: Nationhood & Sustainability

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27593 BUILDING YOUTH RESILIENCE THROUGH CULTURE, DANCE, SKILL-BUILDING, ACTIVITIES AND EVALUATION IN AOTEAROA NEW ZEALAND. 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Cindy Mokomoko (Kaupapa Maori Health,Aotearoa, Tribes: Te Rarawa and Te Arawa) Our programme demonstrates building youth resilience through culture, dance and leadership activities for Māori – the indigenous people of New Zealand. We will present evaluations of two annual Māori youth Leadership Academy Camps where adult and youth participatory evaluations of our programme were carried out. Alongside the annual camps, there is a weekly Hip Hop dance programme that threads cultural learning and values. The evaluation for this part of the programme is youth-led evaluation. Plans are to follow and evaluate attendees’ leadership progress over the next five years. Our programmes are culturally based.

Ngā ritenga ako tūturu: Authentic indigenous engagements towards teaching and learning

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27668 Ngā ritenga ako tūturu: Authentic indigenous engagements towards teaching and learning 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Ngaroma Williams (Te Arawa, Tainui, Mataatua ngā iwi,Tanaga whenua o Aotearoa New Zealand - NZ Māori) This fun interactive workshop offers practical applications of Māori pedagogies: song,dance,storying and reasoning. The aim of this workshop is to unite the learners into a single cohesive group learning together, mindful of, and respectful of each others needs. Creating a safe, non-threatening environment in which optimum fun learning is realised and achieved by observing: 1. Kōrero i roto i te reo anake - the absence of one's own default language 2. Me awhiawhi i ngā tikanga - the respect for customs and beliefs 3. Kia ngākau māhki – this principle is utmost important. It incorporates the human values of truth, peace, harmony, right and proper conduct, kindness and goodwill.

Dabaamalang Waybarra Miya: Mob of people weaving together, acting in concert

Topic: Arts

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27461 Dabaamalang Waybarra Miya: Mob of people weaving together, acting in concert 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Lorraine Tye (Australia/Wiradjuri/Aboriginal)
Linda Elliott (Australia)
Susan Clancy ()
For Australia's first people place is intrinsically linked with Country, the term used to describe the site their particular group has inhabited for many thousands of years. Embedded within Country is the sense of wellbeing, healing, identity and belonging that is integral with practices of the culture and language of their Nation. This paper uses the lens of one Indigenous Elder, who, over many years, has navigated her own cultural pathway through her engagement with traditional artistic fibre practices. She has used her experiences to personally call together a community of like-minded people to attend a three day Cultural event, Dabaamalang Waybarra Miya.

Decolonizing the College: A First Peoples Initiative in Action

Topic: Indigenous Pedagogy

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27445 Decolonizing the College: A First Peoples Initiative in Action 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Orenda Boucher-Curotte (Kanien’keha:ka, Haudenosaunee Confederacy, Territory of Kahnawake,Haudenosaunee Confederacy / Haudenosaunee Territory) Dawson College's First Peoples Initiative began consultations in 2014 with Indigenous community members to develop strategies to close its very large gap in the success rates between Indigenous and non-Indigenous students. Initially, Dawson had no services or programs for Indigenous students. By 2016 we had a First Peoples Centre and a college transition program for Indigenous students, both filled to capacity, and record-breaking attendance at college-wide and faculty educational opportunities on decolonization, reconciliation, resilience and resurgence. Find out how the various Indigenous communities served by Dawson have guided us through ongoing challenges in this decolonization process.

Understanding factors that attract First Nation students to research degrees

Topic: Indigenous Research Methodology & Praxis

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27446 Understanding factors that attract First Nation students to research degrees 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Michelle Trudgett (Wiradjuri (Indigenous Australian))
Susan Page (-,Aboriginal Australian)
Neil Harrison (-,-)
There is wide spread global momentum to increase the number of First Nation people undertaking Masters and Doctoral research programs. This presentation reports on findings that emerged from our Australian Research Council funded study which aims to establish a model of best practice for the supervision of Indigenous doctoral students. The study revealed a number of related factors including an understanding of why students choose to undertake research degrees at their particular institutions. We expect that these findings can contribute to the global mission of attracting more First Nation people into research degrees.

THE QUESTION WAS NOT WHETHER OR NOT TESTING, BUT ON WHOSE TERMS? -The case of National Testing in Reading for Indigenous Sami children

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27386 THE QUESTION WAS NOT WHETHER OR NOT TESTING, BUT ON WHOSE TERMS? -The case of National Testing in Reading for Indigenous Sami children 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Karen Inga Eira (Saami)
Kamil Øzerk (Norway)
Lisa Baal (Saami,Sápmi, Norway)
Jan Henry Keskitalo (Saami,Sápmi, Norway)
The aim is to highlight the background, process and the consequences of National Testing in Reading (NTR) for Indigenous Sami children in Norway. We give at short presentation of the dominating ideology behind the implementation of compulsory NTR in the mainstream Norwegian schools. We also tell more about what the Indigenous Sami people’s reaction was, and how it became to be not about whether or not NTR, but testing on whose terms? Then we take a look on what considerations are to be taken during developing the tests in the three Sami language variations that are most spoken in Norway, and what our results show.

Indigenous education: A call to action

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27397 Indigenous education: A call to action 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Yvonne Poitras Pratt (Metis)
Solange Lalonde (Metis,Metis)
Aubrey Hanson (Metis,Metis)
Patricia Danyluk (Metis,Canada)
Central to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is an ethical call to educators, educational leaders, policymakers, and other concerned citizens, to embark on the work of reconciling relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people. Werklund School of Education faculty and students have been inspired to explore, and enact a decolonizing approach through innovative programming. Working alongside Elders and instructors, students explore themes of decolonization, aesthetic expressions, and critical service-learning through a community-based project that focuses on reconciliation. In this interactive workshop, participants will create their own aesthetic response to reconciliation.

Good Intentions: A Call for Mainstream School Board Accountability

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27682 Good Intentions: A Call for Mainstream School Board Accountability 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Richard Powless (Canada) For many Ontario First Nations, our children remain within the community while they attend primary grades in school. But what happens once they leave the reserve for high school? Our students encounter an educational environment that is alien to them. Students lack the support and mentorship that the FNMI Policy Framework promises. The provincial government and First Nations communities fund the school boards but are the boards accountable to either body? This also doesn’t account for students that live off reserve and find themselves not reflected in their teachers or support staff. Our response to this inconsistency and injustice is making those accountable for our children’s education

Indigenous Education Strategy

Topic: Public Education for Reconciliation

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27698 Indigenous Education Strategy 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Taunya Paquette (Saugeen First Nation) Ontario is dedicated to improving the experience and success of Indigenous learners through the Indigenous Education Strategy. We will discuss the strategic policy context within which Ontario schools and education institutions work with Indigenous partners to set the foundation for improving achievement and well-being among Indigenous students in provincially-funded schools and supports lifelong learning. We will present the recommendations generated by Indigenous partners and education stakeholders at Ontario’s Indigenous Languages Symposium. The Symposium is the first step, in a multiyear strategy, to implement Ontario’s plan to support the revitalization of Indigenous languages.

Becoming a foremost indigenous-serving institution: Lessons from Hawaii

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27376 Becoming a foremost indigenous-serving institution: Lessons from Hawaii 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Maenette Benham (Native Hawaiian)
Nalani Balutski (Hawaiian,Hawaii)
Lui Hokoana (Hawaiian,Hawaii)
Judy Oliveira (Hawaiian,Hawaii)
Taupouri Tangaro (Hawaii)
The University of Hawaii system has adopted language articulating a commitment to becoming a foremost Indigenous-serving institution. This language follows three decades of concerted efforts by a handful of primarily Native Hawaiian staff and faculty who have dedicated their lives to college readiness and success for Native Hawaiians. This new institutional commitment is rare among public universities. Many questions arise in this exceptional situation. To begin to answer these questions we present a panel of leaders in Native Hawaiian student post-secondary success and who have used Title III funding from the U.S. Department of Education to introduce more culturally relevant curricula.

Structural oppressions facing Indigenous students in Canadian education

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27567 Structural oppressions facing Indigenous students in Canadian education 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Anita Olsen Harper (Lac Seul, Ontario, Canada)
Thompson Shirley (non-Indigenous,Canadian)
Indigenous peoples globally have been subjected to colossal losses of their populations, cultures, identities, ways-of-being and distinct educational systems; these colonizing oppressions continue. This informative session raises awareness of the ongoing structural barriers that Indigenous students in Canada face as they pursue further education. We emphasize three structural or systemic oppressions that Indigenous students face: poverty, the suppression of Indigenous identities, racism and gender violence that are salient to practically all Indigenous students. Also discussed will be self-determination as a means of regaining traditional education, knowledge, histories and cultures.

My Truth, My Pedagogy...

Topic: Indigenous Pedagogy

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27680 My Truth, My Pedagogy... 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Rebecca Gerrett-Magee (Yorta Yorta) Teaching within a colonial institution, often to very hostile privileged students has seen me over the past eleven years develop a personal pedagogy that is strongly embedded in my Indigenous identity and the history of resilience of my family and the Yorta Yorta people. My pedagogy is based on personal narratives, my own included, that directly challenge the privileged position of the students I teach, while simultaneously giving space for other marginalised voices, in particular Indigenous ones. This workshop will explore my use of narrative and story as Indigenous pedagogy, and its impact on my students both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, but also on myself as an educator.

There are Maori mountains in my sweatlodge

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27672 There are Maori mountains in my sweatlodge 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Paora Stanley (Ngai te rangi,New Zealand) Globally First Nations people have many similarities loss of, language, land, culture, violence, and excessive under-expectation. As a Maori male serving as the CEO of a Reservation in Quebec, I learnt just as much about my own culture as I did about Mi’gmaq traditions. The power of sweatlodge as medium of education, the integration of varying cultures, that also heals and provides pathways. In the darkness of a sweatlodge in Atlantic Canada, booms a Maori chant that was designed to move a mountain in my tribe, is used to move “mountains” in Eastern Canada. I will compare and contrast our two first nations, drawing sweatlodge as process and first nations culture as the solution.

Indigenous Language Certificate Program- University of Saskatchewan

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27645 Indigenous Language Certificate Program- University of Saskatchewan 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Kevin Lewis (Cree,Treaty 6 Territory/ Ministikwan Lake Cree Nation) The Indigenous Language Certificate is all about working with learners of all levels of fluency and literacy. The Indian Teacher Education Program, College of Education, University of Saskatchewan have created 10 courses to help anyone that wants to expand their Cree proficiency and literacy. Special focus will be on speaking and assisting people find their indigenous voices.

Koorie Kids At School Program

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27663 Koorie Kids At School Program 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Muriel Bamblett (Australia/Yorta Yorta & Dja Dja Wurrung/Aboriginal) This workshop will introduce VACCA, Koorie Kids Stay At School Program and a 10 minute clip highlighting an example of our work through the program. Koorie Kids Stay At School Program in over a year has worked with 21 Aboriginal students aged from 10-16 who had a history of school disengagement, needing academic support, transitioning from Grade 6 to year 7 and Year 10 or finishing the final years of school with a range of learning & life challenges. The model focuses on working with the school to support engagement with Aboriginal students, regular contact, therapeutic & learning interventions, using culture as healing, men's & women's business, using Elders and supporting the family.

P?horo - A model for M?ori Student Engagement'

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27665 P?horo - A model for M?ori Student Engagement' 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Naomi Manu (NZ Māori,New Zealand) The workshop will present the evolution of a STEM Academy to support Māori student and family engagement in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). The workshop will present findings following the first year of programme implementation including discussion around community development, whānau (family engagement), Māori centred approach to learning and the potential impact on Māori economic development.

Ignite Session 74: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing - Thursday, July 27th - 15:00-15:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27977 Ignite Session 74: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing 03:00 PM 03:15 PM Thursday Ku Kia’i Mauna – Hawai’i
27978 Ignite Session 74: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing 03:15 PM 03:30 PM Thursday Te Aumangea - Resilience
27979 Ignite Session 74: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing 03:30 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Kura Kaupapa Māori - Celebrating Resilience

Ignite Session 75: Indigenous Languages - Thursday, July 27th - 15:00-15:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27980 Ignite Session 75: Indigenous Languages 03:00 PM 03:15 PM Thursday Xwemelch'stn Etsímxwawtxw Mini-School Program Analysis
27981 Ignite Session 75: Indigenous Languages 03:15 PM 03:30 PM Thursday Lakota Living Language Project
27982 Ignite Session 75: Indigenous Languages 03:30 PM 03:45 PM Thursday The Mobile Language Team: caring for language...making language strong.

Ignite Session 77: Culturally Responsive Education - Thursday, July 27th - 15:00-15:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27986 Ignite Session 77: Culturally Responsive Education 03:00 PM 03:15 PM Thursday Dreaming ourselves strong: Building Aboriginal student resiliency through story
27987 Ignite Session 77: Culturally Responsive Education 03:15 PM 03:30 PM Thursday The Shaping Influences of A Capable Person - A Doctoral Research Project to Inform Aboriginal Education in the NWT (and in Canada)
27988 Ignite Session 77: Culturally Responsive Education 03:30 PM 03:45 PM Thursday The Power of Indigenous Storytelling in Education - A New Zealand Maori Perspective

Ignite Session 7: Culturally Responsive Education - Thursday, July 27th - 15:00-15:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27776 Ignite Session 7: Culturally Responsive Education 03:00 PM 03:15 PM Thursday The Power of WE: Indigenous Program Development, Implementation, & Evaluation
27777 Ignite Session 7: Culturally Responsive Education 03:15 PM 03:30 PM Thursday Mohala i ka wai: Cultural Advantage as a Framework for Indigenous Culture-based Education and Student Outcomes
27778 Ignite Session 7: Culturally Responsive Education 03:30 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Aboriginal Peoples are from mother earth, most non-Aboriginals are from Pluto – Productive educational relationships demand cross-cultural understanding embedded in Mother Earth.

Ignite Session 15: Culturally Responsive Education - Thursday, July 27th - 15:00-15:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27800 Ignite Session 15: Culturally Responsive Education 03:00 PM 03:15 PM Thursday First Nations Curriculum Framework Development
27801 Ignite Session 15: Culturally Responsive Education 03:15 PM 03:30 PM Thursday Tū Rangatira - an indigenous model of educational leadership E kore au e ngaro, te kākano i ruia mai i Rangiātea
27802 Ignite Session 15: Culturally Responsive Education 03:30 PM 03:45 PM Thursday TAWHANA: Bridging the Gap. What takes precedence? Cultural tikanga or Western practices? An Indigenous Cultural Framework.

Ignite Session 14: Health & Wellness - Thursday, July 27th - 15:00-15:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27797 Ignite Session 14: Health & Wellness 03:00 PM 03:15 PM Thursday Home Help Hope - Transforming services to high risk families
27798 Ignite Session 14: Health & Wellness 03:15 PM 03:30 PM Thursday The Turtle Garden-Meditation and Medicine
27799 Ignite Session 14: Health & Wellness 03:30 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Education from the Heart: Creating Indigenous Spaces of Healing

Ignite Session 43: Indigenous Pedagogy - Thursday, July 27th - 15:00-15:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27884 Ignite Session 43: Indigenous Pedagogy 03:00 PM 03:15 PM Thursday From Perception to Action: The Emergence of Heart Pedagogy
27885 Ignite Session 43: Indigenous Pedagogy 03:15 PM 03:30 PM Thursday Miyikosowin: Finding our Giftedness
27886 Ignite Session 43: Indigenous Pedagogy 03:30 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Taku Mana E

Sacred Science of Circles; A Knowledge Building Process

Topic: Indigenous Research Methodology & Praxis

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28434 Sacred Science of Circles; A Knowledge Building Process 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Betty Bastien (Blackfoot. Treaty 7,Canada)
Geraldine Potts (Stony, treaty 6,Canada)
Angelina Prat (Dene Treaty 8 ,Canada)
The workshop will present on Sacred Science of the Circle as a research method. The culture and society of Indigenous cultures work through the metaphor of the circle and has proven to be effective in the transmission of knowledge for centuries. The existence of Indigenous Knowledge systems is premised on the circle, on the renewal, relational and transformational wisdom of the natural world. The practice embodies the Spirit and Heart of Indigenous cultures and rekindles the connection to the Sacred. The workshop will present an epistemology for knowledge building processes for transformative learning.

Education for Reconciliation

Topic: Public Education for Reconciliation

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28437 Education for Reconciliation 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Corinne Sperling (Metis,Canada)
Gabrielle Christopherson (Metis-Cree,Canada)
Education for Reconciliation is Alberta Education’s framework to improve relationships with Indigenous people throughout the education system. This workshop will highlight Ministry initiatives and projects for First Nation, Metis and Inuit student success and ensure that all Alberta students and teachers understand First Nations, Metis and Inuit perspectives and experiences in historical and contemporary contexts including residential schools and their legacy as well as treaties and agreements. Ministry staff will share their experiences of developing partnerships and joint commitments for professional learning, curriculum, and professional practice standards

The Historical Significance of Native Americans / First Nations at Harvard

Topic: Partnerships in Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28481 The Historical Significance of Native Americans / First Nations at Harvard 03:00 PM 03:45 PM Thursday Meagan Hill () Meagan is a Harvard graduate from Six Nations. Meagan will discuss the historical significance of Native Americans / First Nations at Harvard and how there exists an opportunity to learn at one of the best institutions in the world. Additionally, she will talk about the cross collaboration (U.S.A. & Canada) that the program facilitates, the research opportunities that exist between participants, communities, and professors at Harvard, all of which help share the Indigenous world view.

Strengthening Indigenous Communities through Family Involvement

Topic:

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28164 Strengthening Indigenous Communities through Family Involvement 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Willeen Whipple (Sicangu Lakota/Amskapi Pikuni (Blackfeet),United States) Engaging Families by Supporting Native Language and Culture Through Home Visitation
28165 Strengthening Indigenous Communities through Family Involvement 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Willeen Whipple (Sicangu Lakota/Amskapi Pikuni (Blackfeet),United States) Strengthening Native Communities by Supporting Families Through Tribal Home Visiting

Systemic Change Honoring Indigenous Knowledge

Topic: Nationhood & Sustainability

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28166 Systemic Change Honoring Indigenous Knowledge 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Diana Cournoyer (Oglala Sioux Tribe,United States)
Ahniwake Rose (Cherokee Nation,United States)
Tribal Consultation Resources
28167 Systemic Change Honoring Indigenous Knowledge 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Diana Cournoyer (Oglala Sioux Tribe,United States)
Ahniwake Rose (Cherokee Nation,United States)
Systemic Change Honoring Indigenous Knowledge

Developing effective assessment in Aboriginal Studies

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27596 Developing effective assessment in Aboriginal Studies 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Corrinne Franklin (Wiradjuri (Aboriginal Australian)io90[']]]]]]) Assessing students in higher education is of high importance, shaping the experience of students and can influence and challenge their worldview. Developing assessment that stimulates students to learn about Indigenous people, places and philosophies yet simultaneously about themselves, their worldview and their environment can be challenging. Particularly when given the disciplinary range of students enrolled in Aboriginal studies, combined with a diversity of cultural backgrounds. This workshop encourages a transformative approach to thinking about Aboriginal studies, presenting an opportunity to develop assessment that enables all students to become motivated and inspired to learn.

A celebration of Resilience - For Us, By Us, Our way - Mo Tatou, Ma Tatou, E ai kia Tatou

Topic: Indigenous Pedagogy

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27552 A celebration of Resilience - For Us, By Us, Our way - Mo Tatou, Ma Tatou, E ai kia Tatou 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Arihia Amiria Stirling (New Zealand Aotearoa - Te Whanau A Apanui, Ngati Porou)
Renae Maree Savage (Maori - Tangata Whenua,New Zealand Aotearoa - Te Whanau a Apanui, Ngati Porou)
This workshop is the incredible story of a school community that fought its way through institutionalised racism to purse their dream to be a school for its community steeped in Maori traditions and the Maori language being the first language of choice in very hostile climate. The 30 year journey of a school community which rose above the significant challenges placed before them to becoming an excellent learning institution recognised by world leaders as innovative and inspirational and its key to success of validating indigenous knowledge and being ancestrally driven but future focussed.

Wiridjiribin Nura: Respect, Patience, Observation.

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27681 Wiridjiribin Nura: Respect, Patience, Observation. 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Rhett Burraston (Ngemba Country and Mandandanji Country (Australia),Ngemba Country and Mandandanji Country (Australia)) Wiridjiribin Nura is a multi-purpose learning space based in Reiby Juvenile Justice Centre and is used collaboratively with Dorchester Education and Training Unit as an area of cultural enrichment for young people residing in the centre. Wiridjiribin Nura has an emphasis on healing due to the profound influence of Aboriginal culture which in turn contributes to the increased engagement of education and positively affects the behaviours of youth in custody. Due to community input and decision making capacities held by Aboriginal staff, Wiridjiribin Nura is an example of when government institutions are flexible and courageous in order to cater to their clients, Aboriginal youth in custody.

Kiowa Language Persistence and Teaching Our Histor(ies)

Topic: Teaching Indigenous Histories

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27704 Kiowa Language Persistence and Teaching Our Histor(ies) 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Toni Tsatoke (Kiowa,US) Despite a small population and difficult history marked by resistance & change, the Kiowa people have a strong culture that has survived great odds.Kiowa origins have been traced north to Saskatchewan, however a southward migration resulted in settlement in Oklahoma where the tribal headquarters remain. Systematic land cession has reduced the domain of the Kiowa to a disjointed "trust" land base and endangered language. Despite forced cultural and linguistic assimilation, many Kiowas have maintained the language. This presentation will offer, 1) Kiowa perspective of history, and related issues, 2) overview of current language efforts, and 3) resources for creating interactive language games.

Boarding School Business: The Experiences of Indigenous Girls Attending Boarding Schools

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27632 Boarding School Business: The Experiences of Indigenous Girls Attending Boarding Schools 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Jessa Rogers (Aboriginal Australian,Wiradjuri) Underpinned by Martin’s (2003) relatedness theory, I designed a study based on Indigenous research principles and methodologies. Creating an arts-based Indigenous research method specifically for the youth in my study (photoyarn) saw 45 Indigenous young women employing social media, mobile phone images, and yarning as co-researchers in NZ and AUS. These students, through their images and yarns, give personal insight into boarding school experiences young Indigenous women are having in Australia currently. I will share, with permission, student images and quotes alongside findings from my research, with recommendations toward achieving reconciliation in Australian boarding schools today.

Chicana Herstory- You've heard "History", now hear hers

Topic: Teaching Indigenous Histories

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27656 Chicana Herstory- You've heard "History", now hear hers 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Maria Ramirez (Chicana/Puerto Rican/Apache,United States of America) Utilizing the Indigenous art of storytelling, oral history, rap music, and spoken word, including teatro, Maria presents a feminine perspective on what has transpired over these past 500+ years since 1492, when Columbus invaded the Americas. Before Columbus, over 70% of the Indigenous nations were peaceful and Clan centered. The invasion of 1492,followed by the infamous papal Bull of 1493 and its deadly "Doctrine of Discovery", ushered in genocide on a hemispheric level, disruption of native values, patriarchy, and a legacy of rape and violence against Mother Earth and women and children that haunt us to this day. Yet, a new cycle of unity is unfolding to end the reign of the 1%.

Metis Nation of Alberta Social Determinants of Health: A community survey method

Topic: Indigenous research

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27436 Metis Nation of Alberta Social Determinants of Health: A community survey method 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Britt Voaklander (Metis Nation of Alberta,Sara Hassen Parker)
M. Jill Sporidis (Metis Nation of Alberta)
In Alberta, little information exists on the prevalence of the Social Determinants of Health of Metis people. In response to this gap of information the Métis Nation of Alberta in partnership with the University of Alberta has undertaken the development of a survey collecting information on the Social Determinants of Health along with risky health behaviors. Community data collection methods involve health and wellness workshops as a way to disseminate previous research, discuss and distribute the survey, and provide a space to collect community input on current health initiatives. Findings will be used to develop culturally sensitive health promotion education programs and materials.

Mana ki te Mana: Socio-cultural shifts in teacher practice

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27448 Mana ki te Mana: Socio-cultural shifts in teacher practice 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Dr Sonja Macfarlane (New Zealand)
Professor Angus Macfarlane (Te Arawa Tribe,New Zealand)
Porsha London (New Zealand)
In NZ a national school wide initiative under the auspices of the Ministry of Education (MoE) was introduced in 2010, a sequel to a Behaviour Summit which emphasized the need for schools to systemize their approaches in the area of education provision for students who present with challenging behaviour. The MoE contracted a south island university and tribal entity to work in partnership to trail a PLD project to respond to the needs of indigenous Māori children and their families. Given the theme “A Celebration of Resilience” we present interim findings from a doctoral study that focuses on the shifts in teacher practice through the PLD framework mana ki te mana (authority with integrity).

A?agwata:h??:ni? - Creating our path

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27449 A?agwata:h??:ni? - Creating our path 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Karen Sandy (First Nation,Cayuga Nation of Sx Nations of the Grand River Territory)
Kehte Deer (Mohawk Nation of the Six Nations of the Grand)
Renae Hill (First Nation,Cayuga Nation at Six Nations)
Title: A?agwata:h??:ni? - Creating our path Six Nations Language Commission For over a decade, the Six Nations Language Commission has provided support to adult language immersion programs in our community. In that time, we have made significant progress in understanding the steps we must take to better support our programs and create a critical mass of speakers of the Haudenosaunee languages. In this lecture we take a retrospective look at language programming in the Six Nations community, and share our thoughts on these questions: What works, what can we leave behind? What did we used to do, what have we learned since? What is on the path ahead of us? Key insights include (relative to our languages): 100% immersion is crucial; Have a clear beginning, middle, and end to your program; Have something to measure against; Be reflective; Research, research, research; Have the right vision. Our presentation will also include the Cayuga language Program Manager to offer direct insights and discussion.

The Inuit Bachelor of Education Program: An example of how partnerships, cultural inclusion, and Language delivery can combine to create a one-of-a-kind program.

Topic: Partnerships in Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27462 The Inuit Bachelor of Education Program: An example of how partnerships, cultural inclusion, and Language delivery can combine to create a one-of-a-kind program. 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Jodie Lane (Inuit,Canada)
Lucy Brennan (Inuit,Canada)
Sylvia Moore (Inuit,Canada)
A look at the steps taken, obstacles overcome and dreams realized in the creation of the Inuit Bachelor of Education program that has been infused with the Labrador Inuktitut Training Program curriculum to give students the added bonus of learning their language. The IBED is a culturally based program developed in partnership between the Nunatsiavut Government and Memorial University. To our knowledge, nowhere in the world will you find such a partnership between an academic institution and an Aboriginal Government to provide such an opportunity. This truly is groundbreaking work!

Pēpi - Pack (First Connections) Nau mai e rea kia mihi atu tō iwi ki a koe = Weaving our newest strands of Tahu

Topic: Child Welfare

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27516 Pēpi - Pack (First Connections) Nau mai e rea kia mihi atu tō iwi ki a koe = Weaving our newest strands of Tahu 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Andre Konia (Maori,Aotearoa New Zealand)
Jolene Marunui (Maori,Aotearoa New Zealand)
Ngai Tahu are a Maori tribe indigenous to Te Waipounamu (the South Island) of New Zealand. As a way of connecting whānau (families) to the tribe, a pēpi (new born baby) pack was developed as a traditional woven baby basket. The basket was designed to keep babies safe to sleep and to connect whānau with their tribal ancestors. Each pack includes a whakapapa (family tree) scroll that links the baby to his/her ancestor from the tribe’s 1848 census with a green stone pendent unique to the pack. In this presentation we provide the findings from the first phase of this program and highlight key enablers and challenges to supporting families.

Educational Emancipation to the New Millennium a Perspective From Maori and Native American

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27493 Educational Emancipation to the New Millennium a Perspective From Maori and Native American 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Sophie Nock (Ngati Kuri Maori,New Zealand/Ngati Kuri/Maori)
Deirdre Almeida (Lenni Lenape/Shawnee,United States/Lenni Lenape/Shawnee/Native American)
Education has been a major tool in the oppression of Indigenous people and has served as a means to destroy traditional cultures, tear apart families and exterminate languages. Indigenous nations are uniting in their mutual efforts to achieve educational emancipation. This is a presentation of mutual efforts between Maori and Native American scholars comparing each community's educational experiences under similar colonial systems and contemporary efforts to reclaim language and identity. It will examine oral traditions of Maori and Native Americans, the impact of colonial education systems, such as boarding schools, contemporary efforts of Maori and Native Americans to emancipate their education.

Unuhia te pou: Creating a culturally responsive environment for learners of te reo Māori

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27700 Unuhia te pou: Creating a culturally responsive environment for learners of te reo Māori 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Te Hurinui Clarke (Aotearoa/ New Zealand) As tertiary institutions embrace technology by offering more programmes in online teaching and learning environments, teachers grapple with student engagement in these domains. This is a priority for language teachers wanting to create an online environment which is as stimulating as their face to face classes. As the technology has developed so too has the online pedagogy of language teachers however there are still opportunities to improve the levels of engagement with online learners. Sir (Professor) Mason Durie’s metaphor of the four pou (cornerstones or pillars) perhaps best describes what could be the missing element from the online engagement equation.

Sensual Ethnomathematics

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27646 Sensual Ethnomathematics 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Kori Czuy (Canada/Metis) Mathematics at its historical core has allowed human beings to better make sense of space & time. The recent abstract definition of math has divorced it from humanity and the everyday through colonization and its power of generalization and dichotomies of right vs wrong. Ethnomathematics brings math back to its roots through Indigenous ways of knowing and sensory methodologies, to broaden math again, encompassing the body, the senses, the environment, the spirit, and socialization. This workshop roots math through activities of storyknifing and birch bark biting, encircling valuable stories and cultures through the embedded ethnomathematics of these holistic knowings.

Hao Kwi Tetnital: The Oneida Language Regenesis Project

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27659 Hao Kwi Tetnital: The Oneida Language Regenesis Project 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday (Oneida Nation – Turtle Clan,Canada) Many First Nation communities are scrambling to save their disappearing languages. Limited resources both human and financial are being strained to their limits desperately trying to replicate programming that has shown even a glimmer of success on the front lines of language revitalization. The Oneida Regenesis Project tells the story of a group of Oneidas who have taken the time to study and apply global research models, to the program planning, development and shaping (through trial and error) of a model and method of teaching and learning Oneida as a second language, which is commensurate to the Oneida community context. This ethnographic case study is told from the emic perspective of the researcher-participant who is also director of the community language centre where the research is taking place. An Indigenist framework is used in the analysis of the responses and behaviours of the master speakers and cultural elders who are central to this work as the last remaining keepers of the Oneida language. Oneida ways of doing things and Oneida ways of understanding is central to the process emerging. This work may be useful to other groups who are struggling to save indigenous minority language from the brink of extinction.

Mobilizing our Past to Succeed in the Future: Culturally Responsive Leadership from a Pacific Islander's Perspective

Topic: Nationhood & Sustainability

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27660 Mobilizing our Past to Succeed in the Future: Culturally Responsive Leadership from a Pacific Islander's Perspective 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Mary Therese Hattori (Chamoru,Guåhan) In “Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy: A Needed Change in Stance, Terminology, and Practice”, Paris advocates for culturally sustaining pedagogy: “The term culturally sustaining requires that our pedagogies be more than responsive of or relevant to the cultural experiences and practices of young people—it requires that they support young people in sustaining the cultural and linguistic competence of their communities while simultaneously offering access to dominant cultural competence." I have experienced Paris’ ideal as applied to leadership and share elements of a culturally sustaining praxis based on my native Chamoru culture; this can serve as a model for other indigenous people.

Ignite Session 89: Culturally Responsive Education - Thursday, July 27th - 16:00-16:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
28022 Ignite Session 89: Culturally Responsive Education 04:00 PM 04:15 PM Thursday The Path - From School Readiness to University
28023 Ignite Session 89: Culturally Responsive Education 04:15 PM 04:30 PM Thursday Alaska Native Scholars: A Mixed-methods Investigation of Factors Influencing Ph.D. Attainment
28024 Ignite Session 89: Culturally Responsive Education 04:30 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Canoe Futures

Ignite Session 105: Culturally Responsive Education - Thursday, July 27th - 16:00-16:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
28071 Ignite Session 105: Culturally Responsive Education 04:15 PM 04:30 PM Thursday Curriculum Based and Community Driven Programming for Indigenous Children and Youth
28072 Ignite Session 105: Culturally Responsive Education 04:30 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Innovation at the Edges; The Youth+ Education Model

Ignite Session 53: Partnerships in Education - Thursday, July 27th - 16:00-16:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27914 Ignite Session 53: Partnerships in Education 04:00 PM 04:15 PM Thursday Widening the Circle, a collaborative conference on Indigenous education in Wisconsin, USA: development and evaluation of a homegrown conference.
27915 Ignite Session 53: Partnerships in Education 04:15 PM 04:30 PM Thursday ‘Shawane Dagosiwin’ Sharing Indigenous knowledges through conferences as sites of Indigenous learning.
27916 Ignite Session 53: Partnerships in Education 04:30 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Wingara Mura Bunga Burrabugu - A thinking path to make tomorrow

Ignite Session 73: Culturally Responsive Education - Thursday, July 27th - 16:00-16:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27974 Ignite Session 73: Culturally Responsive Education 04:00 PM 04:15 PM Thursday The Va'atele Framework: Building resilience through transformative Pasifika education
27975 Ignite Session 73: Culturally Responsive Education 04:15 PM 04:30 PM Thursday Residential School Survivor – The Next Generation of Stories of Resilience
27976 Ignite Session 73: Culturally Responsive Education 04:30 PM 04:45 PM Thursday 'The Strength of Shame: Stories of [Un Earthing] the Resilience of Aboriginal Women'

Ignite Session 85: Culturally Responsive Education - Thursday, July 27th - 16:00-16:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
28010 Ignite Session 85: Culturally Responsive Education 04:00 PM 04:15 PM Thursday Resilience and Persistence in Inuit Schools: Case Studies of Success
28011 Ignite Session 85: Culturally Responsive Education 04:15 PM 04:30 PM Thursday Māori (Student) Achievement at The University of Waikato, New Zealand: Advancing Māori success and overcoming challenges - an indigenous perspective
28012 Ignite Session 85: Culturally Responsive Education 04:30 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Framing Success Through Aboriginal Cultural Standards

Ignite Session 21: Culturally Responsive Education - Thursday, July 27th - 16:00-16:45

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Title
27818 Ignite Session 21: Culturally Responsive Education 04:00 PM 04:15 PM Thursday Still Standing Strong - Our Spirit, Our Journey, Our Children
27820 Ignite Session 21: Culturally Responsive Education 04:15 PM 04:30 PM Thursday Culturally Responsive and Relational Pedagogy supported by Educationally Powerful Connections with Whanau and Iwi
27819 Ignite Session 21: Culturally Responsive Education 04:30 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Culturally Responsive Inclusion of Metis Content and Perspectives in an Urban Setting

Elders Resiliency Strategies for youth Mentors

Topic: Lifelong Learning

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28433 Elders Resiliency Strategies for youth Mentors 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Darrell Anderson (Bigstone Cree Nation,Canada)
Shelley Hamelin ()
Prescilla Auger ()
Our Wabasca/Desmarais School Mentors Club and the Local Elders Lodge are researching the history of resiliency in our Elders by discussing what happened in Residential School and throughout their lifespan. Mentors visit Elders on a weekly basis to interview and record the Elder's experiences. Through documentation and discussion students will be able to identify the different strategies that Elder's have used to survive and thrive.

Building Strengths from Within: An Indigenous Framework for Diversity and Mentorship

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28440 Building Strengths from Within: An Indigenous Framework for Diversity and Mentorship 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Zaa Derik Gammel Joseph (Tl'azt'en Nation, Dakelh,Canada)
Andrew Judge (Aanishinaabe,Canada)
Kyla Epstein (Jewish,South Africa)
Stories of success in Indigenous education help educators build upon the strengths already existing within. Our voices: Indigenous grad student, educator & faculty member engagement officer, merge to offer insight into a new initiative at BCIT - establishing an Indigenous Framework for Diversity and Mentorship. This initiative will contribute to an emerging body of scholarship that underscores the distinct knowledge that an Indigenous paradigm can offer a post secondary institution seeking to diversify. Our presentation will speak directly to the reality that supporting an increasingly diverse student body requires investment and enhancing the awarenesses of faculty, staff & management.

Native Control of Native Education: A Systems Approach to Education and Advocacy in Hawai'i via Keaomalamalama

Topic: Governance

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28445 Native Control of Native Education: A Systems Approach to Education and Advocacy in Hawai'i via Keaomalamalama 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Walter Kahumoku (Native Hawaiian,U.S.A. )
Lisa Watkins-Victorino (Native Hawaiian,U.S.A. )
Sylvia Hussey (Native Hawaiian,U.S.A. )
The workshop will describe the transition of a group of like-minded individuals from event planners to a group of advocates who convene and collaborate with communities to realize the Native Hawaiian Education Vision, Mission and Goals. Come to learn about how individuals in the group "Keaomalamalama": answer the call of, persist in and perpetuate the work to revolutionize education for Native Hawaiians; strengthen generations of educators and leaders; operate agnostic of formal organization and Western governance constructs; and advance systemic work to exercise Native control of Native education.

Metis Control of Metis Education

Topic: Indigenous Pedagogy

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28444 Metis Control of Metis Education 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Yvonne Poitras Pratt (Metis,Canada)
Solange Lalonde (Metis,Canada)
Guido Contreras (Metis,Canada)
The recent formation of the Alberta Metis Education Council represents the collective resilience of the Metis to persevere through a legacy of destructive impacts caused by a colonial past. Due to limited funding and capacity, lack of awareness, and failure to engage, the Metis have been relegated to a marginalized positioning in the realm of education. In response to the intent of policy to silence and remove, we navigate beyond limitations of a colonial past to assert the role of education as an integral process of self-determination. We offer insights into how innovations in educational programming have allowed us to forge ahead with our collective values and vision and invite dialogue.

Collaborative pathways of leadership in education for Maori

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
28454 Collaborative pathways of leadership in education for Maori 04:00 PM 04:45 PM Thursday Makao Bowkett (Maori,Ngati Rangiwewehi, Te Arawa, Ngati Parewhero, Te Rarawa,New Zealand) Kaupapa Maori approaches to leadership that could assist secondary school principals and teachers to foster an environment to facilitate more appropriately, in Maori terms, the learning and teaching of Maori students were investigated in two types of secondary schools in Aotearoa New Zealand: one mainstream and one kaupapa Maori. In each school, interviews were undertaken with the two principals, groups of teachers and groups of parents. In addition two significant Maori leaders in education were interviewed for their insights into the state of Maori education. Through their authentic voices and experiences the hope is to inspire educators and researchers to seek better outcomes for Maori.

Friday

Indian Teacher Education Program

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28101 Indian Teacher Education Program 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Friday Chris Scribe (Carry the Kettle Nakota Nation)
Yvette Arcand (Cree,Canada/Beardy's & Okemasis Cree Nation)
Arlene Bear (Plains Cree,Canada)
45 Years of First Nation Post Secondary Student Success - The Past, Present & Future of the Indian Teacher Education Program
28102 Indian Teacher Education Program 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Friday Edie Venne (Canada)
Mika Lafond (Cree,Canada)
Mentorship and Learning Communities for Indigenous Students in the Indian Teacher Education Program
28103 Indian Teacher Education Program 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Friday Irene Oakes (Plains Cree,Canada)
Pamela Peterson (Plains Cree,Canada)
Marnie Ross (Plains cree,Canada)
Field Experiences from a First Nations Holistic Perspective

Bridging Online Learning with Indigenous Pedagogy and Worldviews

Topic: Innovations in Indigenous Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28089 Bridging Online Learning with Indigenous Pedagogy and Worldviews 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Friday Jean-Paul Restoule (Anishinaabe (Dokis First Nation),Canada/Anishinaabe) Designing an online course for principals working in First Nations schools
28090 Bridging Online Learning with Indigenous Pedagogy and Worldviews 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Friday Jean-Paul Restoule (Anishinaabe (Dokis First Nation),Canada/Anishinaabe) Bringing Indigenous ways of teaching and learning to online learning: A MOOC on Indigenous Worldviews

language revitalization strategies and frameworks; what can we learn globally

Topic: Indigenous Languages

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Title
28128 language revitalization strategies and frameworks; what can we learn globally 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Friday Joeann Walters (Ngatiwai and Ngapuhi - Tangata Whenua First Nations,New Zealand Maori Tangata Whenua - First Nations)
Taipari Munro (Ngatiwai and Ngapuhi - Tangata Whenua - First Nations,New Zealand - Maori Tangata Whenua - First Nations)
Aperahama Kerepeti-Edwards (Ngatiwai, Ngapuhi, Ngatikahungunu - Tangata Whenua - First Nations,New Zealand - Maori Tangata Whenua - First Nations)
Elliot Heremaia ()
Te Kupenga Reo o Ngatiwai - A Iwi Tribal revitalisation programme for Te Reo me Ona Tikanga
28129 language revitalization strategies and frameworks; what can we learn globally 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Friday Edosdi / Judith Thompson (Tahltan,Tahltan / Canada) Dah Dẕāhge Nodes̱idē: Implementing a Community-Based Tahltan Language Revitalization Framework

T? te Manawa

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27547 T? te Manawa 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Friday Hone Morris (Māori,Aotearoa)
Oriana Paewai (Māori,Aotearoa)
This presentation outlines an initiative, entitled ‘Tū Te Manawa’ (The heart stands in admiration/The heart stands still) originating from the activity of taunaha (bespeaking the land) by the ancestor Haunui-a-Nanaia. The initiative Tū Te Manawa involves erecting eight whare (educational kiosks) along the length of the Manawatū River at culturally important sites to house information and provide a place for people to engage in historical narrative and scientific knowledge; to enhance hapū and iwi (tribe) involvement in restoring the mauri of the Manawatu River; to increase the mana whenua (authority over land) of hapū, iwi and the wider community to the river.

Forced Community Closures and the New Roadmap

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27695 Forced Community Closures and the New Roadmap 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Friday Tallulah Bieundurry (Walmatjarri People of Western Australia) The Forced Closure of Communities was a government proposal announced in 2014 to close the up to 150 remote Aboriginal communities within Western Australia's Kimberley Region. Aboriginal people in these communities suffer from poor health, unemployment, lack of education and abject poverty and are now under threat of being directly cut off from municipal services such as water and electricity. I will be discussing the issues that these communities are currently facing and the worsening of this due to their closures. These closures are a direct breach of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People and should not be tolerated.

Recovering, Revitalization, and Restoring Our Families: Developing RESILIENCE, healing and WELLNESS, through Traditional Parenting

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27422 Recovering, Revitalization, and Restoring Our Families: Developing RESILIENCE, healing and WELLNESS, through Traditional Parenting 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Friday Holly Fontaine (Saugeen First Nation,Anishinabe, Canada, Indigenous)
Elma Arthurson (Hollow Water First Nation,Anishinabe, Canada, Indigenous)
Parenting is the most important job any individual will have in their lifetime, it is also one of the most challenging. In a nurturing and empowering environment, this workshop will incorporate modern day parenting techniques and how communities historically came together to love and teach children. By acknowledging what we already know about healthy parenting techniques, young adults can benefit from these still that will lead to future families that are strong, proactive and grounded in our rich and vibrant history.

Rethinking the 'Aboriginal' in Aboriginal Service Provision

Topic: Justice & Equity

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27510 Rethinking the 'Aboriginal' in Aboriginal Service Provision 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Friday Jack Gibson (Butucarbin Aboriginal Corporation,Australia - Wiradjuri)
Jennifer Beale (Butucarbin Aboriginal Corporation,Australia - Gomeroi)
The 1970s saw the establishment of an Aboriginal community sector across Australia: providing varied services. I pose the question, 'What does the prefix 'Aboriginal’ mean, in this context. The term Aboriginal is conflated with particular values, knowledge and sense of being. A commonsense view of "Aboriginal knowledge" has gained epistemic legitimacy. I argue that such commonsense notions are, in fact, constructed and may be complicit in maintaining particular power relationships that mark Aboriginal people as "other". I use Foucault's work to uncover the power structures and uneven power relations that Aboriginality may mask.

Yukon First Nations and Government Partnering for System Change in Education

Topic: Partnerships in Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27517 Yukon First Nations and Government Partnering for System Change in Education 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Friday Tosh Southwick (Kluane Lake First Nation,Yukon Territory, Canada)
Judy Arnold (Kluane Lake First Nation,Canada)
The Yukon First Nations Education Commission and Yukon Education are working in partnership to improve the success of Yukon First Nations students. We have moved forward in the areas of: Evaluating together evidence of student performance; Redesigning curricula to address Yukon wide and local First Nations learning; Developing cultural inclusion standards to assess schools; Working in partnership on hiring of education staff and universal expectations for background knowledge; Designing a teacher evaluation process; Building educator capacity; Developing an engagement policy to ensuring that First Nations are involved at the beginning of all initiative in education.

The Newcomers Covenenant

Topic: Indigenous Knowledge & Ways of Knowing

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27522 The Newcomers Covenenant 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Friday Kelly Davis (Cayuga Wolf Clan,Cayuga of the Haudenosaunee)
Karl Dockstader (Oneida Bear Clan,On^yote:aka Haudenosaunee)
People are coming from abroad to unlock the opportunity of life on Turtle Island, as they have been for centuries, but that opportunity as told to the Indigenous people of this land lies within. To find it, all the people need to do is listen for the guidance from the ancestors, live a life of thankfulness, and be mindful of the unborn faces in the earth. These instructions were left for everybody, shared through the Treaties to the first newcomers, and need to be rejuvenated by the reconciliation process to everybody else. In this workshop Cayuga Kelly Davis and Oneida Karl Dockstader will model how to live the principles, walk the lessons, and journey forward with a good mind.

Celebrating Student Success in Indigenous Education in Canada: A Presentation of the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC)

Topic: Culturally Responsive Education

Submission ID Parent Title Start Time End Time Day Primary Author/Presenter Author Workshop Description
27487 Celebrating Student Success in Indigenous Education in Canada: A Presentation of the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC) 10:00 AM 10:45 AM Friday Christy Rochelle Bressette (Canada (Turtle Island))
Chantal Beaulieu (Canadian)
Information will be shared about CMEC’s work, alongside provincial and territorial examples, in ar